The Chaos of Stars

( 11 )

Overview

Kiersten White, New York Times bestselling author of Paranormalcy, is back with The Chaos of Stars, an enchanting novel set in Egypt and San Diego that captures the magic of first love and the eternally complicated truth about family. Blending Ally Carter's humor and the romance of Cynthia Hand's Unearthly, The Chaos of Stars takes readers on an unforgettable journey halfway across the world and back, and proves there's no place like home.

Isadora's family is seriously screwed ...

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Overview

Kiersten White, New York Times bestselling author of Paranormalcy, is back with The Chaos of Stars, an enchanting novel set in Egypt and San Diego that captures the magic of first love and the eternally complicated truth about family. Blending Ally Carter's humor and the romance of Cynthia Hand's Unearthly, The Chaos of Stars takes readers on an unforgettable journey halfway across the world and back, and proves there's no place like home.

Isadora's family is seriously screwed up—which comes with the territory when you're the human daughter of the Egyptian gods Isis and Osiris. Isadora is tired of her immortal relatives and their ancient mythological drama, so when she gets the chance to move to California with her brother, she jumps on it. But her new life comes with plenty of its own dramatic—and dangerous—complications . . . and Isadora quickly learns there's no such thing as a clean break from family.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sixteen-year-old Isadora talks a bit like a spoiled California teen, but she doesn’t actually become one until her mother sends her to San Diego to keep her safe. Until that point, Isadora lives in an ancient temple complex in the Egyptian desert—this is because her mother is the goddess Isis, and her father is Osiris. What the danger is and why it apparently follows Isadora to America is unclear, hinted at only in dreams. Isadora would rather think about how much she wants to spite her mother, redecorate every room she enters (she’s an aspiring interior designer), and not fall in love with the beautiful Greek boy, Ry, who’s hanging around. As a character, Isadora is (by design) fairly arrogant and self-absorbed, but she also has a point: it’s hard to understand why immortal parents would purposely give their child mortality. White (Mind Games) uses her technical prowess with narrative forms to break up the story, and she brings an irreverent sense of humor to Egyptian myth. Parents you’re literally supposed to worship? Gross. Ages 13–up. Agent: Michelle Wolfson, Wolfson Literary. (Sept.)
VOYA - Meghann Meeusen
When Isadora's newly pregnant mother starts having worrisome dreams, Isadora realizes this might be her chance to escape her ritualistic home life and move in with her brother in California, where she will be safe and free in a way she has never been before. Yet teenage independence is a little more complicated when your parents are actually immortal ancient Egyptian gods, and soon Isadora realizes that while she is enjoying designing a new museum exhibit and trying to stay "just friends" with an alluring Greek boy named Orion, she might actually be facing more danger than she could ever imagine. The Chaos Of Stars sets the drama of family within a world of ancient deities living in contemporary society, wherein extended families have thousands of years of history and mysticism is very real. Still, the most real part of this novel is Isadora's sense of internal conflict over her relationships—both with the parents she believes are indifferent to her and the romantic interest she resists because she cannot trust in love. Eloquent in its mixing of Egyptology with the experience of being a teenager, Isadora's story adds something unique to recent literary trends that blend the ancient world with the modern, and the character development, action-packed climax, intriguing family dynamics, and heartfelt romance will draw in readers who count themselves among the fans of this genre. Reviewer: Meghann Meeusen
School Library Journal
09/01/2013
Gr 8 Up—Life is lonely when you're the 16-year-old mortal daughter of Egyptian gods. Isadora has been constantly reminded of her mortality ever since her parents, Isis and Osiris, showed her her own tomb as a young girl. Tired of her family's long history of feuding and scheming, she is counting the days until she is old enough to get away and live a normal life. That opportunity arrives when some bad dreams and an unexpected visitor cause Isis to send the teen to live with relatives in San Diego because home is no longer safe. Thinking that she is finally out of her parents' reach, Isadora is quickly proven wrong when she learns that her mother wants her to volunteer at a local museum to earn her allowance. Although she is wary of relationships, she can't resist befriending Tyler, a feisty girl and fellow volunteer. And despite her belief that love leads to chaos and disaster, Isadora gets close to Tyler's gorgeous poet friend, Ry. The strong bonds she forms help her appreciate her parents and embrace love for the sake of loving. White cleverly uses Egyptian mythology to depict teenage angst and generational conflict in a light, witty style. Although the characters are simplistic, the themes are clear and well executed. Readers looking for a fresh take on paranormal stories will find a lot to love in this romance.—Joy Piedmont, LREI, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
The relationship between a teen and her parents is complicated--especially if that family is full of Egyptian gods. Despite the promising premise, this latest from White achieves only demigod status at best. Isadora is the daughter of Isis and Osiris, who are unusual parents, and she's not your typical teen either. Her days are an odd combination of interior design and god worship. But although her parents are immortal Egyptian gods, they will let her die instead of keeping her with them forever. This discovery launches Isadora on a petulant, stubborn journey. When Isis gets pregnant ahead of the normal schedule, Isadora won't tell her mother about her dark prophetic dreams. Sent to San Diego to stay with her older brother, Isadora tries to get some distance from her mother while struggling with her feelings for the beautiful, much-too-perfect Ry, a boy who writes epic poetry. Meanwhile, Isadora doesn't pay attention to the signs that someone is after her, not until it's nearly too late and her mother is in danger. It's never clear just who Isadora is; her voice never fully jells into her own, neither modern girl nor ancient child of the gods. Supporting characters such as Ry are flat and two-dimensional, and the danger to Isis is not compelling enough to catch readers up. This novel won't gain the Egyptian gods many new worshippers. (Fantasy. 12 & up)
Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)
“Eloquent in its mixing of Egyptology with the experience of being a teenager, Isadora’s story adds something unique to recent literary trends that blend the ancient world with the modern, and the character development, action-packed climax, intriguing family dynamics, and heartfelt romance will draw in fans of this genre.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062135926
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/10/2013
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 78,894
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.88 (w) x 8.38 (h) x 1.09 (d)

