Year of Miss Agnes

Year of Miss Agnes

Paperback(Reprint)

$6.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Want it by Tuesday, October 23  Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.

Overview

Year of Miss Agnes by Kirkpatrick Hill

A year they'll never forget
Ten-year-old Frederika (Fred for short) doesn't have much faith that the new teacher in town will last very long. After all, they never do. Most teachers who come to their one-room schoolhouse in remote, Alaska leave at the first smell of fish, claiming that life there is just too hard.
But Miss Agnes is different -- she doesn't get frustrated with her students, and she throws away old textbooks and reads Robin Hood instead! For the first time, Fred and her classmates begin to enjoy their lessons and learn to read and write -- but will Miss Agnes be like all the rest and leave as quickly as she came?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780689851247
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date: 05/28/2002
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 128
Sales rank: 207,770
Product dimensions: 5.12(w) x 7.62(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile: 790L (what's this?)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Kirkpatrick Hill lives in Fairbanks, Alaska. She was an elementary school teacher for more than thirty years, most of that time in the Alaskan "bush." Hill is the mother of six children and the grandmother of eight. Her three earlier books, Toughboy and Sister, Winter Camp, and The Year of Miss Agnes, have all been immensely popular. Her fourth book with McElderry Books, Dancing at the Odinochka, was a Junior Library Guild Selection. Hill's visits to a family member in jail inspired her to write Do Not Pass Go.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

"What will happen now?" I asked Mamma as we watched the plane take the teacher away.

"Maybe no more school." Mamma twitched her shoulder a little to show she didn't care. Mamma never went to school much, just a few months here and there when her family wasn't trapping or out at spring muskrat camp. She said she hated school when she was little.

The little plane circled our village and then flew low over Andreson's store and waggled its wings at us. That was Sam White, the pilot, saying good-bye to us.

It was Sam White laughing, too. Sam thought nearly everything was funny. He had just landed with the mail and there the new teacher was, waiting for him when he opened the door of the cockpit. She pushed right through the rest of us and started talking before Sam even got to say hello.

"Wait for me, it will only take a minute," she'd said. "Please. Take me back to town. I can't stay in this place for another second."

And he'd waited, and she'd come tumbling out of her little cabin, leaving the door open, leaving everything behind but the two suitcases she carried. It was kind of funny, how she looked. I could tell Sam thought so, the way he winked at us. And then Sam had helped her into the plane and the engine had roared and they were up and over the spruce trees and on their way.

I knew what she would tell Sam. She'd tell how Amy Barrington had got mad and had busted in her door because the teacher bought mukluks from Julia Pitka instead of her. And she'd tell about the big boys who didn't listen. And she'd tell about the fish.

When we brought our lunch to school, it would always be fish. Salmon strips or kk'oontseek, dried fish eggs, to eat on pilot crackers. Or half-dried fish. The oil would get on the little kids' faces and on the desks.

"Heavens, don't you ever eat anything but fish?" And she'd make us go to the basin and try to scrub the fish smell away with lots of Fels Naptha soap, and then with a bad face she'd scrub the oily ring from the washbasin.

That one time, she pushed Plasker away from her desk when she was helping him with his arithmetic.

"You smell of fish," she said, real mad, with her teeth together. Plasker looked scared.

"I was helping my old man bale whitefish," he said. He was pretty nervous, wiping his hands on his pants as if that would help.

The teacher told him to sit down, and she didn't even help him with his arithmetic. There were tears in her eyes. Right there we knew she was not going to stay with us.

We had a whole bunch of teachers since they started the school here, back when I was six. Some left before the year was over. Some stayed one whole school year. But none ever came back after the summer.

Sometimes we could see the look on their faces the first week they were here, cleaning out their little cabin, putting up pictures on the walls. The ones who looked mean from the very first lasted the longest. It was the ones who smiled all the time and pretended to like everything who didn't last.

Maybe they were running out of teachers and we wouldn't get another one.

But in just a week Sam brought us a new teacher.

I was helping Old Man Andreson in the store when Sam came in. It was my job to cross off every day on the calendar with an X so Old Man Andreson wouldn't get mixed up and forget what day it was. And it was the first day of a new month, so I had to tear that last month off, too. October 1, it was now — 1948.

Sam was really big and tall, and when I was little, he always used to lift me up and make my head touch the ceiling. Now I was too big for that, so he just stuck me on top of the counter.

"Fred! I brought you a new teacher. I kidnapped her. What do you think about that?"

