Wuthering Heights: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Wuthering Heights: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Paperback(Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

$16.97 $18.00 Save 6% Current price is $16.97, Original price is $18. You Save 6%. View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Wednesday, June 19

Overview

'May you not rest, as long as I am living. You said I killed you - haunt me, then' Lockwood, the new tenant of Thrushcross Grange on the bleak Yorkshire moors, is forced to seek shelter one night at Wuthering Heights, the home of his landlord. There he discovers the history of the tempestuous events that took place years before: of the intense passion between the foundling Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, and her betrayal of him. As Heathcliff's bitterness and vengeance is visited upon the next generation, their innocent heirs must struggle to escape the legacy of the past.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143105435
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/25/2009
Series: Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition Series
Edition description: Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 468,580
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Emily Jane Bronte was born July 30, 1818, at Thornton in Yorkshire, the fifth of six children of Patrick and Maria Bronte. Although Emily did spend a few short times away from Haworth, it was her primary residence and the rectory where she resided now serves as a Bronte Museum. Emily's only close friends were her brother Branwell and her sisters Charlotte and Anne. Emily died of tuberculosis on December 19, 1848, also at the age of thirty, and never knew the great success of her only novel Wuthering Heights, which was published almost exactly a year before her death. Born in Havana, Cuba in 1961, Ruben Toledo is an illustrator, painter, sculptor and filmmaker. His fashion illustrations have appeared in Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, The New Yorker, Visionaire, Paper, Interview and The New York Times, and his commissions have included Tiffany & Co., Estée Lauder and Nordstrom's national advertising campaign. Toledo and his designer wife Isabel Toledo are the subject of both a book and museum exhibition entitled Toledo/Toledo: A Marriage of Art and Fashion. Together they were recipients of the 2005 Cooper-Hewitt Design Award for their work in fashion.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Wuthering Heights"
by .
Copyright © 2009 Emily Bronte.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations     viii
About Longman Cultural Editions     ix
About This Edition     xi
Introduction     xv
Table of Dates: The Life of Emily Bronte     xxvi
The Chronology of Wuthering Heights     xxx
Wuthering Heights     1
Volume 1     3
Volume 2     141
Contexts     299
Biographical     303
Biographical Sketch     303
Emily Bronte in Elizabeth Gaskell's The Life of Charlotte Bronte (1857)     308
Writings   Emily Bronte     313
from "Diary Papers" (1834-1845)     313
"The Cat" (translation) (1842)     319
Charlotte Bronte's Selection of Poems by Ellis Bell (1850)     320
Charlotte Bronte on Ellis Bell     329
from "Biographical Notice of Ellis and Acton Bell" (1850)     330
from "Editor's Preface" (1850)     335
Historical, Social, and Legal     339
Heathcliff and the Unsettled Classes     339
Nomads of City and Country     341
Henry Mayhew, from London Labour and the London Poor (1861)     341
Self-Made Men and Luddites     343
Samuel Smiles, from Self-Help (1859)     343
Women's Rights and Roles     348
Ellis Bell and Sarah Stickney Ellis     348
Sarah Stickney Ellis, from The Women of England, Their Social Duties and Domestic Habits (1839)     349
Harriet Martineau, from "On Female Education" (1823)     352
Wills, Women, and Property     355
Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, from A Brief Summary, in Plain Language, of the Most Important Laws Concerning Women (1854)     355
A Tale of Two Houses: Interiors and Servants     357
Interiors     358
John Ruskin, from "The Nature of Gothic," The Stones of Venice (1851-1853)     359
Domestic Servants     361
Isabella Beeton, from The Book of Household Management (1861)     362
Regional and Popular     366
Where Are the Brontes From?     366
Ireland, Heathcliff, and the Brontes     367
William Wright, from The Brontes in Ireland (1893)     368
Yorkshire: Regionalism, Dialect, and Ballads     374
Regionalism     374
Elizabeth Gaskell, from The Life of Charlotte Bronte (1857)     375
Dialect     377
Richard Blakeborough, from Wit, Character, Folklore and Customs of the North Riding of Yorkshire (1898)     377
Ballads      380
Anonymous, "The Ghaist's Warning" (1812)     382
Pilgrims to Haworth     387
Matthew Arnold, from "Haworth Churchyard, April 1855" (1877)     387
Claude Meeker, from "Haworth; Home of the Brontes" (1895)     390
Virginia Woolf, from "Haworth, November 1904" (1904)     393
Shifting Literary Honors and the Beaten Track     395
Critical and Artful     398
Reviews of Wuthering Heights, 1848-1851     399
from Douglas Jerrold's Weekly Newspaper (January 1848)     399
from Atlas (January 1848)     400
G. W. P[eck], from "Wuthering Heights," The American Review (June 1848)     401
[E. P. Whipple], from "Novels of the Season," North American Review (October 1848)     403
[George Henry Lewes], from The Leader (December 1850)     404
[Sydney Dobell], from Eclectic Review (February 1851)     405
Early Criticism     406
Algernon Charles Swinburne, from "Emily Bronte" (1883)     406
Angus M. MacKay, from The Brontes: Fact and Fiction (1897)     407
Mary A. Ward [Mrs. Humphry Ward], from "Introduction," Wuthering Heights, Haworth Edition (1900)     409
May Sinclair, from The Three Brontes (1912)     410
Virginia Woolf, from "Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights" (1916)      412
Sites and Resources on the Brontes     413
Exhibits     413
Selected Web sites     415
Adaptations and Translations     415
Performances     415
Film/Television Adaptations     417
Some Translations     418
Some Sequels, Pendants, and Biographical Fiction     422
Further Reading     425
General Resources and Biographical Studies     425
Popular Reception and Travels to Bronte Country     430
Selected Criticism Since 1995     430

