World-Mart

World-Mart

by Leigh Lane

Paperback

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Overview

Government and corporate business have merged in an attempt to keep the country from going bankrupt, the effects of global warming and antibiotic-resistant disease having caused a full collapse in infrastructure. The class divide has become profound, leaving most people trapped in an impoverished, working class world with little room for improvement. Complacency and corporate hierarchy control and confound the masses, run by the elite few, collectively referred to as "Corporate."

George Irwin remembers a time before the Big Climate Change, back when the airlines were still in business and people still drove their own cars. Sadly, his children have only known an indoor world of endless reconstruction, public shuttles, recycled water, and limited energy. The world has changed much over his lifetime, but he still believes in the American Dream. When an alleged terrorist act lands his wife in the hospital, however, George stumbles upon a Corporate secret that could mean the end of all civilization.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780615555744
Publisher: Cerebral Books
Publication date: 10/15/2011
Pages: 276
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.58(d)

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World-Mart 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Draak on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have to say that I really enjoyed the beginning of the book more than the end. Climate change, viruses that have become resistant to antibiotics, class segregation. Do as you are told or face the consequences which is usually death. It was a story that grabbed me from the beginning but lost me at the very end. It was a good read though.
katlb82 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
World-Mart depicts a very possible future reality ¿ class segregation, failing energy supplies, food shortages, global warming, anti-biotic resistant viruses and governmental control over every action and choice made in life. Your background, upbringing and ability to follow without questioning dictate whether you thrive or simply survive in the world. This is a thought-provoking and quite frightening book. I particularly found the idea of euthanasia of the ill and voluntary euthanasia for people who have found themselves, for whatever reason, demoted through the class ranks to be very disturbing and a reflection of the importance we place on bettering or at least maintaining our own statuses in life. World-Mart also contains some wonderful poetry written by one of the main characters, Shelley, which I found particularly moving. My only negative with this book was that some scenes played out way too quickly and could have been fleshed-out a little further, particularly to give a little more life to some of the characters. However this does not mean that the characters were flat or one-dimensional, simply that I wished I had gotten a chance to know them better, and particularly to know how the world came to be that of World-Mart.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Kim Anisi for Readers' Favorite World-Mart (Volume 1) by Leigh M. Lane takes place in a not so distant future - and some aspects are not even that far fetched. George and his family have to face some serious issues after his wife ends up in hospital after a suspected terrorist attack that was meant to infect people with a virus that causes certain changes. George unearths a few secrets that show him the world is not quite the way he thought it to be. At the same time, his daughter ends up on a path that leads her down a very dangerous and questionable road. The more George learns about what happened to his wife, the more he knows that things are not right - but he also loses track of what is happening with the rest of his family. Things fall apart on a variety of levels. Initially, I had not noticed that World-Mart (Volume 1) by Leigh M. Lane was part one of a series, so the end of the book was rather depressing (in my eyes). It is good to keep in mind that there will be more after the ending. This story is quite disturbing, but in a way that makes the novel very appealing because it is more real than stories in which everything somehow turns out to be all right. The characters make decisions readers might not find good. You might not be very happy about some things that happen - and you'll get drawn into the story on some sort of emotional level. You will feel it when bad things happen, but you will also cheer up when there are moments of hope. It is a very well done story with a perfect pace. If you like dystopian novels, then you should definitely give this series a try.
KatZombie More than 1 year ago
World-Mart depicts a very possible future reality – class segregation, failing energy supplies, food shortages, global warming, anti-biotic resistant viruses and governmental control over every action and choice made in life. Your background, upbringing and ability to follow without questioning dictate whether you thrive or simply survive in the world. This is a thought-provoking and quite frightening book. I particularly found the idea of euthanasia of the ill and voluntary euthanasia for people who have found themselves, for whatever reason, demoted through the class ranks to be very disturbing and a reflection of the importance we place on bettering or at least maintaining our own statuses in life. World-Mart also contains some wonderful poetry written by one of the main characters, Shelley, which I found particularly moving. My only negative with this book was that some scenes played out way too quickly and could have been fleshed-out a little further, particularly to give a little more life to some of the characters. However this does not mean that the characters were flat or one-dimensional, simply that I wished I had gotten a chance to know them better, and particularly to know how the world came to be that of World-Mart.