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Murder on the Ile Saint-Louis (Aimee Leduc Series #7)
     

Murder on the Ile Saint-Louis (Aimee Leduc Series #7)

2.0 1
by Cara Black
 

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Parisian P.I. Aimée Leduc finds herself caring for an abandoned infant while trying to track down the child’s missing mother

Aimée Leduc is on a tight work deadline when an anonymous call leads her to an abandoned infant in her building's courtyard. Aimée's search for little Stella's mother that will soon have her on the run from a

Overview

Parisian P.I. Aimée Leduc finds herself caring for an abandoned infant while trying to track down the child’s missing mother

Aimée Leduc is on a tight work deadline when an anonymous call leads her to an abandoned infant in her building's courtyard. Aimée's search for little Stella's mother that will soon have her on the run from a cold-hearted killer and embroiled in a conflict between oil tycoons and environmental protesters.

Parisian private investigator Aimée Leduc is working on a tight deadline for a cybersecurity contract when she gets a phone call that disrupts all her progress. The female voice on the other end begs Aimée to go out into her courtyard, insists that her life is in danger, that Aimée must not call the police, then hangs up. Aimée’s project is in jeopardy, and her partner, René, will be furious if she botches this assignment, but she can’t ignore the distress in the mysterious caller’s voice. That doesn’t mean she’s prepared for what she finds in the courtyard, though: a newborn baby, wrapped in a blood-stained beaded jacket.

Aimée wants to track down the baby’s mother, but when a young woman’s body washes up in the Seine on the shores of the Ile Saint-Louis, the little island where Aimée herself lives, she realizes the situation is very dangerous. Paris has been rife with bomb threats linked to protesting environmental groups, and with a little investigating Aimée becomes convinced the baby, the body in the Seine, and the protests are somehow linked. Not that Aimée can afford distraction from her paying work right now--Leduc Detective is in bad financial straits. But despite themselves, Aimée and René have both fallen in love with the baby girl, whom Aimee nicknames Stella. Taking care of Stella’s needs—and protecting her from whoever hurt or killed her missing mother—must take priority over their computer security contract with a big publicity firm. Meanwhile, she’s following leads to the infant’s mother that take her to a radical dispossessed Polish prince, a community of homeless people who live in the sewer caves of the Seine, and a sexy documentary film maker. Can Aimée finish her security job, figure out who Stella belongs to, track down the missing mother, and protect herself and her friends from the danger that is circling them, all while juggling a newborn infant?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Murder on the Ile Saint-Louis

"This very dark Euro-thriller will have you wondering if it's not too late to book that summer vacation to Paris you always wanted. If time and money are stopping you, reading Murder on the Ile Saint-Louis may be a smart alternative."
—USA Today

"Now that every other mainstream mystery seems awash in gory religious rituals, it has fallen to independent publishers to keep a fresh perspective on the genre. Soho Press, one of the more enterprising of these small houses, has a keen nose for offbeat detectives who ply their trade in foreign locales. The trendy byways of Paris belong to Aimée Leduc, the clever young sleuth in a winning series by Cara Black . . . The energetic plot is thick with intrigue and danger."
—The New York Times Book Review

Praise for the Aimée Leduc series
 
"This very dark Euro-thriller will have you wondering if it's not too late to book that summer vacation to Paris you always wanted. If time and money are stopping you, reading Murder on the Ile Saint-Louis may be a smart alternative."
USA Today
 
“Haunting.”
The New York Times Book Review

“One of the best heroines in crime fiction.”
—Lee Child

“She makes Paris come alive as no one else has since Georges Simenon.”
—Stuart Kaminsky

“If you’ve never been to Paris, or you’d like to go back soon, let Cara Black transport you there.”
—Linda Fairstein
 
“One of the best new writers in the field today.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

Publishers Weekly

At the start of Black's gripping seventh mystery to feature Parisian computer expert Aimée Leduc (after 2006's Murder in Montmartre), a distraught, late-night anonymous phone call distracts Aimée from her deadline and sends her to the courtyard of her Ile Saint-Louis building, where she finds an infant girl. After the caller never shows up for her baby (whom Aimée decides to care for), Aimée wonders if the woman may have become an "Yvette," a Jane Doe dragged from the Seine. She follows a tenuous lead to discover the caller's identity, bringing her Samaritan impulses into direct conflict with her business sense. A wonderfully complex plot is lent immediacy by environmental activists agitating against a proposed oil agreement—secondary characters who play a crucial role in the intrigue. This Paris has a gritty, edgy feel, and Black's prose evokes the sound of the Seine rising with the spring thaw. Aimée makes an engaging protagonist, vulnerable beneath her vintage chic clothing and sharp-witted exterior. (Mar.)

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
An abandoned infant leads Leduc to dodge death and deception in the streets (and sewers) of Paris in her seventh caper. Black lives in San Francisco. (See review, p. 57.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Murder strikes close to home when Black's computer-security-expert heroine takes charge of an abandoned infant. Aimee Leduc (Murder in Montmartre, 2006, etc.) can't identify the voice that interrupts her late-night systems maintenance telling her to go down and look in her building's courtyard. But her partner, Rene Friant, learns that the call originated at a pay phone on Boulevard Henri IV, not two blocks away from Aimee's home on Ile Saint-Louis. Aimee is desperate to find out who placed the call, since it led her to an infant wrapped in a denim jacket. Unwilling to leave the foundling to the mercy of social services, Aimee, whose own mother disappeared when she was eight, leans on Rene and her friends Michou and Martine to help care for Stella, as she calls her, while she investigates the report of a corpse-perhaps the child's mother-floating in the Seine. Viewing the same body is Krzysztof Linski, the deposed Polish prince leading the MondeFocus effort to stop oil giant Alstrom from winning rights to drill in the North Sea. When someone plants a backpack filled with kerosene bombs on Krzysztof, Aimee turns to freelance filmmaker Claude Nederovique, whose footage of the MondeFocus rally she counts on to exonerate the prince and lead her to Stella's mother-and whose charms she cannot resist. Bittersweet musings on romantic and maternal love enliven an otherwise routine investigation. Agent: Linda Allen/Linda Allen Literary Agency

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781569474754
Publisher:
Soho Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/01/2008
Series:
Aimee Leduc Series , #7
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
341,240
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Cara Black is the author of sixteen books in the New York Times bestselling Aimée Leduc series. She lives in San Francisco with her husband and visits Paris frequently.

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Murder on the Ile Saint-Louis (Aimee Leduc Series #7) 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Paris locale is evoked beautifully but the plots of the novels in this series have become more disjointed as time goes by. Supposedly set in the 1990s, the technological sophistication of LeDuc's computer security business is pure 2000s. In 1995, lap tops weighed a ton and cell phones were the size of a loaf of bread. There is no real reason for the 1995 date and the mis-timed cultural references are distracting. I keep wanting to shout "Continuity!" The sub-plot involving her mother is wesring thin.