Zelda: A Biography

Zelda: A Biography

by Nancy Milford
3.6 25

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Overview

Zelda: A Biography by Nancy Milford

Zelda Sayre started out as a Southern beauty, became an international wonder, and died by fire in a madhouse. With her husband, F. Scott Fitzgerald, she moved in a golden aura of excitement, romance, and promise. The epitome of the Jazz Age, they rode the crest of the era to its collapse and their own.

As a result of years of exhaustive research, Nancy Milford brings alive the tormented, elusive personality of Zelda and clarifies as never before her relationship with Scott Fitzgerald. Zelda traces the inner disintegration of a gifted, despairing woman, torn by the clash between her husband’s career and her own talent.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062032461
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 04/30/2013
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 159,464
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Nancy Milford holds both an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Columbia University where Zelda was her dissertation. She has held a Guggenheim Fellowship in Biography, and has served on the boards of the Authors Guild, the Society of American Historians, and the Writers Room, of which she is a founder. Her most recent book is Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay. She lives in Manhattan.

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Zelda 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
lesslie More than 1 year ago
I never thought I'd even want to read about Zelda Fitzgerald because I read all about Hemingway first and he didn't like her and I admit that influenced my opinion of her. Then one day I read that she died in a fire in mental hospital. That piqued my interest so I bought the book and am glad to say was not disappointed. I still don't "like" Zelda, but do understand her as a person more because of this extremely detailed book. It is one of the better biographies I've ever read. F.Scott Fitzgerald is part of the package of course. After reading Zelda, I don't feel the need to read his bio, Nancy Milford has told me everything I ever wanted to know about him too. I like reading about the 20's and all those glamourous Americans abroud in the years between the wars. This book gives you all the details, and I was not surprised at all that none of them really had as grand a time as the pictures make it look. What a price they all paid for all the debauchery. I liked the book, it provoked a sense of pity for this fragile, mentally ill china doll that was Zelda. I won't read it again, not because it's not good, but because it is more of an educational book than one I turn to for pleasure. It is the most thourough book I've read on life between the wars.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Love the writings of Scott Fitzgerald and have always heard rumor of Zelda and their tragic romance which sounded intriguing to me so I decided to read this book. It was very interested and written very well, except that there were many things that I did not understand about Zelda after I finished reading the book; mainly, how did she start out being such a strong person and then finally end up in the state that she was in. The book did not make that clear to me, I was able to speculate a lot of reasons why this may have come about from the information that she gave but was never clear about it. None-the-less, I did enjoy the book, interesting whether you are interested in the Fitzgerald's, women's topics, that certain era in history, or just a good story, this book would fulfill any of those need.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Once again, Mitford does not disappoint. I picked this up casually as I am teaching a bit of Fitzgerald (F. Scott, that is) and thought it might provide interesting insight into the work. Finding that I just couldn't put it down, I read it in two sittings. While Mitford tries valiently to remain neutral, the conclusions one must of necessity draw from the facts she persuasively sets forth puts an entirely new face on the canon and renders the Fitzgerald's decline and early deaths far more understandable. I found the portions dealing with Hemingway of particular interest. An excellent read, hugely interesting to those who read and study the Fizgeralds' work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Scott and Zelda were the ¿it couple¿ of the twenties. Milford uses both narrative and the selected writings of both the Fitzgeralds to paint a marriage that is glamorous and troubled from the beginning to each of these stars tragic ends. High recommended for any fan of F. Scott Fitzgerald, women¿s studies or for those wanting a glimpse into a vanished age.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
They were a couple with similiar demons. Doomed from the day they married, they fed off each other. The book was slow moving and certainly could have done without most of the letters, which were bizarre.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nancy Milford always does well researched bios and Zelda is no exception. She recreates Zelda,s world with interviews from many people who knew Zelda and Scott personally. Fascinating read which takes you back to the twenties and beyond. Some of the writings of Zelda are given and while not always interesting are a look into a brilliant mind that was very ill.
Link0 More than 1 year ago
Zelda was a deeply tortured soul. The author (Nancy Milford) brings her story to life in a breathtaking way.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i actually picked up this book at random... and couldn't put it down. the excerpts from zelda's letters and writing are amazing. it was interesting to hear the back-story to some of the greatest books of all time.
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BettyF More than 1 year ago
In fact, it was so uninteresting that I read only enough to find out I didn't like it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
... somewhat interesting but wouldn't recommend it to a friend
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this years ago, and I am delighted it's available on the Nook. It is a well-researched biography and also a good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not what I expected. Kind of long and drawn out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
From the author of the recent award-winning, best-selling Savage Beauty (a bio of Edna St. Vincent Millay), this is the exhaustively researched story of the original flapper. Zelda's life reads like fiction. But how else could it read considering she was the tortured wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald? That's not to say that Scott wasn't a little tortured himself. It's no use debating who drove who to destruction. You have only to read a bit of Fitzgerald to solve that mystery.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Only great will power to attend AAA has really helped many. How much this has impaired creativety no one knows what might have been. She seemed to be bi polar which is still in women difficult to balance drug management. The old pirates song of treasure island " drink and the devil have done for the rest" what they missed was a firm grasp of reality and common sense. A pity of wasted life and books becoming more dated.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Zelda wrote ,but not well enough to be published,or successsful. This book recaps the smallest details of all of these stories from a very mentally ill Zelda. The reading is tedious! Zeldas illness may have been one of the most important factors in Scots being such a great writer. I would not read this unless you love Fitzgerald!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Go to next res
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im going to my dads so i wont b on for a week bye.