Meet the Author

Kiersten White

Kiersten White is the New York Times bestselling author of the Paranormalcy trilogy, Mind Games, and The Chaos of Stars. Although originally meant to be about a femme fatale, the Mind Games series quickly turned into a story about two sisters and impossible choices. This may be because Kiersten has three sisters, none of whom she has killed for, but all of whom she has considered killing at one point or another. Kiersten lives with her family near San Diego, California.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 11, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Another element I love to read in book is mythology is God and G

    Another element I love to read in book is mythology is God and Goddess. I think the whole theory is fascinating! When an author takes the books and throws a twist in there, I can’t wait to read it.

    Plot: What would you do if your parents were Gods? I think that be pretty cool. I really enjoyed getting into this plot and learning everything about them.The main character, Isadora is quite the gal. She is strong yet wants to be independent. Be her own person instead of who she is called to be. The daughter of a god, destined to die mortal and worship her parents. Each chapter lead up to growth of Isadore and her becoming who she wants to be. She learns more about herself and others around her. She begins to think differently.

    Love: I think that this is the coolest part ever! It is so neat how well this author pieced the entire story together using stars. I loved watching this friendship grow into more. Watching these two characters let down their guard and trust on another is a bog step. I think they both have characteristics that each can learn from. Still, I think the way this particular element of stars is super cool.

    Drama: Not only does this book have good use of stars but it also pertains lots of drama between the Gods. I mean, duh? How can you not. The struggle for power and worship is fierce in the book leading for some good action and plot twists.

    Overall, I love this book! It was a quick, easy read that I divulge instantly. The plot is simple yet contains so much in characters and plot. Held together with beautifully written tales of power and betrayal, The Chaos Of Star is awesome.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The Chaos of Stars might sound like the usual mythology book, ex

    The Chaos of Stars might sound like the usual mythology book, except it is egyptian mythology but is such an easy, breezy read with a great contemporary feel. I personally couldn't put it down and ended up finishing it very quickly. Usually in novels, I don't enjoy the various types of intros in the beginning of each chapter, whether it is a snippet of a poem, a quote, a flashback, or a short story within the actual story. However in The Chaos of Stars, the little intros introduce us and give us background information on all the egyptian gods. I personally never knew much about egyptian mythology, other than knowing who Isis is. However, The Chaos of Stars narrates little stories in such a fun way, through the voice of the main protagonist, Isadora, and you can't help but retain this information. When I went to The Metropolitan Museum of Arts in New York this August, I went into the Egyptian section and it was such a fun experience since I knew about all the gods that were mentioned which were on the cards accompanying the artifacts and art pieces there. Going back to the novel, I think Isadora is a very unique female protagonist. She does have her insecurities with her family, since she is the offspring of two gods who have a child every 20 years just to keep the praying and glorification to them going. But other than that, I felt she was a very mature and independent girl. She never really had insecurities with her looks, guys, or 'finding herself'. After introductions for the novel, Isadora moves to California where she starts working at a museum as well as make friends and meet an intriguing boy *oh la la*. Yes, there is the egyptian mythology but it isn't suffocatingly only revolving around that. I personally loved all the characters. They were laid back, and the plot itself was great and I definitely recommend it to all YA readers.  

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2013

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** The Chaos of

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***




    The Chaos of Stars by Kiersten White
    Publisher: HarperTeen
    Publication Date: September 10, 2013
    Rating: 4 stars
    Source: eARC from Edelweiss




    Summary (from Goodreads):




    Isadora’s family is seriously screwed up.




