Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock

Hardcover (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$12.31
(Save 53%)
Est. Return Date: 06/15/2014
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$22.36
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$16.77
(Save 35%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 80%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (25) from $5.00   
  • New (12) from $5.20   
  • Used (13) from $5.00   

Overview

The names Elizabeth Eckford and Hazel Bryan Massery may not be well known, but the image of them from September 1957 surely is: a black high school girl, dressed in white, walking stoically in front of Little Rock Central High School, and a white girl standing directly behind her, face twisted in hate, screaming racial epithets. This famous photograph captures the full anguish of desegregation—in Little Rock and throughout the South—and an epic moment in the civil rights movement.

In this gripping book, David Margolick tells the remarkable story of two separate lives unexpectedly braided together. He explores how the haunting picture of Elizabeth and Hazel came to be taken, its significance in the wider world, and why, for the next half-century, neither woman has ever escaped from its long shadow. He recounts Elizabeth’s struggle to overcome the trauma of her hate-filled school experience, and Hazel’s long efforts to atone for a fateful, horrible mistake. The book follows the painful journey of the two as they progress from apology to forgiveness to reconciliation and, amazingly, to friendship. This friendship foundered, then collapsed—perhaps inevitably—over the same fissures and misunderstandings that continue to permeate American race relations more than half a century after the unforgettable photograph at Little Rock. And yet, as Margolick explains, a bond between Elizabeth and Hazel, silent but complex, endures.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Vanity Fair contributing editor Margolick (Beyond Glory) brings his considerable skill to telling a tale many may, mistakenly, think they already know. Bound together in the iconic photograph of the integration of Little Rock's Central High School in which the white Hazel Bryan is caught screaming epithets at the stoic black student, Elizabeth Eckford, the two women went on different paths charted by this sympathetic and readable dual biography. Elizabeth survived the horrendous harassment of her high school years, and the lavish attention upon the Little Rock Nine, followed by a difficult early adulthood. While Hazel's high school years, spent in anonymity at another school, are more halcyon, her early adult years are difficult as well. For both young women, the experience and the photograph that was to follow them were transformative. Margolick pays particularly insightful attention to the photographs and media coverage stimulated not only by the event but all the ensuing anniversaries. As Margolick moves through Elizabeth's days at Central High with new and meticulous detail, he gives Hazel a young life as well before turning to the separate years before they actually meet. Here Margolick's book becomes utterly engrossing, for it touches on a variety of thorny, provocative themes: the power of race, the nature of friendship, the role of personality, the capacity for brutality and for forgiveness. (Sept.)
Booklist

“A very nuanced analysis of how Elizabeth and Hazel were affected by the scene that made them famous . . . A complex look at two women at the center of a historic moment.”—Booklist, starred review
Boston Globe

“Surprising, disturbing, occasionally inspiring, often baffling, and ultimately sad. . . . Elizabeth and Hazel represents, in microcosm, the debilitating power of race that remains powerful 50 years after that photo. . . . An amazing story, told with brio.”—Boston Globe
Christian Science Monitor

“An amazingly intimate portrait. . . . The lesson of Elizabeth and Hazel may be that we shouldn’t define other people’s lives by one single moment. Instead, we can use their actions to define other lives—our own.”—Christian Science Monitor
Huffington Post - Jesse Kornbluth

"[Margolick] tells a story that is almost novelistic in its complexity. . . . Someday Elizabeth and Hazel will be a textbook. Long before, on the civil rights bookshelf, it will be considered a classic.”—Jesse Kornbluth, Headbutler.com, Huffington Post
TheAtlantic.com - Kate Tuttle

“Margolick’s unforgettable new book, Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock, takes as its touchstone a famous civil rights-era photograph. . . . eloquently chronicl[ing] their lives since that iconic photo was taken.”—Kate Tuttle, TheAtlantic.com
The Daily Beast

“The remarkable story of a historic civil-rights photograph and the intertwined lives of its subjects.”—The Daily Beast
The New York Times Book Review - Amy Finnerty

