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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
     

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

4.3 194
by L. Frank Baum
 

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First published in 1900, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is one of the most beloved children's books ever written. When Dorothy and Toto are suddenly swept off the plains of Kansas by a huge cyclone to the land of Oz, they meet up with some of the most endearing characters ever created - the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion. Together they set off on a

Overview

First published in 1900, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is one of the most beloved children's books ever written. When Dorothy and Toto are suddenly swept off the plains of Kansas by a huge cyclone to the land of Oz, they meet up with some of the most endearing characters ever created - the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion. Together they set off on a fantastic journey down the yellow brick road in search of the wonderful Wizard of Oz.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
A revelation. As rich in emotion as they are in detail.
Christian Science Monitor
A delightful volume illustrated with haunting but witty illustrations that provide a fresh, anti-Hollywood interpretation of the story.
Chicago Tribune
Combines substance with style. Ray Bradbury offers a poetic, reverential introduction, and Michael McCurdy contributes appropriately eerie drawings.
Washington Post Book World
Irresistible.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Viennese illustrator and Hans Christian Andersen Medalist Lisbeth Zwerger takes a fresh look at L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz in a large-format edition. Zwerger's fantastical, delicate, eccentric illustrations bear no resemblance to the vision of the movie; they make the classic tale new again. And readers can view the Emerald City through a pair of green-tinted glasses, provided in the back of the book.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
After a tornado transports her to the land of OZ, Dorothy must seek out the great wizard in order to return to Kansas. This is a facsimile of the first edition including 24 original color plates and 130 two color illustrations. It is another story that parents can share from their childhood, and it is perfect for reading reading-aloud (a chapter a night).
Children's Literature
Using a condensed version of Baum's original 1900 text, the illustrator provides us with his unique interpretation of this American fantasy. Dorothy and Toto still meet Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion on their way to Oz. Obstacles like the poppy field, flying monkeys and the fake wizard are met and overcome. Dorothy discovers what is truly valuable in life¾returning to gray old Kansas and the loving arms of her aunt and uncle. Santore has fun drawing the Cowardly Lion towering over his companions, bending the Wicked Witch of the West at outrageous angles, and painting Oz green, greener, and greenest. This shorter, centennial-celebration version with dynamic graphics may be just right to read to the younger set who wiggle too much to sit through the entire original version. 2000, Random House, $21.95. Ages 6 to 12. Reviewer: Chris Gill
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-In a brief endnote, the Viennese illustrator writes of the challenge of bringing something new to this American classic. Indeed, for many, Dorothy and Judy are one and the same, and there are over 20 trade versions of the book in print (not to mention the various pop-ups and other spin-offs). Well, make room for this new edition anyway; it's a beauty. What strikes readers first is the glorious red and sophisticated design of the larger-than-life poppies on the cover. Then it's the sheen of the high-quality paper and the extravagant amount of white space. Zwerger's characters are completely original. Dorothy is diminutive and feminine with straight, cropped hair. The rotund Scarecrow is dressed in an enormous blue overcoat; his gentle visage resembles a snowman's. The Wicked Witch is depicted as a gray-blue "mountain," capped with a small head. She fills the space, and wolves stand at attention on her form. The pages are a tour de force of design, some with a single, small illustrative detail, others with figures racing across two pages. Yet, the artist's style remains subtle: there is much to learn from close inspection of posture, expression, and placement.-Wendy Lukehart, Dauphin County Library, Harrisburg, PA
Kirkus Reviews
Zwerger (illustrator of Theodor Storm's Little Hobbin, 1995, etc.) creates characters who may, if not erase the MGM cast from the collective conscious of US readers, make them share some space therein. These tinkling, wafty creatures are very comfortable in Baumland—the creator did, after all, want this to be a fairy tale where "the heart-aches and nightmares are left out"—particularly the Scarecrow, with his stuffed-pillow head, conical hat, and tremendous girth. Zwerger doesn't try to overwhelm the story, and many of the pieces are small expressive exercises of her vision. In an illustrator's note, she says, "Baum's precise details—his vivid descriptions of the Munchkins, for example—make an illustrator almost superfluous." Actually, her paintings lead readers gracefully into the pages, to be surprised and entertained by the story they only think they know from the movie.

From the Publisher
“Baum was a true educator, and those who read his Oz books are often made what they were not—imaginative,
tolerant, alert to wonders, life.”—Gore Vidal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781495950605
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
02/14/2014
Pages:
98
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
8 - 13 Years

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Cyclone

Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife. Their house was small, for the lumber to build it had to be carried by wagon many miles. There are four walls, a floor and a roof, which made one room; and this room contained a rusty looking cooking stove, a cupboard for the dishes, a table, three or four chairs, and the beds. Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner. There was no garret at all, and no cellar-except a small hole, dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path. It was reached by a trap-door in the middle of the floor, from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole.

