Writing For Children & Young Adults

Writing For Children & Young Adults

by Marion Crook

Paperback(Third Edition, Third edition)

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Overview

Writing For Children & Young Adults by Marion Crook

The dynamic world of reading and writing has changed greatly over the past few years. Writers are pitching their ideas online, exchanging works in progress with critique partners and forming street teams to promote their work. The online community of writers is a fast-paced and often confusing place. In the publishing world today, writers need to direct online traffic to their book and stimulate sales. In addition to the tried and true advice author Marion Crook shared in earlier editions of Writing for Children and Young Adults, in this vibrant new edition, Crook explains some of the nuances and choices about the writing world online that can overwhelm writers.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781770402768
Publisher: Self-Counsel Press, Inc.
Publication date: 09/01/2016
Series: Writing Series
Edition description: Third Edition, Third edition
Pages: 184
Sales rank: 1,194,872
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.40(d)

About the Author

Marion Crook has written many books for young adult and middle readers. Crook’s background in child development education as a nurse and her PhD in education giver her solid knowledge, but she maintains that a keen observation of people, places and events can be the author’s most useful tool. An experienced teacher and writer, she gives her readers clear and practical tips, with humor and understanding of what it’s like to write and publish. Marion Crook’s work includes ten novels and eight books of non-fiction for children and young adults as well as several books of fiction and non-fiction for adults.

Table of Contents

Introduction xiii

1 In the Beginning 1

1 Why Write? 1

2 A Writer's Attitude 3

3 A Writer's Beliefs 3

3.1 Believing in your characters 5

3.2 Believing in your readers 6

3.3 Letting your audience believe in you 6

4 A Writer's Responsibilities 7

5 Moral Tales 8

6 Appropriation of Voice 9

7 The Many Paths from Which to Choose 10

2 The Basic Ingredients of a Story 13

1 Character 13

1.1 The roster 14

1.2 Appearance 15

1.3 Depth 16

1.4 Contrast 17

1.5 Credibility 17

1.6 Habits 18

1.7 Intelligence 19

1.8 Diction 19

1.9 Names 22

2 Setting 23

2.1 Place 23

2.2 Time 24

2.3 Research 25

2.4 Fantasy 26

2.5 The educational aspect of settings 27

2.6 Mood 27

2.7 How does your character relate to place? 28

3 Plot 28

3.1 Motivation 29

3.2 Action 30

3.3 Development 30

3.4 Conflict 31

3.5 Who solves the problem? 32

3.6 Logic 33

3.7 Subplots 33

3.8 Beats 33

3.9 Turning points 34

3.10 Endings 34

3.11 Experiment 38

3 Getting Started 37

1 A Room of One's Own 37

2 Your Summary Statement 38

3 Creating Characters 39

4 Planning an Outline 39

5 Organize Your Writing Time 41

6 First Lines 41

7 The First Chapter 42

8 Reviewing the Outline 43

9 Financial Considerations 44

10 Sanity 45

4 The craft of writing 49

1 Narrator 49

1.1 Viewpoint 49

1.2 The character's point of view 52

1.3 First person or third person? 52

2 Dialogue 53

3 Mixing Dialogue and Narrative 53

3.1 Let the characters speak 53

3.2 Accents 55

3.3 Slang and swear words 56

3.4 Transitions 57

4 Creating Tension, Establishing Pace 58

5 Emotions and Intimacy: Connecting with the Reader 59

6 Style 60

6.1 Imagery 60

6.2 Language 62

6.3 The perfect word 63

6.4 Defining your style 65

7 Grammar and Composition 66

7.1 Is it important? 66

7.2 Usage: The right word 70

8 Writer's Block 70

9 Rewriting 72

9.1 The first rewrite 72

9.2 The second rewrite 74

10 Criticism 74

10.1 Inviting criticism 74

10.2 Striving for balance 76

10.3 Dealing with criticism 77

11 Defining Yourself As a Writer 78

5 Writing for Different Groups of Readers 80

1 Genres 81

2 Who Is Your Reader? 82

3 Picture Books 84

3.1 Formats 86

3.2 Content 189

3.3 Language 91

3.4 Illustrators 91

4 Ages Six to Eight 92

4.1 Formats 92

4.2 Content 92

4.3 Language 93

5 Juveniles or Middle-Grade 94

5.1 Formats 95

5.2 Content 95

5.3 Language 96

6 Young Adult, Teens 96

6.1 Format 96

6.2 Content 97

6.3 Language 98

7 New Adult 99

7.1 Format 99

7.2 Content 199

7.3 Language 100

8 Age-Appropriate Critics 100

6 Writing Nonfiction 103

1 Purpose 104

2 Format 105

3 Curriculum 106

4 Accurate Research 106

5 Begin with an Idea 108

6 Develop an Outline 108

7 Review 109

8 Specialization 110

9 The Second Book 111

7 Marketing Your Story to Publishers 113

1 The Publishing Process 114

2 Self-Publishing 114

3 Market Research 116

3.1 Educational publishers 116

3.2 Submission guidelines 117

3.3 Publishing categories 117

3.4 What publishers buy 118

3.5 Rejection 119

4 How to Approach the Market 120

4.1 The query letter 120

4.2 The synopsis 121

4.3 The author's platform 122

4.4 Multiple submissions 122

4.5 Appearance of manuscript 123

4.6 Planning ahead 124

4.7 Agents 126

5 Copyright 128

6 Contracts 128

6.1 Delivery date 129

6.2 Definition of rights 129

6.3 Publisher's obligation to publish 129

6.4 Copyright 129

6.5 Royalties 130

6.6 Licenses 132

6.7 Warranties and indemnities 132

6.8 Moral rights 133

6.9 Author's copies 133

6.10 Right of first refusal 133

6.11 Reversion of rights 133

7 Being Your Own Contractor 134

8 Marketing Your Book online 135

1 Tools 136

1.1 Websites 136

1.2 Email 137

1.3 Blogs 138

1.4 Twitter and other social media sites 139

2 Promotion 139

2.1 What you can do 139

2.2 Blog book tours 141

2.3 Giving away your work 141

2.4 Guest blogs 142

2.5 Reaching the reader 142

2.6 Additional tips on promotion 143

3 Selling Your Already Published Work Online 144

3.1 Self-published hard copy 144

3.2 Self-published e-books 145

4 E-books 146

4.1 Format: Creating the e-book 146

4.2 Registering your e-book 147

4.3 What does the reader need to access in your book? 147

4.4 The business of e-books 147

9 Book Promotion 149

1 Promoting 150

2 Interviews 153

3 The Enjoyment Factor 154

4 Your Backlist 155

5 Reviews 155

Conclusion: Is it worth Doing At All? 159

Afterword 163

Download kit 165

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