The Friends of Eddie Coyle: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview



The classic novel from "America's best crime novelist" (Time), with a new introduction by Elmore Leonard

Eddie Coyle works for Jimmy Scalisi, supplying him with guns for a couple of bank jobs. But a cop named Foley is on to Eddie and he's leaning on him to finger Scalisi, a gang leader with a lot to hide. And then there's Dillon-a ...
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The Friends of Eddie Coyle: A Novel

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Overview



The classic novel from "America's best crime novelist" (Time), with a new introduction by Elmore Leonard

Eddie Coyle works for Jimmy Scalisi, supplying him with guns for a couple of bank jobs. But a cop named Foley is on to Eddie and he's leaning on him to finger Scalisi, a gang leader with a lot to hide. And then there's Dillon-a full-time bartender and part-time contract killer--pretending to be Eddie's friend. Wheeling, dealing, chasing, and stealing--that's Eddie, and he's got lots of friends.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
George V. Higgins, who died in 1999 at the absurdly early age of 59, was an American original, a man who made a unique -- and inimitable -- contribution to the development of the modern crime novel. In the course of his career, which spanned 27 years and resulted in more than 30 books, Higgins wrote with passion, wit, and a fierce integrity about a wide variety of subjects: sports, business, politics, the law, the art and craft of writing. But what he did best -- did better, in fact, than any other novelist before or since -- was to dramatize the squalid, anything-for-a-dollar lives of the liars, losers, and two-bit gangsters who inhabited the interstices of his native Boston. His most famous exploration of that peculiar milieu was The Friends of Eddie Coyle, which was first published in 1972 and remains, to this day, an absolute model of its kind.

The eponymous Eddie Coyle is a typical Higgins Everyman, a fringe player for the Boston mob whose life is spiraling out of control. As the novel opens, Eddie is 45 years old, unhappily married, and more than a little desperate. In addition to the usual stress of a life lived on the edge, Eddie is about to face sentencing for his role in an aborted hijacking that took place in New Hampshire the year before. Offered a reduced sentence in return for naming his compatriots, Eddie refused, and he is about to relearn one of the fundamental lessons of the street: Stand-up guys always end up in jail.

While awaiting sentencing, Eddie continues to scuffle for a buck. His latest hustle involves purchasing handguns from an ex-Hell's Angel, then reselling those guns to a local Boston hoodlum, who puts them to use in a cleverly planned, ultimately tragic series of robberies that Higgins describes in crisp, authoritative prose. Early in the novel, while taking delivery of several new weapons, Eddie glimpses a small cache of rifles -- M-16s stolen from a local military base -- in the trunk of the gun dealer's car. Seizing this opportunity, Eddie forsakes the unwritten code of the streets and becomes an informer. He notifies a Boston-based federal agent about the stolen weapons, trading one man's freedom for what he hopes will be a lighter sentence. Nothing, of course, works exactly as planned, and Eddie soon finds himself a marked man, trapped in a web of coincidental occurrences and conflicting agendas. In the end, he pays for his defection in a violent, ironic denouement in which a primitive form of frontier justice prevails.

Higgins populates Eddie's tawdry little corner of Boston with an authentic, vividly created assortment of lowlifes, including: Jackie Brown, the street-smart gun dealer forced to learn what it really means to be a stand-up guy; Dave Foley, the cynical Treasury agent whose "promises" to his informants prove glib and insubstantial; Jimmy Scalisi, a professional thief whose casual mistreatment of his girlfriend has unexpected consequences; and Dillon, the ubiquitous bartender whose actual role in the shadowy world of the Boston mob is only gradually disclosed.

Higgins understood these people, most of whom -- criminal tendencies aside -- are disconcertingly similar to many of "us." They drink too much, worry about their mortgages, bet more than they can afford on horses and professional sports, endure combative, often violent, relationships with their wives and mistresses, and gaze helplessly at the world around them, wondering why everything has gone so badly wrong. And, of course, they talk, colorfully and endlessly, about the sometimes horrifying, sometimes hilarious circumstances of their lives.

It has, by now, become something of a cliché to describe George Higgins as a "master of dialogue," but that, in fact, is what he was. Higgins's ear for the rhythms of human speech -- for the shrewd, funny, obscene, discursive monologues that form the heart of so much of his work -- was uncanny and unprecedented, and has exerted an influence on the novels and stories of a great many writers who followed in his footsteps, such as Elmore Leonard, James Ellroy, David Mamet, and John Gregory Dunne, to name only a few. In Higgins's novels, dialogue was always the single most important element of narrative, and it served a variety of functions: illuminating character, creating a sense of personal and historical context, advancing the often convoluted plots. No writer in recent years has so effectively utilized the idiosyncrasies of the human voice. No one, really, has come close.

A few years ago, in one of those eternally popular attempts at creative list making, mystery connoisseur Otto Penzler asked a number of prominent suspense writers to name their ten favorite crime novels. Elmore Leonard, who learned as much from Higgins's distinctive technique as anyone, gave what was perhaps the most provocative response, placing The Friends of Eddie Coyle in all ten slots. It's easy, on reflection, to sympathize with Leonard's choice. George V. Higgins was, after all, that kind of writer, and The Friends of Eddie Coyle remains that kind of book. (Bill Sheehan)

Gale Research
Higgins received immediate critical approval for his writing with the publication of The Friends of Eddie Coyle, "one of the best of its genre I have read since Hemingway's `The Killers,'" claims Christopher Lehmann-Haupt of the New York Times. It "is fiction of a most convincing order," according to Harvey Gardner in the New York Times Book Review. "The story of Eddie and his hood friends, and of the cops and lawyers who belong in their world as much as the crooks do, is told in short, beautifully-made episodes, full of nicely heard talk."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429931984
  • Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/27/2010
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 105,712
  • File size: 205 KB

Meet the Author



George V. Higgins was a lawyer, journalist, teacher, and the author of 29 books, including Bomber's Law, Trust , and Kennedy for the Defense.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 9, 2011

    BOOOO B&N

    First off, my stars given is not to the book but to Barnes & Noble. The book in itself is a great crime story from back in the day. The boo is for the fact that B&N charged $9.99 for a 148 page story. It was almost like reading a novella yet paying for a regular priced paperback edition of a 500 page book. I purchased a Nook because it was supposed to be cheaper, no book to print, paper to use, distribution costs, etc. and yet the prices have risen in the 2 years of having my Nook. I am highly disappointed and unfortunately only have the review of a book to let people know this. If you plan on reading this book, do yourself a favor and find a cheap used copy and avoid paying $10 for such a short story.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2003

    The Best

    'The Friends of Eddie Coyle' rises above genre mystery fiction. It is scary good. The Novel's voice is accurate, realistic and inimitable. It's American Literature. And the movie (Robert Mitchum) wasn't bad. Highly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2011

    Friends of Eddie Coyle

    Great dialogue and 1970's Boston setting. Plot is a little thin and scattered though

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