"A patient and evenhanded account of their messy relationship over the decades. . . . Margolick proposes no fairy-tale resolutions to such moral impasses. To his credit, he spares us none of the unruly facts as his subjects, still wrestling with history, wander off message."—Amy Finnerty, The New York Times Book Review
President Bill Clinton

"The iconic image of Elizabeth and Hazel at age fifteen showed us the terrible burden that nine young Americans had to shoulder to claim our nation's promise of equal opportunity. The pain it caused was deeply personal. David Margolick now tells us the amazing story of how Elizabeth and Hazel, as adults, struggled to find each other across the racial divide and in so doing, end their pain and find a measure of peace. We all need to know about Elizabeth and Hazel."—President Bill Clinton
David Levering Lewis

"David Margolick's dual biography of an iconic photograph is a narrative tour de force that leaves us to grapple with a disturbing perennial—that forgiveness doesn't always follow from understanding. I read Elizabeth and Hazel straight through in one sitting."—David Levering Lewis, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of W. E. B. Du Bois
Julian Bond

"The iconic photograph of Hazel Bryan and Elizabeth Eckford has now riveted us for more than fifty years. David Margolick's effort to bring the photo to life is equally riveting. It makes for a deeply compelling story of race and our ongoing efforts at understanding."—Julian Bond, Chairman Emeritus, NAACP
Diane McWhorter

"Elizabeth and Hazel is a story that has been crying out to be told ever since two teenaged girls stumbled into history on a street in Little Rock, more than a half-century ago. Once again, Margolick, one of our best reporters, reveals his remarkable gift for uncovering intimate disputes that illuminate an epoch."—Diane McWhorter, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama; The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution
Louis Begley

"The story of Elizabeth Eckford, the heroic poster child of the struggle to desegregate Little Rock’s Central High, which so many have forgotten, and her tormentor, Hazel Bryan, which so few ever knew, needed to be told. David Margolick has done so masterfully, in a narrative so gripping that one has difficulty putting down his book before arriving at the last page. His Elizabeth and Hazel is required reading for every American who wants to understand why the wounds inflicted by the heritage of slavery and Jim Crow remain unhealed."—Louis Begley, author of Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters
Charlayne Hunter-Gault

“As David Margolick’s brilliantly layered exposition reveals, plumbing ‘the depths of the depths’ of race and racism is a most complex exercise. And as I plumbed the depths of his narrative, I found it at once painful, as well as elevating, and unlike anything I’ve ever read on the subject. It should be required reading for a nation still struggling with what Margolick refers to as ‘the thicket of race.’”—Charlayne Hunter-Gault, author of In My Place
Rachel Cohen
"As surprising and unusual as its two protagonists, Elizabeth and Hazel—densely-researched, empathetic, measured, revelatory—not only lets us live, as completely as we would in a novel, the confrontation in Little Rock and the creation of an iconic photo, but lets us hear the central figures as they work, for the subsequent half-century, to come to terms with what has happened to them. David Margolick has written a beautiful and moving meditation on race, struggle, and the forgiving and unforgiving passage of time."—Rachel Cohen, author of A Chance Meeting
Christian Science Monitor - Marjorie Kehe
“A marvelous example of bringing history to life through individual stories, . . . [and] a fascinating story of race, relationships, and the struggle to forgive.”—Marjorie Kehe, Christian Science Monitor, “Fall Books: 20 Nonfiction Titles You Don’t Want to Miss”
New York Times Book Review

“A patient and evenhanded account. . . . Margolick proposes no fairytale solutions. . . . To his credit, he spares us none of the unruly facts as his subjects, still wrestling with history, wander off message.”—New York Times Book Review
Florida Courier - Glenn Altschuler

“It is a story, beautifully told, of heroism – and, alas, it also an achingly painful account of the obstacles that stand in the way of racial reconciliation.”—Glenn Altschuler, Florida Courier
Christian Science Monitor - Randy Dotinga

“Powerful and extraordinary. . . . Armed with a perceptive eye and a sensitive heart, Margolick brilliantly tells the story of Elizabeth and Hazel. He chronicles a key moment in American history and its complex aftermath, inserting readers into an intensely personal story of two women caught in history’s web.”—Randy Dotinga, Christian Science Monitor
The Chronicle Review - Louis P. Masur

