Haystack Syndrome: Sifting Information out of the Data Ocean

( 2 )

Overview

A must for every manager concerned with meeting the challenges of the 21st century. You'll see the differences between data and information in a new light, and understand precisely how misunderstanding those differences can affect the quality of your decision-making process. Starting with the structure of an organization, The Haystack Syndrome ends with a detailed description of the logic that must underpin the information system for any ...
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Overview

A must for every manager concerned with meeting the challenges of the 21st century. You'll see the differences between data and information in a new light, and understand precisely how misunderstanding those differences can affect the quality of your decision-making process. Starting with the structure of an organization, The Haystack Syndrome ends with a detailed description of the logic that must underpin the information system for any organization to maximize effectiveness.

Part One:
Formalizing the Decision Process - Defining the goal, the measurements, and how to continuously improve the whole system - the Theory of Constraints.

Part Two:
The Architecture of an Information System - Dealing with information as it relates to the real world; quantifying Murphy, the time-buffer concept, directing process improvements, measuring local performance.

Part Three:
Scheduling - how to implement a real process of ongoing improvement requiring interplay between the system and the manager, resolving all conflicts, considering capacity and protection.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780884271840
  • Publisher: North River Press Publishing Corporation, The
  • Publication date: 6/28/2006
  • Pages: 262
  • Sales rank: 1,240,161
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Part One: Formalizing the Decision Process
Chapter 1: Data,information and the decision process -- how they relate ..... 3
Chapter 2: What a company tries to achieve ..... 8
Chapter 3: Getting a hold on measurements ..... 14
Chapter 4: Defining Throughput ..... 19
Chapter 5: Removing the overlap between Inventory and Operating Expense ..... 23
Chapter 6: Measurements, Bottom Line, and Cost Accounting ..... 31
Chapter 7: Exposing the foundation of cost accounting ..... 36
Chapter 8: Cost accounting was the traditional measurement ..... 41
Chapter 9: The new measurements' scale of importance ..... 47
Chapter 10: The resulting paradigm shift ..... 52
Chapter 11: Formulating the Throughput World's decision process ..... 58
Chapter 12: What is the missing link? -- building a decisive experiment ..... 64
Chapter 13: Demonstrating the difference between the Cost World and the Throughput World ..... 72
Chapter 14: Clarifying the confusion between data and information -- some fundamental definitions ..... 79
Chapter 15: Demonstrating the impact of the new decision process on some tactical issues ..... 86
Chapter 16: Demonstrating inertia as a cause for policy constraints ..... 93
Part Two: The Architecture of an Information System
Chapter 17: Peering into the inherent structure of an information system -- first attempt ..... 103
Chapter 18: Introducing the need to quantify "protection" ..... 109
Chapter 19: Required data can be achieved only through scheduling and quantification of Murphy ..... 116
Chapter 20: Introducing the time buffer concept ..... 121
Chapter 21: Buffers and buffer-origins ..... 127
Chapter 22: First step in quantifying Murphy ..... 132
Chapter 23: Directing the efforts to improve local processes ..... 138
Chapter 24: Local performance measurements ..... 144
Chapter 25: An Information System must be composed of Scheduling, Control and What-If modules ..... 156
Part Three: Scheduling
Chapter 26: Speeding up the process ..... 163
Chapter 27: Cleaning up some more inertia -- rearranging the data structure ..... 169
Chapter 28: Establishing the criteria for an acceptable schedule ..... 179
Chapter 29: Identifying the first constraints ..... 186
Chapter 30: How to work with very inaccurate data ..... 194
Chapter 31: Pinpointing the conflicts between the identified constraints ..... 200
Chapter 32: Starting to remove conflicts -- the system/user interplay ..... 208
Chapter 33: Resolving all remaining conflicts ..... 214
Chapter 34: Manual subordination: the drum-buffer-rope method ..... 222
Chapter 35: Subordinating while considering non-constraints' capacity -- the conceptual approach ..... 229
Chapter 36: Dynamic time buffers and protective capacity ..... 235
Chapter 37: Some residual issues ..... 241
Chapter 38: The details of the subordination procedure ..... 247
Chapter 39: Identifying the next constraint, and looping back ..... 252
Chapter 40: Partial summary of benefits ..... 260
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