Hound Dog True

( 17 )

Overview

A story about small acts of courage from the author of A Crooked Kind of Perfect.

Do not let a mop sit overnight in water. Fix things before they get too big for fixing. Custodial wisdom: Mattie Breen writes it all down. She has just one week to convince Uncle Potluck to take her on as his custodial apprentice at Mitchell P. Anderson Elementary School. One week until school starts and she has to be the new girl again. But if she can be Uncle Potluck’s apprentice, she’ll have ...

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Overview

A story about small acts of courage from the author of A Crooked Kind of Perfect.

Do not let a mop sit overnight in water. Fix things before they get too big for fixing. Custodial wisdom: Mattie Breen writes it all down. She has just one week to convince Uncle Potluck to take her on as his custodial apprentice at Mitchell P. Anderson Elementary School. One week until school starts and she has to be the new girl again. But if she can be Uncle Potluck’s apprentice, she’ll have important work to do during lunch and recess. Work that will keep her safely away from the other fifth graders. But when her custodial wisdom goes all wrong, Mattie’s plan comes crashing down. And only then does she begin to see how one small, brave act can lead to a friend who is hound dog true.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Urban (A Crooked Kind of Perfect) traces a highly self-conscious child's cautious emergence from her shell in this tender novel about new beginnings and "small brave" acts. Fifth grader Mattie Breen doesn't share her mother's eagerness to pick up stakes whenever "the going gets tough." Mattie hates starting over at unfamiliar schools, but when her mother announces they will be living with Uncle Potluck, Mattie feels hopeful, for once. Uncle Potluck tells funny, larger-than-life stories—the kind of stories Mattie likes to write, but is embarrassed to share with others. Mattie hopes that Uncle Potluck will make her his "custodial apprentice" at the school where he works (and which she'll attend) and that this time she'll finally find a "true, tell-your-secrets-to" friend. Urban's understated, borderline naïf narrative gives voice to Mattie's many uncertainties ("Always Mattie has been shy. Always school had made her feel skittish and small") while expressing the quiet yet significant moments in her day-to-day life. Mattie's growing trust of others and her attempts to be "bold and friendly" lead to gratifying rewards for Mattie and poignant moments for readers. Ages 9–12. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
* "This outstanding, emotionally resonant effort will appeal to middle-grade readers."—Kirkus, starred review

* "Urban (A Crooked Kind of Perfect) traces a highly self-conscious child's cautious emergence from her shell in this tender novel about new beginnings and "small brave" acts... Urban's understated, borderline naïf narrative gives voice to Mattie's many uncertainties ("Always Mattie has been shy. Always school had made her feel skittish and small") while expressing the quiet yet significant moments in her day-to-day life. Mattie's growing trust of others and her attempts to be "bold and friendly" lead to gratifying rewards for Mattie and poignant moments for readers."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Internal drama, compelling characters, and Mattie’s strong voice propel the story of learning to do "a small brave thing."—Booklist

* "There are many books that offer adventure and twists and unusual story lines. Most of them do not offer young readers such fine writing and real characters. That is hook enough."—School Library Journal, starred review

Children's Literature - Carly Reagan
Mattie is a shy and imaginative soon-to-be fifth grader. After moving for the millionth time, she and her mother are staying with her Uncle Potluck, who is the custodian of what will be her new school. Nervous about beginning again with new peers and the anxiety-inducing social situation that is recess, Mattie devises a plan to learn everything she can from her uncle in order to become a Custodial Apprentice, so she will be able to spend her free time in his office instead of trying to make friends she will undoubtedly be expected to leave again. Her plans to avoid all social interaction are thwarted when the neighbor's niece, Quincy Sweet, comes to stay for the summer. The ups and downs that come from being in a new place are perfectly captured in Mattie's thoughts as she over analyzes every word and glance from others. An emotionally-charged story of relationships, confidence and getting over painful past experiences, the author captures each emotion clearly and makes it easy to relate to Mattie as the reader is brought directly into her thought process. Any child who struggles with the everyday pressure of self and peer acceptance will know what Mattie is going through. A read that is a quick, but far from simple, which will strike a chord in many young minds. Reviewer: Carly Reagan
School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—Mattie Breen is a self-conscious and sensitive child about to begin fifth grade in her fifth school. This time, she and her mother are back in her mother's girlhood home with Uncle Potluck, the "Director of Custodial Arts" at the school Mattie is slated to attend. She dreads the prospect of recesses and lunch times—any times where she might find herself in unpredictable social situations—so she devises a plan to become her uncle's invaluable assistant. As he prepares the school during the last week of summer, Mattie accompanies him and records "Custodial Wisdom" in a silver notebook. She hopes to impress him so that he will want her help during the school day. Uncle Potluck is an intelligent, positive character, and he adds an extra heap of credibility to his many stories by referring to them as "hound dog true." He is a kind and sensitive example for his reclusive niece—a storyteller, like her. Quinn, who is visiting next door, and is as much an artist as Mattie is a writer, also makes a start in bringing the timid girl out of her shell. The most action readers will find in this story is Uncle Potluck tripping over a vacuum cleaner cord, but the characters are well limned, and Mattie's perceptions and observations add a tender dimension. There are many books that offer adventure and twists and unusual story lines. Most of them do not offer young readers such fine writing and real characters. That is hook enough.—Corrina Austin, Locke's Public School, St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada
Kirkus Reviews

