×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Burning of Cherry Hill
     

The Burning of Cherry Hill

5.0 1
by A K Butler
 
It's 2159. Zay Scot is a fourteen-year-old boy raised on a secret island in hiding from a government he doesn't know exists. After more than a decade of avoiding detection, his fugitive parents are brutally kidnapped and he is thrust into a dizzying world centuries more advanced than the one he left behind.

The skies over the United North American Alliance are

Overview

It's 2159. Zay Scot is a fourteen-year-old boy raised on a secret island in hiding from a government he doesn't know exists. After more than a decade of avoiding detection, his fugitive parents are brutally kidnapped and he is thrust into a dizzying world centuries more advanced than the one he left behind.

The skies over the United North American Alliance are pollution free. Meals are healthy and delivered to each home. Crime is nonexistent. Medical treatment requires only the scan of your wrist. Poverty, need, and hunger are things studied in history class.

But Zay soon finds himself a fugitive, escaping the brute force of a government always a whisper away. Now he must choose between peace and freedom, and if the journey doesn't kill him, what he finds might start a war.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-15
Kids battle totalitarian sadists in this searing sci-fi novel. In the year 2159, roughly a century after World War III, young teenager Zay Scot and his little sister, Lina, are living an idyllic life of chores and gin rummy on Block Island. Then stormtroopers invade, burn the place, apparently kill their parents, Tavish and Ava, and haul the kids off to the mainland capital of the United North American Alliance. Like any dystopia, UNAA is a mixed bag. There are floating cars, helpful hover-bots that deliver personalized meals, awesome virtual-reality combat games at the skyscraper game center, and implanted scanners by which the government tracks everything citizens do, buy and email--for the citizens' safety and convenience, of course. But there's a downside: Dickensian foster homes; strict curfews; constant spying by yet more robots and cameras; the ever-present threat of electroshock-lashings from black-uniformed goons and their psychotic supervisors; and the experimental drugs they secretly sprinkle into those ready-to-eat robo-meals. Zay's refusal to log in to the all-seeing computer system plunges him into hot water, and with the help of a dissident underground, he and Lina set out to find the truth about their parents and a giant gulag known as Cherry Hill. Butler's yarn unfolds in punchy but evocative prose that's full of well-realized characters. Although the political economy of this imperfect future doesn't make a wholly reasonable amount of sense, the portrayal of its mechanisms of control is chillingly effective. Characters languish in an oppressive sense of helplessness under a state so domineering that citizens can't share a bite of food without the government's permission; in the background is an unspoken but ubiquitous brutality that emerges with gruesome realism in the electroshock scenes, which are both convincing and hard to read with their mixture of workaday jocularity and devilish cruelty. Steeped in teen martyrdom and paranoia about the total surveillance society, the narrative depends too much on plot contrivances, and the violence, profanity and sexual menace are a bit heavy for YA fare. The story wraps up rather patly, but the fictive world is sure to pull readers in. An imaginative, engrossing work of speculative fiction, like an Edward Snowden rewrite of The Hunger Games.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780988500419
Publisher:
Flexion House
Publication date:
03/01/2013
Pages:
284
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.64(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Burning of Cherry Hill 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MadeusBooks More than 1 year ago
Do not underestimate this book. Here is the honest truth: some books you read and forget, letting them collect dust on a distant shelf, while others seem to imprint themselves into your very soul, never leaving. “The Burning of Cherry Hill” is, without a doubt, the later. This book was more than I ever expected it to be and it left me breathless, heartbroken and wanting more. The characters were precious and each stood out on their own. Zay Scott, especially, has found a special place in my heart. The relationship with his sister, the importance of family and his courage to do what was right stood out above all others. His strength grew with each chapter and I felt like I was on the journey with him. In the beginning, the cover art is what really drew my attention to the book and I found out that, like the cover, this story is truly a work of art. The world of 2159 is a world so like, yet unlike, our own. The parallels are very disconcerting to me. Technology, brilliant and incredible technology, is used by the government to have supreme control over the words and actions of its citizens. Fear and ignorance are the driving force of everything. People who believe the lies of those in power because they fear the consequences of disobedience. Citizens who “vanish” because they utter words like “strike” and “garden” to close friends. People who believed themselves to be insignificant against the tide of power. But because of courage and love of family  that all changed. This story did something else as well. It reminded me of the power that a few words can have. words like “vanish” and “promise”. How often a day do we make promises to people? Zay had to make promises, not the “try-your-best-and-hope-it-works-out promises” kind, as his father said, but the “if-you-don’t-keep-them-we-could-all-die” kind. How often do we take our words (and our freedom to speak those words without fear of “vanishing”) for granted? I’ll leave this review with a question that Zay has inspired me to ask myself: Why don’t we practice courage everyday?  Maybe the world would be better if we did. After all, “some days are very precious,very rare”. I will be sure to make today my very, always.