    Of course, as the human daughter of Egyptian gods, that pretty much comes with the territory. She’s also stuck with parents who barely notice her, and a house full of relatives who can’t be bothered to remember her name. After all, they are going to be around forever—and she’s a mere mortal.




    Isadora’s sick of living a life where she’s only worthy of a passing glance, and when she has the chance to move to San Diego with her brother, she jumps on it. But Isadora’s quickly finding that a “normal” life comes with plenty of its own epic complications—and that there’s no such thing as a clean break when it comes to family. Much as she wants to leave her past behind, she can’t shake the ominous dreams that foretell destruction for her entire family. When it turns out there may be truth in her nightmares, Isadora has to decide whether she can abandon her divine heritage after all.




    What I Liked:




    Okay, I'll admit, I had a hard time starting this one. I read about half a percent on my Kindle, and couldn't get past it. Not because it was distasteful or boring, but because I heard things about this book. I heard that the heroine was whiny. I personally HATE whiny. So I put off this book as long as possibly because while I knew I would have to read this book eventually, I didn't want to deal with the whiny.




    Well, people. I have no problem admitting that I was stupid to listen to those people, and stupid for waiting so long to read this book, and stupid for thinking that a whiny heroine would make me hate this book. Because honestly, Isadora was a bit whiny at times. But I really enjoyed this entire book. I am obsessed with Egyptian mythology, so I am glad that I stuck with this book.




    Isadora is getting away from her Egyptian god and goddess family - for good, she hopes. Her mother, Isis, is having another baby. But then, Isis has a baby every twenty years. But Isadora is only sixteen. Why four years early? Isadora thinks her father, Osiris, doesn't know she exists, and her mother only cares about the new baby. Isadora also found out that she isn't a goddess, and that she won't be around forever.




    So, yes, Isadora is unhappy about all of that. She does whine and complain about all that. She hates her older brother Horus and his despicable wife Hathor. She doesn't like her creepy half-brother Anubis. Her aunt Nephthys seems to care about her, and Thoth, the god of wisdom, but who knows. I understand why Isadora felt invisible. No one really loved her like she wanted them to love her.




    So, her mother sends her to San Diego, on the pretense of having bad dreams about Isadora's safety. Isadora lives with her brother Sirus and his wife Deena, who is very close to giving birth to her own child. Isadora is happy  in San Diego, and she eventually grows to love the museum volunteering gig her mother forced her to do.




    She meets Tyler, a girl about her age, who helps at the museum. Tyler is an amazing character! I love vivaciousness. Isadora also meets Orion - or "Ry" - who Isadora immediately attempts to dislike. Isadora doesn't want to love anyone, but she slowly falls in love with Ry. 




    I love Ry! Not just as a love interest, but as a character with an important role in this book. As soon as Isadora goes into his house, I KNEW what was up with him and his parents. You'll read it, and you'll see. It's obvious, and very cool. Ry is cool. He's sweet and caring and understanding. He's not a "bad boy", or whatever. I really like him.




    The climax of this book has to do with an old legend. Read the top part of each chapter. READ IT. It's important. The eARC doesn't really make the top part of the chapter and the actual chapter very different. But the hardcover and paperback copies might have that top part in italics. Read it - it helps you understand the climax. I had a feeling that several key characters were behind the big conflict - but one of them, I did not expect. Bravo on White's part, for building the suspense!




    Character development - that is huge. One of the reasons why I took so long to read this book was because I heard people say that Isadora was whiny. I agree, she was. But this changes as the story goes on. Isadora is a very different girl by the end of the book - for the better.




    No love triangle - it's just Ry and Isadora, and the progression of their relationship is beautiful to read. I was wondering how the end would work out, for the two of them, but I really like it. The end is a great end!




    What I Did Not Like:




    I did mention that I understood Isadora's whining - but to an extent. I totally understand both sides of the conflict. I get why Isadora was mad at her parents - especially her mother. But I could why Isis did things that she did. Sirus, Isadora's brother, explained things to Isadora that made sense. Isadora sees things the way an irrational teenager sees them. So, in that sense, I didn't like Isadora. Sometimes, her whining was unbearable. Other times, it takes one teenager to know one.




    The climax was over pretty quickly. I mean, once Isadora figures out who and what and where, the falling action happens quickly. And then the end. Just something I noticed.




    Would I Recommend It:




    I would! I absolutely LOVE Egyptian mythology, and it was clear to me that White did her research. This book is definitely my favorite, of White's books that I have read!




    Rating:




    4 stars. The lesson for me: if I want to read something, no matter what I hear, read it and decide for myself!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    ¿And I¿d choose you; in a hundred lifetimes, in a hundred worlds

    “And I’d choose you; in a hundred lifetimes, in a hundred worlds, in any version of reality, I’d find you and I’d choose you.”



