The Wonder-Worker of Padua

The Wonder-Worker of Padua

by Charles Warren Stoddard

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The Wonder-Worker of Padua by Charles Warren Stoddard

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
III. FERNANDO THE AUGUSTINIAN CANON. Nearly a hundred miles from Lisbon stood the Abbey of Santa Cruz. It was lapped in the seclusion of Coim- bra; it was far from the trials, the temptations, the tribulations of the work-a-day world. It was the motherhouse of the Augustinians, the head cradle of the Order. The sweet influences of the saintly Theaton, its first prior, still perfumed it. It was the centre and the source of all the noblest traditions of the tribe, the inspiration of the clergy, the consolation and the pride of the loyal and widely scattered brotherhood. The Abbey was" a far-famed seat of learning. There Religion and Letters went hand in hand. DonJohn and Don Raymond, both Doctors of the University of Paris, were among the scholars at Santa Cruz. For a student, for a religious, for a recluse, there was no retreat in Portugal more desirable than this; and thither Fernando was sent. His new brethren were not long in convincing themselves that Fernando's change of residence had not been made without reflection, and that the love of novelty had no share in his decision. He had, it is true, ardently longed for solitude and tranquillity; but, far from seeking therein a dispensation from the rigor of monastic life, he sought but a means to perfect himself in virtue. At Lisbon he had read the literature of pagan antiquity; at Santa Cruz he devoted himself to the study of theology, the Fathers, history, religious controversy. Above all these, the Sacred Scriptures won his ardentattention. He was seventeen years of age when he entered Santa Cruz. Hewas completely detached from the world. Nature had in every way richly endowed him. His memory was prodigious. All knowledge came to him freely, without effort; and, once acquired, it never left him more, but, beautiful...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9785518500495
Publisher: Book on Demand Ltd.
Publication date: 10/28/2013
Pages: 202
Product dimensions: 5.83(w) x 8.27(h) x 0.46(d)

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III. FERNANDO THE AUGUSTINIAN CANON. Nearly a hundred miles from Lisbon stood the Abbey of Santa Cruz. It was lapped in the seclusion of Coim- bra; it was far from the trials, the temptations, the tribulations of the work-a-day world. It was the motherhouse of the Augustinians, the head cradle of the Order. The sweet influences of the saintly Theaton, its first prior, still perfumed it. It was the centre and the source of all the noblest traditions of the tribe, the inspiration of the clergy, the consolation and the pride of the loyal and widely scattered brotherhood. The Abbey was" a far-famed seat of learning. There Religion and Letters went hand in hand. DonJohn and Don Raymond, both Doctors of the University of Paris, were among the scholars at Santa Cruz. For a student, for a religious, for a recluse, there was no retreat in Portugal more desirable than this; and thither Fernando was sent. His new brethren were not long in convincing themselves that Fernando's change of residence had not been made without reflection, and that the love of novelty had no share in his decision. He had, it is true, ardently longed for solitude and tranquillity; but, far from seeking therein a dispensation from the rigor of monastic life, he sought but a means to perfect himself in virtue. At Lisbon he had read the literature of pagan antiquity; at Santa Cruz he devoted himself to the study of theology, the Fathers, history, religious controversy. Above all these, the Sacred Scriptures won his ardent attention. He was seventeen years of age when he entered Santa Cruz. Hewas completely detached from the world. Nature had in every way richly endowed him. His memory was prodigious. All knowledge cameto him freely, without effort; and, once acquired, it never left him more, but, beautiful...

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