I had a bad feeling about that, so I asked him, "Is she nice?"

"Oh-ho," said Sam. "This one's got a little mileage. You kids are not going to get away with nothin'."

That didn't sound like she was going to be nice, so I wiggled down off the counter.

I wanted to go have a look at her.

Copyright © 2000 by Kirkpatrick Hill

Reading Group Guide

ABOUT THE BOOK
Ten-year-old Fred (Frederika) tells the story of school and village life among the Athabascans in Alaska during 1948 when Miss Agnes arrives to be yet another new teacher.
THEMES
Schools; Teachers; Alaska; Indians of North America
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
• Why didn't Fred's mother think school was important?
• Why do you think teachers always wanted to leave the village?
• What are some differences between Fred's school day and yours? Are there any similarities?
ACTIVITIES
• The book is dedicated to Sylvia Ashton-Warner. Research this person.
• Research the Native American groups of Alaska and chart them on a map of Alaska.
• Study the American Sign Language alphabet. Learn signs for words significant to this story.
This reading group guide is for classroom, library, and reading group use. It may be reproduced in its entirety or excerpted for these purposes.
Prepared by Diana Enriquez, Quinton Heights Elementary
© William Allen White Children's Book Award
Please visit http://www.emporia.edu/libsv/wawbookaward/ for more information about the awards and to see curriculum guides for other master list titles.

Introduction

ABOUT THE BOOK

Ten-year-old Fred (Frederika) tells the story of school and village life among the Athabascans in Alaska during 1948 when Miss Agnes arrives to be yet another new teacher.

THEMES

Schools; Teachers; Alaska; Indians of North America

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

• Why didn't Fred's mother think school was important?

• Why do you think teachers always wanted to leave the village?

• What are some differences between Fred's school day and yours? Are there any similarities?

ACTIVITIES

• The book is dedicated to Sylvia Ashton-Warner. Research this person.

• Research the Native American groups of Alaska and chart them on a map of Alaska.

• Study the American Sign Language alphabet. Learn signs for words significant to this story.

This reading group guide is for classroom, library, and reading group use. It may be reproduced in its entirety or excerpted for these purposes.

Prepared by Diana Enriquez, Quinton Heights Elementary

© William Allen White Children's Book Award

Please visit http://www.emporia.edu/libsv/wawbookaward/ for more information about the awards and to see curriculum guides for other master list titles.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Year of Miss Agnes 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
august27 More than 1 year ago
This book will give you a sliver of Alaska history, capturing the challenges of schools in Alaska given the distinct differences between Alaska Native and Western European cultures. A must read for any educator or future educator considering coming to Alaska!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just read The Year of Miss Agnes. Kirkpatrick Hill is a good writer. I just did not like the book. I would recommend it to somebody who would like to read about Alaska, and the places there. The book is about the kids in Alaska that don't like to go to school because they have mean teachers until Miss Agnes comes. The kids think that she is the best teacher until they find out that she is homesick. She left England because of a war and did not go back. The reason I said I did not like the book in the begining is because it is a historical fiction book and I don't like that genre. Now back to the summary! After she did not go back somebody told her the school in town needed a teacher because the other one did not like the kids. That is what the Year of Miss Agnes is about. I did not give away the end so I want you to find out yourself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was read to my 3rd grade class 2 years aho. This is a great book that I would reccomend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
momofareader More than 1 year ago
My son was assigned this book for his enrichment class! Great message about valuing yur education!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OK i gess
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The teachers of this small village aren't very satisfied. But, when Miss Agnes comes along that is about to change. She is Fred's dream teacher and just when she thought things could not get better, Miss Agnes decides to leave. Find out what will happen to Fred and her heart broken class!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Miss Agnes took what it had to really teach "hard to reach children" in a romote town in Alaska. I learned a lot about Alaskan customs (1940's)and ways.I loved the way a deaf child was included in the classroom and all the children learned sign language along with her with pride! This story was believable because it was written by a teacher-author that taught in an Alaskan school house for many years herself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Year of Mrs. Agnes is about Fred and her deaf sister Bokko, who doesn't start school until later in the year. And every year a teacher leaves because of the smell of fish! But then another teacher, Mrs. Agnes, comes and she can't smell. The kids thought Mrs.Agnes was only supposed to stay for a year and go back to England. But when they come back from fish camp, they see something very exciting!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is o.k., but it is pretty good. If your going to read this book you'll like it a little!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay.