Audiobook(MP3 on CD - MP3 - Unabridged CD)

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Overview

"Beautiful, brainy, and offbeat" (Entertainment Weekly), a perfect sophisticated summer read.

By turns funny, charming, and tragic, Rosecrans Baldwin's debut novel introduces leading Alzheimer's researcher Dr. Victor Aaron, who spends his days alternating between long hours in the lab and running through memories of his late wife, Sara. He's preserved their marriage as a perfect, if tumultuous, duet between two opposite but compatible souls. Until the day he discovers a series of index cards in Sara's handwriting that chronicle the major "changes in direction of their marriage." Suddenly this eminent memory expert finds his faith in memory itself unraveling, and he must, along with his support network of strong women-from his lab assistant to Aunt Betsy, the doddering doyenne of the island where they all live-determine a way to move on.

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400167715
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 08/12/2010
Edition description: MP3 - Unabridged CD
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Rosecrans Baldwin is a founding editor of the popular website The Morning News, host of the annual “Tournament of Books.” His work has appeared in New York Magazine, The Nation, on NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and he currently writes “The Digital Ramble,” for The Moment, a New York Times blog. He lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina with his wife.

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From the Publisher

"Baldwin's prose is wise and nimble, clever without being self-conscious, true to the myriad voices of his characters." —-Washington Post

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You Lost Me There 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
SAHARATEA More than 1 year ago
Bruce Willis. Die Hard. "Moonlighting" How often do you run into Mr. Willis and his oeuvre in literary fiction? He may not appear frequently (maybe not at all) yet he fits in perfectly with this substantial and insightful novel about memor by Rosecrans Baldwin. You Lost Me There is a complicated story, with twists and surprises and feinted paths, as well as scientific details about disease and the research to fight it. Beyond the serious details, it is a fun novel as well, thus Bruce Willis references prevail throughout the story and with surprising relevancy. "Years in the past, someone thought my wife was a knockout, one night long ago in a restaurant. A night I didn't remember." So realizes Victor Aaron, a brilliant scientist who is now realizing just how ignorant he's been. In the time since his wife's fatal car accident, he's been lost and unable to find his way, too young to retire but too old to feel any real enthusiasm for his life or work. As a scientist researching Alzheimer's disease, he's enthralled with the concept of memory and works to find a cure. His work gives him opportunities to study case histories on how the brain is wired, and the novel doesn't hesitate to dip into scientific explanations. That the memory specialist is unable to recall much about his wife, anything accurate, is a puzzle he needs to solve. He stumbles upon note cards that his wife had written, as suggested by a marriage counselor they had hired, in an effort to stall what appeared to be an inevitable divorce. Their marriage had become a quiet battle of pathos versus logos, with a bit of ethos thrown in by crazy Aunt Betsy. Aunt Betsy appears to be the voice of balance in the novel, even though she is described by Victor as "an amateur anthropologist. [who] studied misbehavior. She tracked her stories doggedly and did not hesitate to use them." Victor is most astonished by how his wife Sara describes him in her note cards: "He was so focused on research and making a name for himself that we were landlocked by his lab schedule, him at sea and me in the window." She had a successful career, as did he, they were wealthy, and he didn't see a problem in their marriage that couldn't be fixed without him simply apologizing. That his apologies were vague and noncommittal didn't occur to him, and as he continues to read her notes he realizes how differently he and she had interpreted significant events in their lives. However, the story doesn't limit itself to their marital discord, which would probably be a really sappy novel that would ultimately be a bore, and then a television movie. Instead, Baldwin goes deeper into what memories Victor has, from a childhood friend's suicide to his closest friend's obvious creepiness. It's as if seeing his wife Sara's version of himself has freed him to reexamine himself from other angles. Yet you can't be lulled into thinking this is a fable that ends with everyone awakened to their flaws and eager to change. Can you change who you are if you can't remember what you've been? Baldwin creates a thriller-like pace, and he weaves in details such as the "We Will Never Forget" bumper stickers of 9/11, and how in placing them on cars, people are essentially admitting that they need to be reminded.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You Lost Me There is a stunning debut for Rosecrans Baldwin. His book captures the emotional feel of a man who has discovered, too late, that his marriage was not has he remembered. As a scientist, I also greatly appreciate the detail with which Baldwin renders the scientific process (which is usually treated quite superficially). Highly recommended.
LBanks More than 1 year ago
Just finished reading You Lost Me There. I loved this book. This made me want to board a plane immediately to Mt Dessert Island and track down Aunt Betsy for a cocktail down by the docks. Victor makes a very interesting narrator as he has such an analytical mind. The love story between him and his dead wife struck me as truly authentic. You can almost hear the characters speaking aloud as you read as they seem to be real people. Especially Aunt Betsy, she was a hoot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've been a big fan of TheMorningNews.org for a long time and have been really looking forward to reading Rosecrans Baldwin's first novel. I'm pleased to say that all the hype is real - this novel doesn't disappoint. It's funny, poignant, and full of well-crafted characters that stuck with me long after I'd finished reading.
Course8 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rosecrans Baldwin has crafted a story of loss and coping and memory and mis-remembering. He tells the story of Victor Aarons, a researcher who is seeking clues to a cure for Alzheimer's disease. His wife, Sara died in an auto accident several years ago yet Victor is still not able to effectively deal with the loss or his life. He buttresses his days with people who are equally fractured - a girlfriend who is a researcher but also tries her hand at both poetry and burlesque fantasies, a crotchety aunt-in-law, a god-daughter with a ivy-league education who can't figure out what to do and plays at being a chef. It took a while for me to develop an appreciation for this story. I wanted to know more about Sara but Victor's memories of their marriage do not have fidelity with notes that she wrote as part of a counseling exercise. So he is an unreliable narrator. I wanted to know more about Victor's relationships but he is blinded to the subtleties of interaction and conversational clues. So his interactions with coworker Lucy, his girlfriend Regina, and his goddaughter Cornelia often are near-misses and truncated. However, as more of Victor's backstory is filled in, partly by those notes from his wife and partly by his dogged efforts to dredge up some accurate memories, it becomes more apparent that he is struggling to simply make it through each day. Long work hours, wine, Ambien, long swims, none of this cna assuage his grief. And he is not willing or able to confront his feelings directly. I am not sure why the various women in his life tolerate him. He was unable to recognize, much less express, his feelings for either Sara or Regina. He is not supportive to Lucy and he is only slightly better to Aunt Betsy than her estranged son. At times he is downright creepy with Cornelia, his goddaughter.In summary, this is an interesting read that is redeemed by the beginning of closure that Victor eventually achieves. However I do wonder if his life after the final page will be much of an improvement or if he will revert to coasting on the surface, never diving deep.
khager on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Victor is an Alzheimer's researcher so it's not a stretch to say that memory is his life. So when he finds index cards that his late wife wrote, he's shocked to learn that she saw their life together a lot differently than he did--and she remembers key events in their relationship differently, as well.This is a hard book to review because it's a very good book but not one that I particularly enjoyed. I didn't really like Victor. I did like Sara (the wife) but, while she's essential to the plot in a lot of ways, her voice stays on the edges.But I don't want to discourage anyone from reading this, because I think a lot of people would absolutely love this book.
bearette24 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I didn't like this book. I wanted to. It was well-written. But I didn't like any of the characters except Regina. And she got screwed in the end. Basically, this is a lot of navel-gazing by a depressed character who refuses to help himself get better. And I would say he is slightly autistic as well. Maybe more than slightly. This book definitely validates my preference for female authors.
BlackSheepDances on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Bruce Willis. Die Hard. "Moonlighting"How often do you run into Mr. Willis and his oeuvre in literary fiction? He may not appear frequently (maybe not at all) yet he fits in perfectly with this substantial and insightful novel about memor by Rosecrans Baldwin. You Lost Me There is a complicated story, with twists and surprises and feinted paths, as well as scientific details about disease and the research to fight it. Beyond the serious details, it is a fun novel as well, thus Bruce Willis references prevail throughout the story and with surprising relevancy.¿Years in the past, someone thought my wife was a knockout, one night long ago in a restaurant. A night I didn¿t remember.¿So realizes Victor Aaron, a brilliant scientist who is now realizing just how ignorant he¿s been. In the time since his wife¿s fatal car accident, he¿s been lost and unable to find his way, too young to retire but too old to feel any real enthusiasm for his life or work. As a scientist researching Alzheimer¿s disease, he¿s enthralled with the concept of memory and works to find a cure. His work gives him opportunities to study case histories on how the brain is wired, and the novel doesn¿t hesitate to dip into scientific explanations. That the memory specialist is unable to recall much about his wife, anything accurate, is a puzzle he needs to solve.He stumbles upon note cards that his wife had written, as suggested by a marriage counselor they had hired, in an effort to stall what appeared to be an inevitable divorce. Their marriage had become a quiet battle of pathos versus logos, with a bit of ethos thrown in by crazy Aunt Betsy. Aunt Betsy appears to be the voice of balance in the novel, even though she is described by Victor as ¿an amateur anthropologist¿ [who] studied misbehavior. She tracked her stories doggedly and did not hesitate to use them.¿ Victor is most astonished by how his wife Sara describes him in her note cards: ¿He was so focused on research and making a name for himself that we were landlocked by his lab schedule, him at sea and me in the window.¿ She had a successful career, as did he, they were wealthy, and he didn¿t see a problem in their marriage that couldn¿t be fixed without him simply apologizing. That his apologies were vague and noncommittal didn¿t occur to him, and as he continues to read her notes he realizes how differently he and she had interpreted significant events in their lives. However, the story doesn¿t limit itself to their marital discord, which would probably be a really sappy novel that would ultimately be a bore, and then a television movie. Instead, Baldwin goes deeper into what memories Victor has, from a childhood friend¿s suicide to his closest friend¿s obvious creepiness. It¿s as if seeing his wife Sara¿s version of himself has freed him to reexamine himself from other angles. Yet you can¿t be lulled into thinking this is a fable that ends with everyone awakened to their flaws and eager to change. Can you change who you are if you can't remember what you've been?¿I didn¿t want to remember that evening ever again. Wipe the synapses clean with some scotch and a hard sleep.¿ Baldwin creates a thriller-like pace, and he weaves in details such as the ¿We Will Never Forget¿ bumper stickers of 9/11, and how in placing them on cars, people are essentially admitting that they need to be reminded. Victor admits to not remembering the name of a movie that was the centerpiece of their first date, and Baldwin uses this to contrast how there are often so many little things we remember while the more important details slip away. Even more fascinating, though, is how Baldwin portrays different characters in the phases of wanting to remember or trying to forget. Because this doesn¿t attempt to sew up all the details neatly, it would probably be a great film. I¿d bet the movie rights are already sold. The question is, is there a role for Bruce Willis?
LaurenAileen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Victor, a prominent Alzheimer¿s researcher is dealing with the aftermath of his wife Sara¿s death in a tragic car accident. Sara, a screenwriter and author had been encouraged by her therapist to highlight five changes of direction in their marriage. She only finishes four before her accident, and Victor finds them years later. When he reads the note cards, he realizes that his memories are vastly different than those of his dead wife. The purpose being- for an Alzheimer¿s researcher specializing in memory (or lack thereof) this must be devastating.If this was the point of the book, it was buried. I didn¿t feel the sense of a man devastated over losing his wife. He describes her nearly every time in a negative light- saying she caused arguments, that her memories are wrong, wondering if she had an affair, calling her success a fluke, calling her privileged, saying he never felt up to her standards¿ Instead, he replaces her with a multitude of women, all unlikeable. Regina (whom he speaks of loving and caring about much more adamantly than he ever does about his wife) a bratty, much younger burlesque dancer who comes off as annoying, aggressive, ignorant, and unsympathetic. Betsy, Sara¿s aunt, an old gossip who desperately seeks attention at the expense of others. Lucy, his lab partner, who spends more time complaining about men and making mistakes in their research than caring about what she does. Lastly, Connie, his god daughter who is a spoiled, bratty, rude, mess of a girl who complains about everything in sight but does nothing about it. Sara herself is incredibly bright, witty, and likeable in her own writing, but the reader has been conditioned to dislike her because of Victor¿s memories of her. Victor himself is boring, indecisive, and borderline obsessed with Regina. Wimpy describes him best. In the end, Victor himself comes to a number of conclusions- none of which are prominent in the book (Regina really DID love me- despite her other boyfriends, demure attitude, and general annoyance with me! I never grieved for my wife properly, which is why I¿m so out of control- despite thinking she was self-centered, untalented, spoiled, and never caring to contact her during our separation, then falling in love with a much younger woman and speaking of her much more highly than my dead wife!)Despite all of this, I actually still really liked the plot of the book. I thought it was interesting, and the book was undoubtedly well-written. I just wish he had some positive female characters, or featured Sara more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Boring. Uninteresting. All of the inner dialogue got to be too much, too sad. I read to be uplifted, not to be dragged down. I didn't finish it.
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