What People are Saying About This

Charlotte Bronte

Wuthering Heights was hewn in a wild workshop, with simple tools, out of homely materials... And there it stands colossal, dark, and frowning, half statue, half rock; in the former sense, terrible and goblin-like; in the latter, almost beautiful, for its colouring is of mellow grey, and moorland moss clothes it; and heath, with its blooming bells and balmy fragrance, grows faithfully close to the giant's foot.

Reading Group Guide

1. To what extent do you think the setting of the novel contributes to, or informs, what takes place? Do you think the moors are a character in their own right? How do you interpret Bronte's view of nature and the landscape?

2. Discuss Emily Bronte's careful attention to a rigid timeline and the role of the novel as a sober historical document. How is this significant, particularly in light of the turbulent action within? What other contrasts within the novel strike you, and why? How are these contrasts important, and how do they play out in the novel?

3. Do you think the novel is a tale of redemption, despair, or both? Discuss the novel's meaning to you. Do you think the novel's moral content dictates one choice over the other?

4. Do you think Bronte succeeds in creating three-dimensional figures in
Heathcliff and Cathy, particularly given their larger-than-life metaphysical passion? Why or why not?

5. Discuss Bronte's use of twos: Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange; two families, each with two children; two couples (Catherine and Edgar, and Heathcliff and Isabella); two narrators; the doubling-up of names. What is Bronte's intention here? Discuss.

6. How do Mr. Lockwood and Nelly Dean influence the story as narrators? Do you think they are completely reliable observers? What does Bronte want us to believe?

7. Discuss the role of women in Wuthering Heights. Is their depiction typical of Bronte's time, or not? Do you think Bronte's characterizations of women mark her as a pioneer ahead of her time or not?

8. Who or what does Heathcliff represent in the novel? Is he a force of evil or a victim of it?How important is the role of class in the novel, particularly as it relates to Heathcliff and his life?

Foreword

1. To what extent do you think the setting of the novel contributes to, or informs, what takes place? Do you think the moors are a character in their own right? How do you interpret Bronte's view of nature and the landscape?

2. Discuss Emily Bronte's careful attention to a rigid timeline and the role of the novel as a sober historical document. How is this significant, particularly in light of the turbulent action within? What other contrasts within the novel strike you, and why? How are these contrasts important, and how do they play out in the novel?

