Bear and Bee

Overview

After a nice long hibernation, Bear wakes up and craves some honey. When he spots a beehive in the distance, he heads right for it! Sitting on top of the beehive is Bee who graciously offers Bear some honey, but Bear is worried. He believes that bees are big, scary creatures who do not share their honey. But Bear's new friend just happens to be a bee! And Bee is small and most certainly is not scary. But do bees share honey? Turns out they do!

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Overview

After a nice long hibernation, Bear wakes up and craves some honey. When he spots a beehive in the distance, he heads right for it! Sitting on top of the beehive is Bee who graciously offers Bear some honey, but Bear is worried. He believes that bees are big, scary creatures who do not share their honey. But Bear's new friend just happens to be a bee! And Bee is small and most certainly is not scary. But do bees share honey? Turns out they do!

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Pamela Paul
Sergio Ruzzier's illustrations always manage to be soft and fluffy and kind toward children—without slipping into saccharine gauziness.
Publishers Weekly
Bear has never seen a bee, but he doesn’t like them and has no doubt they don’t play well with others. “Bees are terrible monsters!” Bear says. “They are big, and they have large teeth, and they have sharp claws, and they never share their honey!” Luckily, Bee, who is standing right in front of Bear as he unfurls this lurid fantasy, seizes this as a teachable moment, and points out that Bear actually has many of the qualities that he ascribes to bees. After some momentary confusion (“Poor me! I’m a Bee!” wails Bear, flinging himself to the ground in despair), the two become honey-sharing buddies. Ruzzier’s (Tweak Tweak) cartooned pen-and-ink drawings are a bit underwhelming; the relatively minimal backgrounds only emphasize the weak characterizations (the characters’ facial expressions are tepid, and putting Bee in high top sneakers is no substitute for giving him a personality). But Ruzzier has a solid sense of comic timing and proffers his lesson on the folly of prejudice with an admirably light touch. Ages 2–5. Agent: George Nicholson, Sterling Lord Literistic. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Kourtnee C. Anderson
A hungry bear meets a bee that offers him some honey. Recounting the things that he has heard about bees, Bear makes clear that he is terrified of bees. Bear mentions that bees have several qualities that he has himself. Bear thinks he is a bee based on those qualities, but bee informs him that he is not a bee. He is a Bear. The illustrations throughout the book have been drawn with an ink pen and filled with pastel colors. Illustrator Ruzzier makes Bear large to emphasize the size difference between him and the bee. Despite this difference, the two of them get along quite well. The short and simple words make this an easy read for beginners. The ending of the story shows a well-developed friendship. Reviewer: Kourtnee C. Anderson; Ages 3 to 5.
School Library Journal
PreS-K—Bear has never seen bees before but he describes them as terrible monsters. "They are big, and they have large teeth, and they have sharp claws, and they never share their honey!" Bear learns to appreciate the qualities of bees (and bears) when he unexpectedly meets one for the first time. The bee points out that Bear has described himself, leaving him in despair until Bee reveals his own identity. Their humorous conversation, which remedies Bear's prejudice, ends with a shared meal of honey between two new friends. Digitally colored pen-and-ink illustrations depict close-ups of the characters against a simple spring background of turquoise skies, yellow-green grass, and sprightly flowers. The minimal text is comprised of dialogue between the two characters. Expressive words appear in boldface type. The starry scene at the end of the book makes this story a good choice for bedtime as well.—Tanya Boudreau, Cold Lake Public Library, AB, Canada
Kirkus Reviews
When a bear wakes up hungry from his winter nap, a beehive and its honey seem to be the perfect answer to his problem--but what about the bee? While Bear has never seen a bee, he knows they "are terrible monsters! They are big, and they have large teeth, and they have sharp claws, and they never share their honey!" He explains this to a nearby bee. (The "bees" Bear imagines are green alien-looking creatures sporting horns and curling proboscises.) But as Bee points out, one quality per spread, Bear shares all those characteristics with bees, at which point Bear dissolves into tears: He's a bee! Bee quickly corrects Bear's mistake and reveals what he is, lack of teeth and claws and all. And as for sharing honey…he is happy to. Short sentences with simple vocabulary and lots of repetition make this a good choice for beginning readers, who can use the illustrations' clues to puzzle out more challenging words. Front endpapers and the dedication and copyright pages make a pleasing visual beginning to this story. Best of all, Ruzzier's pacing is impeccable, adding to the suspense of Bear's discovery and the sweet start of the duo's friendship. The digitally colored pen-and-ink illustrations are simple and uncluttered, keeping the focus on the two expressive friends and making this a great choice for sharing with groups. The correction of misconceptions has never been so much fun. (Picture book. 2-5)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781423159575
  • Publisher: Disney Press
  • Publication date: 3/19/2013
  • Series: Bear and Bee Series
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 161,713
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Sergio Ruzzier (http://ruzzier.com/) won the Parents' Choice Award in 2004 for his work in, Why Mole Shouted and Other Stories and has been awarded by Society of Illustrators, Society of Publication Designers, American Illustration and Communication Arts. Ruzzier has worked for many national and international magazines and book publishers, creating comic strips for Italian magazines such as Linus and Lupo Alberto Magazine. He currently lives in New York.

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