Death: The High Cost of Living

Death: The High Cost of Living

4.4 15
by Neil Gaiman, Chris Bachalo, Mark Buckingham
     
 

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From the pages of Neil Gaiman's SANDMAN comes the young, pale, perky, and genuinely likable Death. One day in every century, Death walks the Earth to better understand those to whom she will be the final visitor. Today is that day. As a young mortal girl named Didi, Death befriends a teenager and helps a 250-year old homeless woman find her missing heart. What follows

Overview

From the pages of Neil Gaiman's SANDMAN comes the young, pale, perky, and genuinely likable Death. One day in every century, Death walks the Earth to better understand those to whom she will be the final visitor. Today is that day. As a young mortal girl named Didi, Death befriends a teenager and helps a 250-year old homeless woman find her missing heart. What follows is a sincere musing on love, life and (of course) death.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The High Cost of Living is a continuation of Harvey Award-winning fantasy writer Gaiman's series detailing the cosmic duties of a loose family of seven immortals. Not quite Gods, they embody realms of psychic experience: Dream, Desire, Despair, Destiny, Delirium, Destruction and Gaiman's very popular character, Death. Reaper, yes; but Death's not very grim as she goes about her business visiting the just-about-to-die and ushering them into their new existence. In this story she meets Sexton, a teenager contemplating suicide, and they end up searching New York City to find a witch's heart (the old hag hid it centuries ago, it's a witch tradition), so the old girl can hide it again. Up pops the Eremite, an evil wizard type, out to steal Death's mysterious necklace, who makes the usual threats against life and limb. Gaiman has created a character sweetly at odds with her modbid duties; dressed like a Satanic rocker, she's as pretty as a cheerleader and even more upbeat. While Gaiman brings a gritty urban contemporaneity to the fantasy genre, the story also suffers from a TV script-like sensibility--danger-defying quips, the good-hearted overweight black neighbor, melodramatic villain. Nevertheless the combination of wry mystic immortal and MTV slacker produces an engaging chemistry. Top-notch production, and although the illustration is a bit stiff, it's stylishly rendered and very nicely colored. The introduction is by pop singer Tori Amos. (Apr.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781563891335
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
06/28/1994
Series:
Death Series
Pages:
104
Product dimensions:
6.62(w) x 10.13(h) x 0.21(d)
Age Range:
17 - 18 Years

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4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a beautiful piece of work. Is somehow less dark and less violent than Gaiman's work on The Sandman, but not less compelling. The story is well crafted and so fresh and original, it will feel like the characters are almost intimate. The character of Death brings a message that completely antagonizes with the western perspective of what death is. By the end of the book, your perspective on life changes, and definitely for the best.
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martinkorben More than 1 year ago
I loved this book -- I read it when I was 13 years old and 13 years later here it is again, looking at me through my computer screen.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read quite a bit of Neil Gaiman's books and this is one of my favorites.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Never read Neil Gaiman before, but I remember always hearing good stuff about this one so I gave it a try. I have to agree with the reviewers here... this is a very interesting read, and the character of Death, as portrayed here, is pretty irresistably cute. I would think that this would be a good tpb to introduce anyone into Gaiman's work or comics in general, simply because it is so well-written. Also, the artwork of Chris Bachalo is gorgeous here as always and fits the tale perfectly. Highly recommended tpb.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A must read for any Neil Gaiman fans
Guest More than 1 year ago
Death, a 16 year old girl for a day, romps through the city -- changing the lives of others, most notably that of Sexton Furnival. She shows us the brightness of death rather than its darkness, and this view of death is something most of us need to hear.