“Engrossing . . . Elizabeth and Hazel serves to explode the simplifications of The Help and exposes the limits of apology and forgiveness. There is nothing about which to feel upbeat, no easy moral, no simple narrative. The story is a corrective to our collective fantasy that we can rectify the past.”—Louis P. Masur, The Chronicle Review
Cleveland Plain-Dealer - Karen R. Long

“In his engrossing new book Elizabeth and Hazel, David Margolick expands the frame to consider the difficult lives of its two central figures, their attempt at reconciliation, and the fact that they don't speak now. . . . Elizabeth and Hazel raises the specter that some damage doesn’t heal. It is a notion profoundly unsettling to the story we Americans tell about ourselves.”—Karen R. Long, Cleveland Plain-Dealer
Los Angeles Times - Lynell George

"Intricately woven and deeply affecting....[Margolick's] choice to broaden and complicate the narrative - to include the larger minefield of race matters and honest discourse - is what makes this book salient, not sentimental. Elizabeth and Hazel's winding, rocky relationship, then, is a much more fitting and accurate metaphor for the country; this book, an attempt at a different, lasting after-image - this time in words."—Lynell George, Los Angeles Times
Newsday - Gene Seymour

"Judicious and bittersweet....Margolick excels at framing the intimate details of each woman's life with a half-century of social and cultural upheaval....The deeper motives and psyches of the protagonists remain as elusive as any resolution to their story—and, perhaps, just as tangled. Nonfiction, as with photographs, can only do so much—though in Elizabeth and Hazel, it does more than enough."—Gene Seymour, Newsday
Washington Post - Kevin Boyle

For Elizabeth and Hazel, “it would have been simple enough to turn their stories into a ‘where are they now’ piece. But Margolick is after something bigger. Through Eckford and Bryan’s tangled lives, he hopes to capture the complexity of race, forgiveness, and reconciliation in modern America.”—Kevin Boyle, Washington Post
Chicago Tribune - Elizabeth Taylor

"Margolick, rather than sanitizing it, captures the full fraught sweep of history—with wounds so deep that friendship may never be possible."—Elizabeth Taylor, Chicago Tribune
Maclean's - Jane Christmas

“Margolick’s story about what became of Elizabeth and Hazel, and how the incident shaped their personalities and their lives, is compelling....Transformation comes for both Elizabeth and Hazel but not as the reader expects, and this is the startling revelation in Margolick’s narrative. A story of atonement and forgiveness, it is also one of simmering bitterness and pride—on both sides of the racial divide.”—Jane Christmas, Maclean’s
The Defenders Online - Lee A. Daniels

“What gives the story of Elizabeth and Hazel its sustaining power is that both of them, separately and together, have struggled for nearly all their lives after that day to free themselves....It’s a testament to Margolick’s skill as a storyteller, and to the story Elizabeth and Hazel have to tell, that the reader won’t discover until the book’s very end whether they’ve succeeded.”— Lee A. Daniels, TheDefendersOnline
Washington Independent Review of Books - Amy Schapiro

"A riveting portrait of the two women behind the faces of an iconic image and how that image indelibly affected their lives."—Amy Schapiro, Washington Independent Review of Books
Big Think - Kris Broughton

“Where this book really shines, and why I think you should read it, is when Margolick chronicles the reconnection of Elizabeth and Hazel in their later years and their on again, off again relationship. With a minimum of moralizing, Margolick shows the reader why racial reconciliation is more difficult in practice than in theory, especially for those who lived through some of the worst moments in our racial history.”—Kris Broughton, Big Think
The Post and Courier - Olivia Williams

"The chief virtue of "Elizabeth and Hazel" is that it takes a long view. . . . Margolick follows these two women beyond their purported happy ending at the 50th anniversary celebration to a more complicated long-term reality."—Olivia Williams, The Post and Courier
Booklist

“A very nuanced analysis of how Elizabeth and Hazel were affected by the scene that made them famous....A complex look at two women at the center of a historic moment.”—Booklist, starred review

