Herman

Herman

by Lars Saabye Christensen, Stephen Michael Nordby
     
 

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Eleven-year-old Herman is not that different from other boys—except that he is going bald. Presented with this dilemma, Herman uses his fertile imagination and comical viewpoint on life to navigate through the rough seas commonly known as "growing up." In the process, he teaches everyone something about friendship, courage, acceptance, and love.

Overview

Eleven-year-old Herman is not that different from other boys—except that he is going bald. Presented with this dilemma, Herman uses his fertile imagination and comical viewpoint on life to navigate through the rough seas commonly known as "growing up." In the process, he teaches everyone something about friendship, courage, acceptance, and love.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Poor Herman--has he got troubles. The bullies in his class make his life hell after school; the red-haired girl he likes humiliates him; his gym teacher calls him a sissy for failing at rope climbing; and all his hair is falling out from a mysterious illness that neither the doctor nor his parents will fully explain to him. Herman is furious at his parents for not understanding him and broods about his hair loss. But when his sick grandfather dies, the boy realizes there are bigger losses than his in the world and begins growing up. This is a tragicomic coming-of-age story--one that straddles the adult/young adult market--told from the perspective of an imaginative, funny kid. On seeing a pigeon in the rain, Herman thinks, ``Birds are lucky not to need raincoats and hats. . . . But if it rains for forty days, like in Africa, then maybe they have to use life vests and snorkels?'' Though Herman's mother gets superficial treatment, and some of Herman's jokes wear thin with repetition, the author enjoys extending the boy's imagination. Christensen ( The Joker ) uses fresh imagery and lyrical prose, while the translator gives readers a solid feel for Norway's language and culture. Film rights to RKO Pictures. (Dec.)
Library Journal
Herman goes to elementary school and lives with his nice, loving, working-class parents in Oslo, Norway. His life abruptly changes when he contracts the disease Alopecia areata, which causes him to go bald. The story, which evolves around spunky little Herman's attempts to cope with his trauma, holds the reader's interest more because of its unusual theme than for its psychological or artistic merits. The cultural milieu of Oslo in the 1960s seems too distant; many of the characters are more like caricatures than real people; and Herman himself doesn't quite come alive. Christensen's previous novel, The Joker ( LJ 4/15/91), was more successful, but although this book seems to be written mainly to support victims of Herman's disease, there may still be demand because of the recent release in this country of a film version. --Ulla Sweedler, Univ. of California at San Diego Lib.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781905147007
Publisher:
Arcadia Books
Publication date:
04/01/2007
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.75(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.48(d)

Meet the Author

Lars Saabye Christensen is the author of numerous short stories and poems as well as 12 novels, including the international bestseller The Half Brother, one of the 25 Notable Titles of 2004 by the American Library Association.

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