You Are Not a Stranger Here

You Are Not a Stranger Here

by Adam Haslett
3.8 31

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Overview

You Are Not a Stranger Here by Adam Haslett

In one of the most acclaimed fiction debuts in years, Adam Haslett explores lives that appear shuttered by loss and discovers entire worlds hidden inside them. An aging inventor, burning with manic creativity, tries to reconcile with his estranged gay son. An orphaned boy draws a thuggish classmate into a relationship of escalating guilt and violence. A genteel middle-aged woman, a long-time resident of a rest home, becomes the confidante of a lovelorn teenaged volunteer. With Chekhovian restraint and compassion, conveying both the sorrow of life and the courage with which people rise to meet it, You Are Not a Stranger Here is a triumph.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780385501675
Publisher: Doubleday Publishing
Publication date: 07/02/2002
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 5.92(w) x 8.53(h) x 0.87(d)

About the Author

Adam Haslett is the author of the novel Imagine Me Gone; the short story collection You Are Not A Stranger Here, which was a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist and which won the PEN/Winship Award; and the novel Union Atlantic, which won the Lambda Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Prize. His books have been translated into eighteen languages, and he has received the Berlin Prize from the American Academy in Berlin, the PEN/Malamud Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations. He lives in New York City.

Hometown:

New York, New York

Date of Birth:

December 24, 1970

Place of Birth:

Porchester, New York

Education:

B.A., Swarthmore College, 1993; M.F.A., Iowa Writers¿ Workshop, 1999; J.D., Yale Law School, graduating May 2003

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You Are Not a Stranger Here 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a book full of amazing, character-driven stories. The prose is beautiful, but not in a 'look how clever I am at writing' kind of way. It's beautiful in that it truly lets you get into the hearts and minds of the characters. It's obvious the author loves his characters. He knows them well enough to know their flaws, and their reasons and goodness within and in spite of those flaws. It's a beautiful empathy with pain of ordinary existence. Most of the negative reviews I see have to do with the lack of action and the depressing settings. It's true. This book is not something to read on the beach or if you dislike character-driven stories. That does not, however, make it a bad book -- what the author sets out to do, he does excellently. I've yet to see his equal. However, if you don't enjoy that type of writing generally, you probably won't enjoy it this time around either. Also, it is definitely a book I CAN put down and come back to. It isn't something you'll stay up all night dying to finish. The beauty of it is that even though I can put it down, I can't stop myself from coming back to it. Re-reading it, re-learning these characters.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Before I begin, I freely admit that I come to stories hoping to be entertained by way of vicarious living; I'm looking for an escape. Haslett's book offered nothing but depressing settings, dull characters, and stories that I ultimately didn't care about. Seldom do I ever put down a book--I should have dropped this one. If you're looking for a great story to escape with, avoid this book.
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Camboron More than 1 year ago
Sometimes, while reading this book, I had to laugh, or else I would have to go as far down and deep into the emotions and happenings in this mini-novels. When people talk about painting, and how a few strokes can create or suggest forms, landscapes, I haven't really seen that in art as much as I thought I would. But, it is realized here in these stories. I think I'm not a good enough writer to even critique these stories. Some people won't watch certain intense movies, despite their amazingness, like Misery or Silence of the Lambs. I think, due to some of the subject matter of these stories, others might have the same reaction. But, these stories, I would hand out to passersby on the street, if I had enough copies. I would beg them to read them, even if they found some of the themes repulsive. These stories deserved every accolade put upon them. Can't wait to read something else from this gentleman.
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anonymous67 More than 1 year ago
This book is depressing and full of unlikeable, deeply flawed characters. The short stories are clearly written, but offer little reason to read further than the first chapter.
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theshippingnews More than 1 year ago
I don't see the reasons for the critical acclaim this book got. I think it's well-written and some of the characters are truly interesting, but it isn't a great book. The language is simple and direct, which I like, but it isn't especially graceful or powerful. If the book has any power, it's in its conviction that life is desperate and useless. How powerful a conclusion is that really?
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Guest More than 1 year ago
so unpretentious. insightful and witty. well-balanced. true. human. it's not about the stories' subjects and heroes' strange life stories, it is about the acceptance of people, characters, choices, and acceptance of the fact not being able to do or undertake anything. and about all that being perfectly all-right.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I can give Haslett credit for originality, but these depressing stories about people living dismal lives on the edge just don't merit the enthusiasm of the critics. I was happy to put it into my bag of books destined for a charity sale.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My favorite collection of short stories. Haslett's clean ( that is, free of melodrama) style of writing allows for these sad and funny (dark humor) stories to shine. I can only hope the author is working on more stories or a novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While some may overlook this debut as nothing but a collection of short stories others will find it a remarkable look at the human experience of life and love. The stories are touching, honest and at times heartbreaking. Haslett has a true understanding of Chekhovian insight into why we love and why we lose. A triumph.