With a little help from a caring adult, a child crippled by shyness begins to bloom.

Soon-to-be fifth grader Mattie is painfully shy, making the frequent moves her mother has initiated especially difficult. In the last days of summer, after she and her mother move in with her Uncle Potluck, the elementary-school custodian, he quickly recognizes both her talent and her difficulties and begins bringing her to work with him, where she records everything he does in her journal (since she's a writer). She hopes that if she learns enough custodial skills, she can become his junior apprentice during lunch and recess and so avoid the most challenging times of the school day. Meanwhile, she is studiously steering clear of Quincy, a slightly older girl visiting next door; in trying to avoid the social minefield of friendship, she fails to recognize that Quincy is a kindred spirit. As amiable Potluck gently guides her, and her jittery but loving mother comes to better understand her, Mattie believably begins to turn from her inwardly focused timidity to an eye-opening awareness of the complexity of others' emotional landscapes. Combining Mattie's poignant writing and interior monologue, exquisite character development and a slow, deliberate pace, Urban spins a story that rings true.

This outstanding, emotionally resonant effort will appeal to middle-grade readers. (Fiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547558691
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 9/20/2011
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 810,988
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 710L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.28 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda Urban 's debut novel, A Crooked Kind of Perfect, was a BookSense pick, a New York Public Library Best Book for Reading and Sharing, and was nominated for twenty state awards. A former independent bookseller at Vroman's in Pasadena, California, she now writes full time in Montpelier, Vermont, where she lives with her family. Visit her website at www.lindaurbanbooks.com

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Read an Excerpt

Uncle Potluck said when he talked to the moon, the moon talked back.

Mama laughed. “Same old Potluck,” she said, but he’d already grabbed his hat. Already looked at Mattie, eyebrows up, saying, “It’s hound dog true.” Already opened the door to the night.

Out they went, out past the bean tepees and tomato cages and the stone rabbit standing guard, Mattie matching Uncle Potluck’s steps in the garden dirt. Out they went beyond the tangle of pumpkin vines and the backyard house Miss Sweet was renting.

“Few more days, you’ll know this place by heart,” Uncle Potluck said. “Won’t need me showing you the way.” 

Mattie was not so sure. It was dark out here, without streetlights and golden arches and headlights graying up the sky. Uncle Potluck had grown up in this yard. Mama, too. Likely it would take till Mattie grew up before she could path her way through the night.

Up they went, up the rise to the edge of the woods, to the flat rock ledge by the apple tree. Uncle Potluck looked up and Mattie looked up, up to where the moon ought to be. Uncle Potluck whispered, “She’s hiding behind the skirts of Mama Night, you know?”

Mattie knew.

Uncle Potluck leaped up on that rock. Put his hat to his heart. “Miss Moon,” he called. “Miss Moon, come on out, sweetheart.”

Uncle Potluck waited and Mattie waited till a breeze came by, thinning the clouds.

“You’ve got to trust the moon, if you want the moon to trust you,” he said, handing Mattie his hat.

He wanted her to talk, Mattie knew. Wanted her to introduce herself, say something fine, but Mattie could not find a word in that dark.

She put on Uncle Potluck’s hat, let it fall down over her eyes.

Chapter One
The stick man has bolts of cartoon electricity shooting out of him. Attention! Avertissement! it says over his head. Atención! Achtung! Do not use ladder in electrical storms. May cause severe injury or death.