When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around, she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side. Not a tree nor a house broke the broad sweep of flat country that reached the edge of the sky in all directions. The sun had baked the plowed land into a gray mass, with little cracks running through it. Even the grass was not green, for the sun had burned the tops of the long blades until they were the same gray color to be seen everywhere. Once the house had been painted, but the sun blistered the paint and the rains washed it away, and now the house was as dull and gray as everything else.

When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife. The sun and wind had changed her, too. They had taken the sparkle from her eyes and left them a sober gray; theyhad taken the red from her checks and lips, and they were gray also. She was thin and gaunt, and never smiled, now. When Dorothy, who was an orphan, first came to her, Aunt Em had been so startled by the child's laughter that she would scream and press her hand upon her heart whenever Dorothy's merry voice reached her ears; and she still looked at the little girl with wonder that she could find anything to laugh at.

Uncle Henry never laughed. He worked hard from morning till night and did not know what joy was. He was gray also, from his long beard to his rough boots, and he looked stern and solemn, and rarely spoke.

It was Toto that made Dorothy laugh, and saved her from growing as gray as her other surroundings. Toto was not gray; he was a little black dog, with long, silky hair and small black eyes that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee nose. Toto played all day long, and Dorothy played with him, and loved him dearly.

Today, however, they were not playing. Uncle Henry sat upon the door-step and looked anxiously at the sky, which was even grayer than usual. Dorothy stood in the door with Toto in her arms, and looked at the sky too. Aunt Em was washing the dishes.

From the far north they heard a low wail of the wind, and Uncle Henry and Dorothy could see where the long grass bowed in waves before the coming storm. There now came a sharp whistling in the air from the south, and as they turned their eyes that way they saw ripples in the grass coming from that direction also.

Suddenly Uncle Henry stood up.

"There's a cyclone coming, Em," he called to his wife; " I'll go look after the stock." Then he ran toward the sheds where the cows and horses were kept.

Aunt Em dropped her work and came to the door. One glance told her of the danger close at hand.

Quick, Dorothy! " she screamed; "run for the cellar!

Toto jumped out of Dorothy's arms and hid under the bed, and the girl started to get him. Aunt Em, badly frightened, threw open the trap-door in the floor and climbed down the ladder into the small, dark hole. Dorothy caught Toto at last, and started to follow her aunt. When she was half way across the room there came a great shriek from the wind, and the house shook so hard that she lost her footing and sat down suddenly upon the floor.

A strange thing then happened.

The house whirled around two or three times and rose slowly through the air. Dorothy felt as if she were going up in a balloon.

The north and south winds met where the house stood, and made it the exact center of the cyclone. In the middle of a cyclone the air is generally still, but the great pressure of the wind on every side of the house raised it up higher and higher, until it was at the very top of the cyclone; and there it remained and was carried miles and miles ay as easily as you could carry a feather.

It was very dark, and the wind howled horribly around her, but Dorothy found she was riding quite easily. After the first few whirls around, and one other time when the house tipped badly, she felt as if she were being rocked gently, like a baby in a cradle.

Toto did not like it. He ran about the room, now here, barking loudly; but Dorothy sat quit still on the floor and waited to see what would happen.

Once Toto got too near the open trap-door, and fell in; first the little girl thought she had lost him. But saw one of his ears sticking up through the hole, for the strong pressure of the air was keeping him up so that he could not fall. She crept to the hole, caught Toto by the ear, and dragged him into the room again; afterward closing the trap-door so that no more accidents could happen.

Hour after hour passed away, and slowly Dorothy got over her fright; but she felt quite lonely, and the wind shrieked so loudly all about her that she nearly became deaf. At first she had wondered if she would be dashed pieces when the house fell again; but as the hours passed and nothing terrible happened, she stopped worrying and resolved to wait calmly and see what the future would bring. At last she crawled over the swaying floor to her bed, and lay down upon it; and Toto followed and lay down beside her.