3. Do you think the novel is a tale of redemption, despair, or both? Discuss the novel's meaning to you. Do you think the novel's moral content dictates one choice over the other?

4. Do you think Bronte succeeds in creating three-dimensional figures in
Heathcliff and Cathy, particularly given their larger-than-life metaphysical passion? Why or why not?

5. Discuss Bronte's use of twos: Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange; two families, each with two children; two couples (Catherine and Edgar, and Heathcliff and Isabella); two narrators; the doubling-up of names. What is Bronte's intention here? Discuss.

6. How do Mr. Lockwood and Nelly Dean influence the story as narrators? Do you think they are completely reliable observers? What does Bronte want us to believe?

7. Discuss the role of women in Wuthering Heights. Is their depiction typical of Bronte's time, or not? Do you think Bronte's characterizations of women mark her as a pioneer ahead of her time or not?

8. Who or what does Heathcliff represent in the novel? Is he a force of evil or a victimof it? How important is the role of class in the novel, particularly as it relates to Heathcliff and his life?

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Wuthering Heights (Collins Classics) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1342 reviews.
CatieCat75 More than 1 year ago
This book will always and forever be one of my favorites. The characters are very unconventional in the fact that they are created as flawed and real human beings. The way that Catherine Earnshaw was such a selfish human was realistic to me. The way that Heathcliff was so cruel, but loved Catherine so much was realistic. The structure of the book was beautiful as well as the writing. I would suggest this to people who enjoy classic literature. I would not suggest this to most people who have read Stephenie Meyers' "Twilight" without them knowing that the love affair between Catherine and Heathcliff is not at all healthy and slightly disturbing. Its not like Edward and Bella.
RHRH319 More than 1 year ago
It is the classic crazy love story. The two main charcaters, Cathy and Heathcliff, are madly in love with each other, but both feel it is an impossible love. Cathy marries money in hopes to help Heathcliff, Heathcliff runs off to better himself in hopes to deserve Cathy. It is a mixed up story full of fantastic charcters and an ever twisting plot. And it has, I believe, one of the most romantic endings ever written. I highly recommend this book!
Sissy_Girl More than 1 year ago
After reading some of the scathing reviews on this book I had to put in my two cents. Wuthering Heights is by no means a dainty, happy book. But it has a deeper meaning in my opinion. I believe when Emily Bronte wrote this she was giving an example of an extreme. The pain one would incur from unrequited love and the misery of unchecked revenge. I think she speaks to the sensible side of all who read her works. To caution against foolish inclinations and to show how you should react to situations and what could happen if you reaction is unreasonable. For those of you who have read it, I am comparing Heathcliffe and Cathy with Hareton and young Cathy. For those of you who haven't, just pay attention, look deeper, see what you think. But please, don't take this work as a sad work of fiction, look beyond the surface and see how this could apply to your own life. See how even though things could be unfair, cruel, and hard that life can still be worth living because you never know what could be waiting for you in the end.
PattyTX More than 1 year ago
The reading was a bit hard to follow in the beginning but as I read on and got more aquainted with the characters it began to become easier to read. I read it in two days the book was that good. My first instinct with to loathe Heathcliff and Catherine for there relationship, but in the end I realized that circumstances were hard and that love did win out.
AvidBookworm More than 1 year ago
Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights is my favorite gothic romance classics of all times!

I like the format in which the narration is structured, where the story was shared between Ms. Dean and Lockwood. Bronte did a great job of balancing the narrative in a way where I was never confused on who was telling the story. At times, I sensed Nelly's biased toward certain characters, but her detail and recount was thorough and engaging. Telling it in Nelly and Lockwood's perspective allowed me to see more into the characters and their desires, motives and struggles, even after the climactic event of Catherine's death. This could not have been possible if it was told in Heathcliff or Catherine's perspective.