Mattie is glad she is not in an electrical storm. She does not want little bolts of lightning to shoot out of her. Of course, she’s just standing at the bottom of the ladder, holding it two-hand steady, eyes level with the warning labels pasted to its metal sides.

It’s Uncle Potluck up top, like the stick man, so probably Uncle Potluck would get the death. Mattie’d only get severe injury, she figures, and for a minute she thinks about what kind of injury that might be. Lightning could split a tree, she knew. Maybe it would split her. Take a leg off or something. Or maybe she’d singe all over, like a shirt ironed too hot. Either way, it is good they are inside, she tells herself.

It is good that they are here, inside Mitchell P. Anderson Elementary School, inside Ms. Morgan’s fifth grade classroom, inside the room that Uncle Potluck says will be hers once school starts.

It is good, she tells herself again.

And she keeps it good by focusing on the stick man, not wandering her eyes to the rows of desks or the coat closet doors or the blackboard up front. She reminds herself there is a whole week before this new school starts and she doesn’t have to think about any of that yet.

She can just help Uncle Potluck fulfill his Janitorial Oath.

She can steady the ladder.

She can think about severe injury and death.

“Mattie Mae,” says Uncle Potluck. “I am entrusting you with this distinguished veteran.” Mattie loosens one hand from the ladder and reaches for the light bulb Uncle Potluck hands down. It is not a regular bulb—not the round kind that might ping on above a stick man if he got an idea. It is the long, skinny, lightsaber kind. The kind that sat in the ceilings of every school Mattie ever went to. Which is three. Four, counting this one. Four schools.

The bulb is ash gray. Uncle Potluck puts his hat to his heart and bows his head. “Gave its life in service of the illumination of youth,” he says.

Mattie smiles. Bows her head like Uncle Potluck. “Thank you, bulb,” she says. It’s only Uncle Potluck around, so she doesn’t mind saying it out loud.

“Put that in the box, Mattie. We’ll take it back to Authorized Personnel and give it a proper burial.” Mattie nods and lets go of the ladder. It doesn’t wobble. Uncle Potluck doesn’t need steadying, really. He’s been performing the Custodial Arts since before Mattie was even born.

Up at the front of the room, a skinny box rests against Ms. Morgan’s desk. Mattie sets the veteran down and slow-careful pulls a fresh bulb from that box, a bulb so white it matches the chalk on the blackboard ledge.

This is probably where she’ll have to stand.

It’s always up front that teachers make you stand.

Every time Mattie has been new at a school, the teacher made her stand in front of the blackboard and say her name. Except last time, fourth grade. That was Mrs. D’Angelo’s class. Mrs. D’Angelo had a whiteboard instead. Told Mattie to stand in front of that while she wrote Mattie’s name fat and loopy in blue marker on that whiteboard.

Introduce yourself.

“I’m Mattie Breen,” Mattie had said.

Louder.

“I’m Mattie Breen.” Came out quieter, though.

Tell us something about yourself.

And just like every other transfer day, Mattie got tangled in her own head, trying to figure out what would be good to say. What she could say that would be smart or funny or interesting enough to make people forget they already had friends and places to sit at lunch and people to be with at recess.

Mattie’d had her notebook with her—the first one, the yellow one—and she’d held it to her chest like armor. Tucked her chin behind it. Felt her breath bouncing hot back.

Shoes shuffled under chairs.

Shy, someone whispered.

Stuck up got whispered back.

Just the day before, Mattie had seen a TV show about Buddhist monks, how they could breathe so deep and slow they seemed to stop time, to stop their own hearts from beating. Mattie tried that then. Breathed slow and deep, trying to stop her face from redding up.

It did not work.

Probably because I’m not a Buddhist, she thought. And that’s what she said.

“I’m not a Buddhist.”

That was enough for Mrs. D’Angelo to tell her she could sit down.

Mattie did sit down.

Sat holding her yellow notebook at a table Mrs. D’Angelo had pushed an extra chair up to.

Sat in the place Mrs. D’Angelo said was for now.

Sat with four other kids—one of them that girl Star, though Mattie didn’t know that yet. All Mattie knew was that she had said, Not a Buddhist.

Not exactly the kind of introduction that would have people rushing to make friends.

Not that she knew how to make friends, really.

She could be friendly, of course. After the newness of a place wore off, she’d been friendly. By then it was usually too late for true, tell-your-secrets-to friends, even the nicest people calling her that shy girl instead of Mattie.

Not a Buddhist.

