Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Movie Tie-in Edition)

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Movie Tie-in Edition)

3.8 67
by Jesse Andrews
     
 

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The book that inspired the hit film!
 
Sundance U.S. Dramatic Audience Award
Sundance Grand Jury Prize
 
This is the funniest book you’ll ever read about death.
 
It is a universally acknowledged truth that high school sucks. But on the first day of his senior year, Greg Gaines thinks he’s figured

Overview

The book that inspired the hit film!
 
Sundance U.S. Dramatic Audience Award
Sundance Grand Jury Prize
 
This is the funniest book you’ll ever read about death.
 
It is a universally acknowledged truth that high school sucks. But on the first day of his senior year, Greg Gaines thinks he’s figured it out. The answer to the basic existential question: How is it possible to exist in a place that sucks so bad? His strategy: remain at the periphery at all times. Keep an insanely low profile. Make mediocre films with the one person who is even sort of his friend, Earl.
        This plan works for exactly eight hours. Then Greg’s mom forces him to become friends with a girl who has cancer. This brings about the destruction of Greg’s entire life.
        Fiercely funny, honest, heart-breaking—this is an unforgettable novel from a bright talent, now also a film that critics are calling "a touchstone for its generation" and "an instant classic."

Includes a discussion with Jesse Andrews and an annotated excerpt from the screenplay!

Also available from Jesse Andrews, The Haters.

STARRED REVIEW
“One need only look at the chapter titles (“Let’s Just Get This Embarrassing Chapter Out of the Way”) to know that this is one funny book.”
Booklist, starred review

STARRED REVIEW
“Though this novel begs inevitable thematic comparisons to John Green's The Fault in Our Stars (2011), it stands on its own in inventiveness, humor and heart.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

New York Times bestseller!

Capitol Choices 2013 - Noteworthy Titles for Children and Teens
Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC) Choices 2013 list - Young Adult Fiction
YALSA 2013 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers
YALSA 2013 Best Fiction for Young Adults
YALSA 2014 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419719462
Publisher:
Amulet Paperbacks
Publication date:
05/26/2015
Edition description:
Media Tie
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
21,219
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Videos

Meet the Author

Jesse Andrews is a writer, musician, and former German youth hostel receptionist. He is a graduate of Schenley High School and Harvard University and lives in Boston, which is almost as good as Pittsburgh. This is his first novel. Visit him online at www.jesseandrews.com.