I noticed throughout the novel how Bronte used parallel elements to compare and contrast people, places and things in her story. For example, Wuthering Heights was painted as an unrefined and dark home, where Thrushgrove Grange was described as polished, gentle and inviting similar to the inhabitants of each residence. In addition, Cathy and young Catherine were different, yet very similar in many ways. She used this style throughout her novel; these are just two examples that help paint a well-rounded picture of the events and the overall storyline.

Most of all, the novel is such a passionate tale of a doomed love between two people who can never be together in their life time. Even though Heathcliff is portrayed as a malicious and vengeful person, my compassion for him never wavered. At times, I found myself being a proponent of his efforts, especially when enacting revenge upon Hindley. He was my favorite character throughout the novel despite his acts because I could sense Heathcliff's passion and true love for Cathy even after her death when he was more determined to pose revenge on those who kept them apart. If it were merely lust for Cathy, his efforts would have ended when she died. This is truly a love story that cannot be fulfilled in their lifetime.

Overall, I was glad to see Bronte structure a happy ending by joining young Catherine and Hareton because in a sense it was like she joined Heathcliff and Catherine and gave them their happy ending.

This is a novel I will read over and over again!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Emily Bronte has written one of the most romantic stories I have ever read in Wuthering Heights, but the beginning is difficult to read and the characters have no redeeming qualities except their love for each other. Htis book is almost obnoxious because the characters are so selfish! However, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is amazing in comparison. I have loved that book forever which is why I read this one. Read this book for the experience and the feeling of accomplishment at the end. THe ending is what gave it 4 stars, in my opinion. Overall it was a good book, just not outstanding.
AndrewWalker More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books I have ever had the pleasure to read. Emily Bronte's masterpiece thoroughly captivated my attention for its entire duration, never dulling for a moment. Without spoiling a plot of epic proportions, it is sufficient to say that this is perhaps the best novel involving tragedy and romance ever written. Character development is wonderfully descriptive in Wuthering Heights, while still being concise and clear in reference to which person is being referred to. The brilliance of the landscape was beautifully portrayed and added considerably to the agenda of the plot. Furthermore, the manner is which the story was told was equally satisfying. Wuthering Heights was an all-around fantastic read. Personally, I can find no faults with it whatsoever. I -highly- suggest this novel for anyone. It will always be an absolute fixture in my library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like the story but the old english makes it hard to follow. I had to read slow and back track constantly & I actually had to put this down for a while because the language was losing my interest. But the story itself is great and it's definitely a classic. So if you can get past the old english than go for it!
Dany_Jaime More than 1 year ago
When I first began reading Wuthering Heights, it seemed like every turning of a page was work, it just simply wasn't what I was expecting. It seemed to lack passion, it was void of any sign of life, but something about it made me keep reading it compulsively. Not until the very end did I encounter the real power of the novel. The magic it holds comes neither from love, nor passion, but from its profound characters. They are ingeniously flawed in a way that enables readers to deeply relate to and even find themselves in them. Heathcliff is the most fascinating character I've ever encountered. He's dark, unsettling, and incredibly selfish and cold, yet his most enthralling quality is that we know he is capable of giving in to temptation and falling in love with Catherine. In contrast, Catherine's vulnerability is what makes her so appealing to us as readers, because we see that she leaps into a love that will eventually consume her. Wuthering Heights is hardly a pretty love story; it's a dark, disturbing tale unraveling around obsession and revenge. It tells of two star crossed loved who ignore their hearts' desires and let their heads get in the way of what fate has in store for them. The story unfolds as an extended flashback through the eyes of Nelly Deans, Catherine's family's maid. The story is about the forbidden love between Catherine and Heathcliff (an orphan Catherine's father picks up off the streets of Liverpool). Although the reader gets a sense that these two are soul mates, Catherine ends up marrying another, hence beginning a treacherous cycle of obsession and revenge that would be bequeathed to the next generation. Personally, I've never come across a more enchanting book that, due to its characters, entangles the reader inside their worlds with incredible intensity and strength. The power of the novel is hidden in its characters and their battle to reach their designated fate against all odds. Wuthering Heights is an intense tale of two flawed individuals trapped in an obsessive love that turns to dark madness. It is an excellently written novel that everyone should read at least once.