Not a Buddhist. Not a Buddhist. Not a Buddhist.

Took a whole half of that morning before she could concentrate on anything else.

When finally she did settle, Mattie caught a glimpse of the whiteboard. There was her name sitting bold and friendly among the times tables and the spelling words.  Like she was a lesson. Like Mattie Breen being bold-friendly was just as true as five times five being twenty-five or weird being spelled the way it was.

I’m Mattie Breen, she thought.

She sat straighter.

I’m bold and friendly, she thought. Fact-true, like it says on the board.

That’s when Mrs. D’Angelo started in on science. Started writing Survivalon the board. Writing of the. Finding no room left on that big whiteboard for fittest.

“Forgive me, Mattie,” she said, smiling.

And then Mattie Breen got erased.

Chapter Two
Uncle Potluck slides the new bulb into its socket and slips the gray cover into its place among the ceiling tiles. Mattie has to move so he can step down the ladder, but she’s close enough to hear the hooting sound he makes on the third step.

It’s his traitorous knee that makes him hoot, the tiny sting of it when he’s taking stairs or kneeling or getting up from having sat still for a movie. He’s got surgery planned for a few months from now, come Christmas vacation. That’s why this move was back to Uncle Potluck’s, to the house where he and Mama and their brothers grew up.

“I’ve planned it all out,” Mama told Mattie. “Potluck will need some help around Christmas. By then I’ll have some vacation time, and you’ll be all settled in and comfortable at school.” Mama’s first two fingers fluttered on her thumb, like the piccolo player Mattie had seen once. Except when the piccolo man did it, he was making music. When Mama’s fingers moved that way it meant she was making plans, her fingers moving as fast as the thoughts in her head. “It was time for a new job, anyway. My old boss was getting grouchy and there was talk of layoffs. And when the going gets tough . . .”

Mama had waited then, like she always did. Waited for Mattie to say, “. . . the tough get going,” which Mattie always said and Mama always took to mean that Mattie was fine with moving again, whether she was or not. This time, though, Mattie had been happy, since moving meant being with Uncle Potluck.

“Mattie?” Uncle Potluck clatters the ladder flat. Puts it to his shoulder. “Will you carry the decedent?”—by which he means for her to get the box with the old light bulb in it.

Down the main hallway of Mitchell P. Anderson Elementary they go. Uncle Potluck first, Mattie following. You can’t tell he’s got a traitorous knee when he’s walking. He just walks, steady and strong, past the drinking fountain and the restrooms and the gymnasium/stage/cafeteria. At the administrative office, he stops long enough to salute the gold-framed picture of Principal Bonnet that hangs outside the door, and then they are off again, rounding the corner and heading to the end of the hall, past the art room, past the music room, to a pair of orange doors marked AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL. That’s where Uncle Potluck keeps his office.

It is a neat office, with a desk tucked snug under the hot-water pipe and walls covered in pegboard. Uncle Potluck hangs his tools on those walls. He’s drawn white lines around them, too—like the ones they draw around dead bodies on TV shows, except dead-body lines are about mysteries and Uncle Potluck’s lines are about things being for sure where they belong. Broom in the broom spot. Wrench in the wrench spot. There’s even an outline for Uncle Potluck’s hat—though mostly that spot stays empty.

Things that don’t belong on the walls have shelf spots or drawer spots, all of them labeled neat.

SCREWS

GLUE

TAPE

EXTENSION CORDS

STRING

Uncle Potluck’s chair has a label, too. DIRECTOR OF CUSTODIAL ARTS it says on the back. Neat and square.

Mama is neat, too, Mattie thinks. But Mama’s neat is about getting rid of things. Every time she and Mattie moved, things got left behind. Toasters and TV trays and Mattie’s old dollhouse, all left by the driveway, a FREE sign propped against them. Mama never owns more than can fit in a pickup truck.

When Mattie was real little, she would buckle herself into the truck before any boxes got packed, afraid maybe there wouldn’t be room for her. Used to think that was what had happened to her father, that he hadn’t fit in the truck and Mama had driven off. Really, he was just too young to get married, so he drove off himself.

Mattie pushes the DIRECTOR OF CUSTODIAL ARTS chair up to the desk, so Uncle Potluck can maneuver the ladder. Watches him hang it firm in the ladder spot. Sees a spot marked RECYCLING and sets the bulb box there, which is exactly where it goes.