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Me and Earl and the Dying Girl 3.8 out of 5 based on 5 ratings. 67 reviews.
ReadMe11 More than 1 year ago
Don't start this book with any expectations and you'll thoroughly enjoy it. The language is vulgar, but not too terribly distracting, since you're reading from first person perspective. I found myself laughing out loud when reading this book. I was reading quotes and passages to anyone who would listen. Although this book has a character that has Leukemia, this is not the main story line. It's more a story about a boy's journey in discovering himself during his senior year. I did tear up at the end, but I cry watching Hallmark commercials. I enjoyed Greg's character, and yes you wanted to smack him around a couple of times, but guess what...that's what helped build his character's story. Was it profound? No. Was is didactic? No. What is WAS...was wonderful! Could this book have been better? Sure...but I think I like the fact that it wasn't very heavy-handed. Take a chance and read this book. As a mom, I wouldn't let my young teen kids read this, but definitely I would let my older teens read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a high school English/Creative Writing teacher, I read many young adult books that my students have suggested or even simply mentioned in class. It just so happens this is one title my students had yet to mention. Upon the recommendation of the bookseller at BN, I decided to purchase it in the hopes that I would be able to share it with my students. Unfortunately, while the premise of the novel is amusing and the characters are mostly likeable, I found some of the content to be more adult in nature than I would feel comfortable with in regard to my students. Granted, they've all probably read, said,seen, etc., words or phrases like this before but I feel recommending this book as their English teacher would be rather inappropriate. Having said that, it was quite an entertaining read!
PaperTurtless More than 1 year ago
Light hearted and hilarious
Anonymous 9 months ago
Just finished it, still a little raw from all the emotion. But you have to read this book. It will move you.
Anonymous 11 months ago
This is the best book I've ever read. People won't like it because's it's the truth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's two dollars cheaper, better written, has more likable/believable characters, will make you laugh more, and is one of those remarkable books with cancer in them that doesn't treat the entire deal like saccharine tragedy porn. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is the natural answer to TFIOS, and it outshines it in every way. For readers who didn't like TFIOS, particularly those who didn't like how terminal illness was handled in that text, read this one. You'll be better for it.
codyroecker More than 1 year ago
With no expectations of this book, I picked it up at Powell's a few weeks ago and was blown away. This book is incredibly hilarious and moving. Greg Gaines is a character that has almost every thought imaginable and never ceases to surprise me. The way Jesse Andrews tells this tale is exceptional. The movie script formatting to the book gives it an extra flair and sets it apart from other novels of this caliber. I highly recommend this book and am beyond excited for the movie this summer. If you haven't read this, you need to. It is simply beautiful. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Definetly read it! I would not recomend it for >13 because on 1 page the f word was said almost 20 times. I was reading this in class and laughing almost every page. Its a great book!
Go4Jugular 24 hours ago
Admittedly, I pursued this book after inadvertently encountering the trailer for the movie, the thought then being that I'd read the book and subsequently enjoy the movie. Unfortunately, the book (which is always better than the movie, right?), wasn't even as good as the trailer, which leaves me a bit lost, except to return the book and hope the next owner enjoys it more than did I. For older, crankier readers such as myself, I thought the character development was shallow, the humor never seemed really to connect, and the emotion was unengaging. But I treat my books well, so there will be a used book in excellent condition available at Powell's shortly...
Anonymous 3 months ago
Got this book to hand out on world book night. Kept a copy for myself to read and absolutely loved it! If you read/liked/enjoyed/loved TFIOS then you will LOVE this one.
Anonymous 4 months ago
Yea the cancer factor was sad but the characters put a funny twist to it. It really made cry it was that funny
Anonymous 4 months ago
I cheated and watched the movie first and it was AMAZING!! I loved every second of it! I can't wait too read the book!
Anonymous 5 months ago
Awesome
TheThoughtSpot 7 months ago
Me and Earl and the Dying Girl surprised me with all the different perspectives it contains. Silly, interesting characters made me laugh out loud several times, but this story is also empathetic and emotional. The unique characters bring the book to life. Earl is blunt and sometimes gross. Greg is entertaining and sometimes struck with verbal diarrhea. Touching, emotional, silly and strange run through this book and make it a must-not-miss read!
JMTJTC 8 months ago
“One thing I've learned about people is that the easiest way to get them to like you is to shut up and let them do the talking.” Genre: Young Adult. Number of Pages: 295. Perspective: First. Location: Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is exactly as the name suggests. A high school senior, Greg, is forced to become friends with Rachel because she has cancer. Greg and his “coworker” Earl love to make horrible movies. So they decide to make a movie for Rachel. There has been a trend of death and dying in young adult fiction lately, especially cancer. Books like The Fault in Our Stars made it big and to the cinemas. In order for a young adult book about death and dying to be successful, it needs to be funny and emotional. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl attempted to be only funny and not emotional, which caused it to fall flat. I liked that the formatting resembled a movie script since the narrator loves to make no-budget films. That was probably the most interesting part of this book. I just didn’t like how he tried so hard to not be invested in anything. It just made the whole book feel emotionless and dry. To read the rest of my review, go here: http://judgingmorethanjustthecover.blogspot.com/2016/04/me-and-earl-and-dying-girl-jesse-andrews.html
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Testin
feather_lashes More than 1 year ago
Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is a standalone contemporary/young-adult novel written by author Jesse Andrews. You may read some reviews that reference this as a "cancer book", but it's not. Yes, one of the characters suffers from leukemia (I'm not spoiling anything - it's right there in the synopsis), but this book focuses on the characters and not just the circumstance, and I love that! One of the main aspects of this book is crude, laugh-out-loud humor. I think the dialogue does a descent job of representing the minds of adolescent boys and it's pretty great. However, if you are easily put off by spoken hormone-influenced thoughts, you may want to just wait for the movie to come out on DVD so you can fast-forward. Personally, I'm glad I read it and I would recommend it. It's awkward, interpersonal, and funny. On the surface, it seems somewhat meaningless and random...but on a deeper level it is anything but. These characters learn about life, struggle, and death...but I laughed like crazy and didn't cry once. It's not a cancer book. My favorite quote: “This book probably makes it seem like I hate myself and everything I do. But that's not totally true. I mostly just hate every person I've ever been. I'm actually fine with myself right now.”
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This felt true, everything about it was real.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am on my nook now if youwent to chart
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am not trying to insult you, in fact at some point in this I will praise you. You mentioned that the book wasn't well written, but i think that was the point. The story was to be told from te min character's perspective so the writing was a stylistic choice that helped us semorinto te main character's, well, chatacter. This reminded me of the writing in Perks of Being a Wallflower(although that one wasn't as "bad" because th main character is good at / enjoys reading and english.) And the Catcher in the Rye. I, and here's the part where I praise you, think that it takes a really good reader to enjoy this book and not think it was a little boring and plotless, which I myself had a bit of trouble trying to keep myself from falling into that trap, but I applaud you for being a good reader because it takes one to look deeper which this book practically requires you to do. However the plot also left me off on a sad but somewhat happy note because suddenly this girl he barely knew died and he basically lost his friend and then decided to go to film school. It all happened very quickly which can seem like bad plot, but it actually very good because thats kind of what life's like. So, though I seem somewhat negative towards this book, all those "flaws" actually make me have newfound appreciation for it and it is very beautiful in its own way, you just have to uncover the hidden beauty to truly know, which you seem to have done :) *sorry that as so long
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Turn_The_Page1 More than 1 year ago
The first half of the book is funny and moves a pretty good pace, but the momentum peters out in the last half. It was difficult to finish.
bmamca36 More than 1 year ago
Not my genre
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Um, hi. I wanna join, but i'm only in middle school
YoungMensanBookParade More than 1 year ago
Greg S. Gaines of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania has dedicated three of his 17 years trying to survive the social chaos that is high school. He has carefully constructed a friendly but distant relationship with everyone, except Earl, his movie-making colleague and “sort-of friend”. However, when Greg and Earl set out to begin their most difficult film yet- one about Rachel, a girl dying of leukemia, Greg’s social life comes crumbling down. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is a realistic fiction young adult novel, chiefly targeted towards high schoolers. Recently, it has also been made into a movie. Part of it is written as a screenplay, and it provides for an easy read and is written in an informal style. Keep in mind that profanity is common, but this is one of the methods in which Andrews reflects reality. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, and I give it four and a half stars. Greg’s character is lively, and Andrews conveys his flaws and quirks very well. In addition, Andrews writing style reflects the thoughts of a high school boy accurately, providing for a humorous read. However, I only recommend it to readers that can grasp and manage topics such as death and drugs, and also are mature enough to handle profanity. Although this book is about a girl dying of cancer, it’s not a romantic coming of age story, such as John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars. It describes the harsh reality and blunt truth about the hardships of cancer, high school, broken families, and both creating and holding on to friendships. Nonetheless, Andrews weaves humor in almost every page, creating a story that is as hilarious as it is believable. Review by Lauren A., age 14, Lone Star Mensa