In spite of the swaying of the house and the wailing of the wind, Dorothy soon closed her eyes and fell fast asleep.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
“Baum was a true educator, and those who read his Oz books are often made what they were not—imaginative,
tolerant, alert to wonders, life.”—Gore Vidal

Meet the Author

An American author chiefly known for his children's books, particularly The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen novel sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a host of other works.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
May 15, 1856
Date of Death:
May 6, 1919
Place of Birth:
Chittenango, New York
Place of Death:
Hollywood, California
Education:
Attended Peekskill Military Academy and Syracuse Classical School

Customer Reviews

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 194 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Since I was a child, my favorite movie has always been The Wizard of Oz. I can remember having the entire collection of plastic Oz characters, a Wizard of Oz lunch box, sleeping bag, and of course the famous back pack. I dressed up as Dorothy at least twice for Halloween and forced my dog along the way acting as Toto. But something I had never realized was that I never read the book. Recently comming across the opportunity to do so, I find the book just as amazing as the movie--if not better. Although I couldn't seem to get the image of Judy Garland out of my mind, I found that Dorothy is more adventureous than ever in Baum's novel. By reading The Wizard of Oz readers find out that the Land of Oz is even more fantastic than portrayed in the film version. Dorothy and company befriend a Queen of Mice, a China Princess, and even the King of the Flying Monkeys. Reading Baum's novel made me realize the wonders of being a child and visioning the fantastic voyage of Dorothy; however, the novel also made me realize that The Wizard of Oz is not only for children, but for adults as well. Reading this novel gives adults a chace to escape from the chaos of everyday life and enter a world full of wonder and excitement (not to mention the chance to revisit childhood). Baum's novel reminds us the of meaning of friendship, courage, love, and most of all that 'there is no place like home.' I recommend readers of all ages to revisit this timeless classic and enter into the Wonderful World of Oz.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have always loved the Wizard of Oz, it was probably the first live action film I ever saw and has greatly affected my life, fostering my love of musicals into something more than Disney ever could. I thought it was the greatest thing ever. Then I read the book when I was seven, I had just discovered it in my Grandfather's attic, and I decided that the book was by far superior. The story was longer, there was backstory, and it didn't have the weak, 'It was all a dream' ending, which I had always found disappointing. My love of the book was reaffirmed last year in my U. S. History class when the allegory of the novel was discussed in a featured essay, relating it to the argument between the gold and silver standard of the late 1800s. I highly recommend this book to anyone, but especially children with imaginations that need space to grow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book Its way better than the movie
Guest More than 1 year ago
Can you imagine that during World War II, two Australian brigades in North Africa actually marched into battle singing, 'We're off to see the Wizard/The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'? This just goes to show the appeal The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has, not only to children, but also to those special adults young in spirit. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a fantasy written by L. Frank Baum. It tells the story of Dorothy, a young farm girl from Kansas who is carried away by a cyclone to a strange land called Oz. In order to return home, she must travel to its capital, Emerald City, and ask the assistance of the Wizard of Oz. On her journey along the Yellow Brick Road, she meets three companions, a tin woodman, a talking scarecrow, and a cowardly lion with whom she has a series of adventures. Each has their own quest and individual wishes to fulfill. Upon reaching the Emerald City, Oz promises to fulfill their wishes if one of them first kills the Wicked Witch of the West. In my opinion, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz teaches, in a most entertaining way, a valuable lesson to all its readers - look no further for happiness than within yourself. Obviously, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a book worth reading. In addition to its entertainment value, it also inspires its readers to be happy with what they already possess. The characters in the story, Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion desperately desired things that they thought would make them happy, when in reality, they already possessed those things. True happiness has to come from within and the search for happiness should always begin there. This a valuable lesson for us all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
People who give bad ratings should give a reason not to get the book. Instead of saying this book is stuipid. You can still say it's stuipid after you give the reason.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is awesome and a good classic for kids
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good story with interesting characters and a good plot! It is very different than the movie, but that is a plus!
Anonymous 9 months ago
Sure. Rply to ash.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Definetly one of my personal favorites! I would definetly read this again. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Five star rating. MUST READ!!!!!
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Rachel Jillian Glennen Lucy Miriam Glennen
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Buy this TODAY!!!!!! Best book ever!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is so amazing! I've had other Robert Sabuda books, but this is definitely the favorite. Anyone who enjoys the Wizard of Oz will love all the special effects he is able to achieve!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this story and my son loves pop up books. This is the most incredible pop up booki have seen yet. The first page as you open it the tornado spins. It tells the entire story with side panels that have pop ups also. The art work is great and each page will keep your kids and yourself totally wrapped up in the story.
Eric_J_Guignard More than 1 year ago
REVIEWED: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz WRITTEN BY: L. Frank Baum PUBLISHED: May, 1900 There really isn’t much more to say than has already been offered a thousand time over. This book is a timeless classic. I just read it to my son and can confirm that the story is touching for all ages. He’s five, I’m thirty-seven, and we enjoyed it together. My parents love it, grandparents love it, etc. There are not a lot of fiction works that are appealing to so wide an audience. If you don’t know the basic story, according to the movie at least, your childhood was a sham. The book includes additional passages and adventures which were left out of the MGM film; it’s also darker and more violent than the movie... and lacks the songs. Five out of Five stars
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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It is a great book
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is awsomr
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