    I knew I'd like The Chaos of Stars before I ever read a single word. Even now, I wish I could find something else similar to it. Miss White did an absolutely wonderful job meshing Egyptian mythology with reality.




    Isadora is the human daughter of Isis and Osiris¿. Apparently, immortality is given by the discretion of her parents and isn't something their children are born with. That definitely makes for an interesting story. I mean, if you're immortal and have the power to make all of your children immortal, why not do that?




    Devastated that she is impermanent, Isadora has spent the last three years building walls between herself and her mother. After learning that Isis is expecting another child, she takes the first chance she gets to convince her mother and father to let her go live in California with her thirty-something year old brother. It doesn't exactly help things that the rest of her immortal family can hardly remember her name. But when she gets to California, she doesn't feel any better. At this point, she's completely sworn off love and doesn't believe either of her parents love her at all. Love is just an opening for pain.




    The Chaos of Stars was a beautiful journey about a girl learning that even though she wasn't loved the way she wanted, she was still loved unconditionally.




    And who better to teach her how to love than the very handsome and kind Ry?




    Isadora's narrative was wonderful and full of personality. It isn't long before one of her new-found friends starts "discretely" setting her up with Ry. And Isadora finds that she has a lot more in common with him and understands him, more than she thought she would. I've got to hand to Ry, he is one patient dude. He never pushes her, he listens, and he tries his best to help her. He really genuinely tries to be her friend. I'll admit, I pretty much saw Ry's background coming for probably half the book but it wasn't confirmed till towards the end. But, honestly, it wasn't that big a deal.




    I was worried there for a bit that the ending would be anti-climatic. Things seems to wind down not long before they actually began. But then Isadora started realizing that her initial thoughts were wrong and it all becomes a race to get back to Egypt. And things just kept going until the last few pages or so.




    Honestly, Miss White left me completely satisfied and wanting more of this young adult urban fantasy with a twist of mythology from her.

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  • Posted January 11, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I liked the premise of this book, but, once I started reading it

    I liked the premise of this book, but, once I started reading it, I found the story to be less than engaging.

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  • Posted September 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

        Okay, I will admit, got off to a confused start because I kn

        Okay, I will admit, got off to a confused start because I know nothing about Greek mythology much less Egyptian and the names and implications that I probably should know a bit about the backstory threw me for a bit, but I soon figured out the important pieces. I was sent for review though, so I kept reading, and boy am I glad that I did. 
        Things really picked up for me once Isadora came to the US. I came to appreciate her voice even more, and I liked that she was tough, I loved her snark, and I also admired the vulnerability under it all. It is fun to see her adjusting to the culture, and always lends a light moment. I can't imagine coming here and really only cultural experience is from tv or a teen movie, lol. 
        And oh man, do I wish there were a picture of Ry. My imagination does a pretty good job, but I feel for the slightly antisocial, hot and secretly sweet and amazing guy. It was hard to see how Isadora held love and friendship at arm's length though because she didn't want to get hurt and was convinced that love would end and wasn't worth it. 
        Also, Tyler was amazing. She is also "working" at the museum and she takes Isadora under her wing. She is just this side of awkward which makes me connect with her immediately, because that could describe me. 
        The characters are amazing, I loved every interaction, serious to funny, and always wanted more. Isadora was unique in her culture, the way she grew up with gods and goddesses but is not one, and also that she has a passion that comes through, her interior design. I love how that was a theme throughout the book and also kept Ry in the picture even when she decides that she is attracted but doesn't want to have a relationship but doesn't want to get hurt. There is action too, and that kept things moving. 
        It was also a lot of fun to see the relationship between Isadora and her parents, especially her mom Isis evolve. They learn so much about each other, and that was a great plot element. 
        The ending was well done, and glad it tied up things pretty well. I am still really eager to get the next in the series. 




    Bottom Line: Great characters, so glad I picked it up. 

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  • Posted September 15, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Mythology, sarcasm, adventure, romance, and good food... I'm not

    Mythology, sarcasm, adventure, romance, and good food... I'm not sure I could ask for more in a book!! 

    Oh wait, there's also the really flawed and broken main character that is figuring out who she is and what she wants from life. 

    And there's a swoony boy with dark hair and blue eyes, which everyone knows is my biggest weakness. 

    I've been a fan of Kiersten's from the day Paranormalcy was published. I thoroughly enjoyed that series. I was intrigued (and a little freaked out) by Mind Games. Which reminds me... I need that sequel soon!! But this book, this is Kiersten's best book so far!! 

    I've read a couple of reviews that said this book was hard to get into. I didn't have that problem but I can see that the first few chapters could be a bit difficult. There's a lot of background and character information to establish in those first few pages- don't give up, it will be worth it- I promise!!

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    Posted April 13, 2014

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    Posted November 25, 2013

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