Library Journal
In September 1957, Elizabeth Eckford attempted to enter Little Rock Central High School. One of what became known as the Little Rock Nine, she was prevented from entering the building and headed to a nearby bus stop instead, followed by an angry mob that included Hazel Bryan. Just as Bryan was screaming at Eckford, a journalist snapped a photo that came to define not only integration in Arkansas but, as Margolick (Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song) shows, the lives of Eckford and Bryan. There are volumes of scholarly works on the Civil Rights Movement, but this book is different. By tracing the two women's journeys from that moment until today, often in their own words, Margolick artfully lays bare the emotional and mental wounds and struggles of the participants. Both are presented as human, complete with flaws and weaknesses. Margolick also places the women in the context of the wider civil rights era and beyond. The ending is not what you would expect or even hope for but instead demonstrates how much pain is still felt by all involved and how far we all have still to travel. VERDICT Very thoughtfully and sincerely written, this work is simply a must-read. [Previewed in "Booked Solid," LJ 7/11.—Ed.]—Lisa A. Ennis, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham Lib.
Amy Finnerty
In Elizabeth and Hazel, [Margolick] provides a patient and evenhanded account of their messy relationship over the decades…To his credit, he spares us none of the unruly facts as his subjects, still wrestling with history, wander off message.
—The New York Times Book Review
TheAtlantic.com
Margolick’s unforgettable new book, Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock, takes as its touchstone a famous civil rights-era photograph. . . . eloquently chronicl[ing] their lives since that iconic photo was taken.—Kate Tuttle, TheAtlantic.com

— Kate Tuttle

The New York Times Book Review
A patient and evenhanded account of their messy relationship over the decades. . . . Margolick proposes no fairy-tale resolutions to such moral impasses. To his credit, he spares us none of the unruly facts as his subjects, still wrestling with history, wander off message.—Amy Finnerty, The New York Times Book Review

— Amy Finnerty

Cleveland Plain-Dealer
In his engrossing new book Elizabeth and Hazel, David Margolick expands the frame to consider the difficult lives of its two central figures, their attempt at reconciliation, and the fact that they don't speak now. . . . Elizabeth and Hazel raises the specter that some damage doesn’t heal. It is a notion profoundly unsettling to the story we Americans tell about ourselves.—Karen R. Long, Cleveland Plain-Dealer

— Karen R. Long

Los Angeles Times
Intricately woven and deeply affecting....[Margolick's] choice to broaden and complicate the narrative - to include the larger minefield of race matters and honest discourse - is what makes this book salient, not sentimental. Elizabeth and Hazel's winding, rocky relationship, then, is a much more fitting and accurate metaphor for the country; this book, an attempt at a different, lasting after-image - this time in words.—Lynell George, Los Angeles Times

— Lynell George

Newsday
Judicious and bittersweet....Margolick excels at framing the intimate details of each woman's life with a half-century of social and cultural upheaval....The deeper motives and psyches of the protagonists remain as elusive as any resolution to their story—and, perhaps, just as tangled. Nonfiction, as with photographs, can only do so much—though in Elizabeth and Hazel, it does more than enough.—Gene Seymour, Newsday

— Gene Seymour

Washington Post

For Elizabeth and Hazel, “it would have been simple enough to turn their stories into a ‘where are they now’ piece. But Margolick is after something bigger. Through Eckford and Bryan’s tangled lives, he hopes to capture the complexity of race, forgiveness, and reconciliation in modern America.—Kevin Boyle, Washington Post

— Kevin Boyle

From the Publisher
"Margolick's book becomes utterly engrossing, for it touches on a variety of thorny, provocative themes: the power of race, the nature of friendship, the role of personality, the capacity for brutality and for forgiveness." —-Publishers Weekly
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780300141931
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication date: 10/4/2011
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 701,270
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

David Margolick is contributing editor, Vanity Fair, and a frequent contributor to the New York Times Book Review. He was for fifteen years a legal affairs reporter at the New York Times, writing the weekly "At the Bar" column and covering the trial of O. J. Simpson, among others. His most recent book is Beyond Glory: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink. He lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Readable and Thoughtful

    Eliz­a­beth and Hazel: Two Women of Lit­tle Rock by David Mar­golick is a non fic­tion book about two ladies who were made famous by the press. The book looks his­tory square in the eye and doesn't flinch.

