Player's Handbook: A Core Rulebook for the fifth edition of Dungeons & Dragons

Player's Handbook: A Core Rulebook for the fifth edition of Dungeons & Dragons

4.5 11
by Wizards RPG Team
     
 

 
Everything a player needs to create heroic characters for the world’s greatest roleplaying game
 
The Player’s Handbook® is the essential reference for every Dungeons & Dragons® roleplayer. It contains rules for character creation and advancement, backgrounds and skills, exploration and combat, equipment, spells, and…  See more details below

Overview

 
Everything a player needs to create heroic characters for the world’s greatest roleplaying game
 
The Player’s Handbook® is the essential reference for every Dungeons & Dragons® roleplayer. It contains rules for character creation and advancement, backgrounds and skills, exploration and combat, equipment, spells, and much more.
 
Use this book to create exciting characters from among the most iconic D&D® races and classes.
 
Dungeons & Dragons immerses you in a world of adventure. Explore ancient ruins and deadly dungeons. Battle monsters while searching for legendary treasures. Gain experience and power as you trek across uncharted lands with your companions.
 
The world needs heroes. Will you answer the call?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786965601
Publisher:
Wizards of the Coast
Publication date:
08/19/2014
Series:
D&D Core Rulebook Series
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
1,368
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.80(d)

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Player's Handbook: A Core Rulebook for the fifth edition of Dungeons & Dragons 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
TurboTurtle More than 1 year ago
For all who have their favorite D&D version all the way from AD&D to 4th edition I think we can all agree that getting together with your friends, some pizza and maybe 3 liters of Mountain Dew (or Shiner Bock) and doing a dungeon run is what it is all about. This new rule set scales back the heavy rules in favor of a streamlined game that leaves more room for the fun and an inviting game for the new gamer. Filled with helpful tables on everything from character creation to picking the right mystical deity for you this book has it all. I strongly recommend the beginner box as well as the adventure is perfect for a budding group of gamers and a new game master. Sit down, get some dice and have fun. This is the best.
Stazkat More than 1 year ago
I am new to D&D, and this book has been very user friendly. Easy to understand as a new player.
Dean60DE More than 1 year ago
A fun new edition to the classic franchise that does not disrespect the original and is as weighed down in charts and stats like 4th ed.
Shallowfoot More than 1 year ago
This is in my opinion the best edition since 2nd a nice balance of both. A nice touch of the old school with a twist of the new. Make's for good gaming both on & off the board. The book is of good quality and art recommended for any fantasy gamer.
Hmoulding More than 1 year ago
This is the latest rules book for Dungeon and Dragon, 5th edition, and it's a pretty book. The pictures are new, The format font face looks similar to what they've been using for the previous two editions. It has rules for character creation, and describes how the game is played. In short, it has lists of equipment and and spells. All of the stuff that's been in the previous books.  The principle behind these latest rules changes is to respond to the criticisms behind the 3rd and 4th edition rules. 3rd was deemed to fussy and detailed, making gaming sessions last too long. 4th streamlines that, but changed character classes in too much. In a way 5th feels like 2nd (better known as Advanced DnD) felt to me, except that THAC0 is gone.  However, since it is a reference book there are still some things that bug me, and you'd think that since this is their fourth go at this (3rd, 3.5th, and 4th came before) they'd get this part right. These are the reasons I dinged the book two stars: The type face is pretty, but it is too difficult to tell the difference between chapter sections and chapter subsections. The appendix looks like an afterthought, in tiny six point type. It is alphabetical, but not divided by starting letter, so it takes much longer to find something than it should even though it's only three pages long.  Many places in the book there are references to other chapters, but the pages don't have chapter headings or footings, so you have to use the table of contents to find the start of the chapter. And, almost worst of all, the cover doesn't clearly mark the book as 5th edition. Only the date 2014 on Mike Mearls' introduction gives a hint for what edition we're looking at. However, since Wizards has picked up again on the idea of organized game play where players can take their character to different groups, you'll want to get this book. It is pretty much indispensable for a metric buttload of fun.
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