“Mattie Mae,” Uncle Potluck says. “I have a mind to declare you too talented for this here school and take you on as an apprentice.” And it feels like Uncle Potluck has drawn a fat white belonging-line around her.

MATTIE MAE BREEN
CUSTODIAL APPRENTICE

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 25, 2012

    I truly wish that I had been able to read Hound Dog True as a ch

    I truly wish that I had been able to read Hound Dog True as a child. Linda Urban's writing is sweet and refreshing, heartfelt and insightful - a book for all ages to read, experience and be inspired by.

    Mattie has one week to adjust before becoming the new kid in school again. She decides that maybe this time it won't be so bad if she can convince her Uncle Potluck, the custodian to her school, to let her become his apprentice in order to avoid any moments to where she would have to be forced to talk to her classmates. She is very observant and records all of their odd jobs in her notebook.
    Will her idea work?

    Then the neighbors niece comes into town for the week. Mattie's mother and Uncle would like them to be friends. But Mattie is awkward and doesn't know what to do with Quincy who looks to be older and outspoken, the complete opposite of what Mattie is.
    Will Mattie be able to trust Quincy to be her friend?

    Mattie's mother, although very loving and caring, is flighty and in denial. Her motto being "When the going gets tough, the tough get going." After getting some advice from Uncle Potluck, she decides that it is finally time for her and Mattie to stay put for once. That they weren't going to run anymore 'when the going gets tough'... Mattie doesn't agree at first. She is having a tough time adjusting and wants to get going... will they?

    Will Mattie stay "Hound Dog True"?

    It is a coming of age story of a painfully shy girl; a fifth grader who overcomes some of her fears by accepting what is, opening up and accepting how good things can be if she allows herself the opportunity.

    I truly recommend reading this book!

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2013

    LOVED IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I LOVED this book!!! It was just a wonderfull story of freindship and finding were you belong! I DEFINATLU recommend this book to everyone!!!!!!!!! : )

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2013

    It's official. I'm a fan of Linda Urban. What a sweet little bo

    It's official. I'm a fan of Linda Urban.

    What a sweet little book! I really love this story about a young girl and her seemingly insurmountable shyness. Maybe it is just the fact that I can relate so well to the story, but I love the way Ms. Urban captures the personality and thoughts of an introverted young girl. The characters in this book are fantastic. I love the way Quincy looks past Mattie's quiet demeanor and continues to befriend her. Quincy accepts Mattie the way she is, and even helps her overcome some of her fears.

    This is not the type of book that everyone will love, but I sure did.

    Linda Urban is also the author of A Crooked Kind of Perfect.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Read Linda Urban's, "Hound Dog True". It will inspire you with all the kindness and love and friendship in this book. You will love this book.

    This book will tell you how much the characters use love and kindness and lots more! But, I've read this book and love it. So I know you would love it too. And if you like it, please rate it. It will make the authur happy.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2014

    It is a great book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I feel like I am in the book in some parts! I am a big I mean big book reader. And tyi

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2013

    Jfjekdfjjc

    Hdjydkjfdhdd

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2013

    No.

    Even i could write better than this . If your lookong for a good long read this is terrible.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2014

    ARIEL

    WUZ HERE, GO TYPE 'MACBETH' IN THAT SEARCH BAR AND PRETEND YOUR A CAT! OR FOX! THEN GO TO 'ERIN HUNTER' OR 'WARRIORS' FOR MORE CHOICES!!!!!! THIS IS CALLED RPING!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2014

    Whats the point

    They only say hound dog true twice and what does it mean somebody answer me PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!ps not not recomended

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2014

    Pretty good

    Linda urban is a great author i had 2 readit for school and it is better than i thought i liked the part when Quincy pretended to be the good lint and Mattie was Moe the button off of her pjs and the where against the bad lint in the washing machine

    -Secret book lover

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2013

    Too confusing for young readers

    My 5th grade son has just read this book as well as myself to assist him in understanding most of it. He was completely bored with the subject matter and I felt the writing style to be very, very awkward for children. I understand the message that was trying to get out, but unfortunately it is lost in the poor writing. Maybe for an older person, but even I was bored with it as well as the charaters did not impress me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

    Good book

    I liked this book POOR MOE

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2013

    Hound Dog True by Linda Urban

    Hound Dog True iz a gud buk i likd it verri alot i tink u shud reed it it was verri gud reed it i rekomend it tu evrewun

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2012

    Loved it sooo.much

    Poor moe

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2012

    Love

    This is like the best book ever i love it it is the best

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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