    Eliz­a­beth Eck­ford and Hazel Bryan were cap­tured for pros­per­ity in a pho­to­graph by Will Counts. The pic­ture which is a disgrace to the Jim Crow south struck chords in many peo­ple in Amer­i­can on many lev­els and still does so today.

    How­ever, the two women in the pic­ture, Eliz­a­beth Eck­ford walk­ing in a dig­ni­fied man­ner away from an assault­ing Hazel Bryan, soon grew out of the pic­ture, matur­ing and resent­ing the role which they were not pre­pared to play.

    Eliz­a­beth and Hazel: Two Women of Lit­tle Rock by David Mar­golick is an amaz­ing book which is read­able and thought­ful. Mr. Mar­golick man­aged to tackle tough issues with hon­esty and sen­si­tiv­ity which are rare in today's world.

    The pic­ture cap­tured a moment in time which shook the world. It had every­thing, a mar­tyr, a vil­lain and his­tory. How­ever, we still remem­ber those two women, the dig­ni­fied Eliz­a­beth and the shout­ing Hazel as they were in Sep­tem­ber of 1957. Mr. Mar­golick finds out what hap­pened after the pic­ture was taken in a fair, even, hon­est and patient account.

    The moment shaped Elizabeth's future. She suf­fered tremen­dously from her instant fame, her abuse for years at Cen­tral High School and the after­math of her brave brush with his­tory. Hazel, on the other hand, was play­ing hooky from school and for­got that moment in almost an instant.

    Years later, Hazel who real­ized what she has done called to apol­o­gize but it wasn't until 1997 when the two women were reunited and formed a frag­ile bond. I can­not judge nei­ther of the two. I can­not even imag­ine going through the hard­ships Eliz­a­beth has endured or the men­tal anguish Hazel has had after being made, for years, the face of segregation.

    The book has sur­prised me more times than I could count. For instance, the seg­re­ga­tion­ist lead­ers abhorred the pic­ture because it made them look bad, or the way Eliz­a­beth and Hazel han­dled their indi­vid­ual and col­lec­tive expe­ri­ences over the years or even the way Oprah behaved.

    This book has a lot to teach our soci­ety. It doesn't see his­tory in rose col­ored glasses, nor the present, nor the future. It presents things as they are, giv­ing the reader food for thought.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 18, 2011

    I Highly Recommened this true story.

    I loved this book. I'm 81 year old white woman and grew up in the midwest, that was before the Civil Rights act was passed. I'm grateful for all the courage and bravery some citizens went through at those troubled times. It made our country stronger, however there is still too much raceism around. Loved this true story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2014

    Josh

    Josh pulls back and kisses her on the cheek. "Morning Love." He wanders around the kitchen and pulls out ingredients. [Me and Fall won't be on for a few days. Two or three. Maybe a week. My moms taking my Nook. And Fall's too.]

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2014

    Sammy

    She presses closer to him, her tongue playing with his. She cups his face with her hands

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 24, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I applaud David Margolick for doing the research to tell the res

    I applaud David Margolick for doing the research to tell the rest of the story of September 4, 1957 but also for showing the divergent lives of two women since that day.  I wasn't born until years after the height of the Civil Rights movement so reading this caused me to think introspectively about how I would have reacted if I had been in the midst of that.  This is a powerful story about what the far-reaching and unforeseen consequences of seemingly insignificant actions might be and what can be learned from that.  My heart breaks for both of these women for the part they had to play in this drama.  But this book also provides a reminder of why respect for others should be paramount in our daily lives.  I'm glad I read this book and more fully understand the story behind the photo.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Hazelstream

    She pounces on a rabbit and she scrapes it up in her jaws and runs away to the camp

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2013

    Darkfrost

    He too pounced on, and succesfully killed his prey...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2013

    Ninjastorm

    Pads in

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2013

    Shrinekit

    She came over and sat

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Hazelstar

    Nodded. "Very. Go to res thirteen. I'll assess your fighting skills."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)