I_am_Heathcliff More than 1 year ago
I don't think I can express how much I love this book! Heathcliff and Catherine's love story is so passionate and so much more different than any other I have read. The characters seem so real, it's hard to imagine that they only exist in writing. Every time I read this I find myself falling more and more in love with it--and I catch myself finding things that I missed before. You can't fully appreciate this novel unless you read it more than once! Bronte's writing definitely challenges readers but it is well worth it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! I heard about it in Twilight and couldnt put it down. At first the old fashioned talk was hard to understand but i got used to it soon. I love how unlike in Twilight, there really isnt a happy ending. Heathcliff and Catherine are made for each other but they make each other miserable too. I love how Heathcliff is so unlike Edward in Twilight. I think this book is just as romantic as Twilight but different. Its amazing and everyone should read it!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved to hate Heathcliff. But got a little confused at times by the changing point of view in which it is written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think that this is too mature for a ten year old. It has a hard to follow plot for unexperienced readers, and the vocabulary may be difficult to understand. I would recommend this book for people ages 14 +. This is a very good read, but is not your classic love story. I hope this helps some younger readers decide whether or not to read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great touching story that everyone should read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I purchased this classic book over other less costly ebook editions because it was advertised as including "beautiful illustrations". IT DOES NOT HAVE ANY ILLUSTRATIONS! I was very disappointed, and with ebooks, once you click on "buy", you are stuck with the book! Shame on the publisher for deceptive advertising!
adrienne_marie More than 1 year ago
i read this book because it was never forced in school; so i didn't understand when "bella" would address it in the "twilight" saga. i HAD to understand what she was talking about and why she loved the book SO MUCH. i did love this book, even though it is sick and twisted.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Extremely complex. Almost too complex. I like complex characters, but the storyline is so dense, it is hard to get to know all the characters and keep them straight. Soo much happens in this book. Take it slow and don't try to rush like I had to. I imagine I'd appreciate it more if I had more time to absorb it all. Beautifully written classic of course.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read the book after watching the movie. I found out that the movie has the same name and characters, but otherwise is very different from the book. The book is a very dark story, but extremely interesting and well written.
AngVF More than 1 year ago
This is not the romantic story I was led to believe. Two of the most selfish people with very dark charcteristics. It was however very entertaining.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you like really dark romanticism then this is the book for you!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is fantastic; it is a true classic, and I would recommend it to any who like romantic tragedies with flawed characters. That being said, I would warn any Twilight fans that Wuthering Heights is not an easy read, nor is it a typical 'happy ending' book. I would recommend that you research it more before just buying it, else you might be a bit surprised.
Megan180 More than 1 year ago
I read this book for a school assignment and it was one that I actually really liked! Wuthering Heights has a dynamic plot that spans over a long period of time providing a unique reading experience. Love, Hate and Abuse seem to be common themes throughout the story. It is a classic that can be enjoyed by many different ages. Although there was not a specific lesson taught or reason that the book was written it was very well done and i would recommend it to anyone to likes a good love story with drama. The author creates such passion in each of the characters, it is impossible not to become attatched! Good book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While the writing was eloquent, the characters were selfish, whiny and altogether unlikeable. I'm glad to say i read it, as it is a classic, but i wouldn't necessarily recommend it to anyone.
Nazire More than 1 year ago
I know that many people love this book, I however cannot. I have read this book several times at different points in time. There are many great qualities about the book, just not enough to take it out of the mud for me. The characterization is smart, yet not enough. There are many plot twists, however there is just too many peek-aboos that just doesn't add up and doesn't make sense. It's great to read the descriptions of the England moors, castles and different characters' depictions, unfortunately though depictions alone do not make the story. It's one of those classics that is a must read for the sake of learning that not everything that is written a long time ago is a great book. This I think was a great attempt at a great novel, unfortunately for us readers Bronte fell short of the threshold.
1958MR More than 1 year ago
tough read so far not interesting enough to keep reading