The Scottish Prisoner (Lord John Grey Series)

( 183 )

Overview

London, 1760. For Jamie Fraser, paroled prisoner-of-war in the remote Lake District, life could be worse: He’s not cutting sugar cane in the West Indies, and he’s close enough to the son he cannot claim as his own. But Jamie Fraser’s quiet existence is coming apart at the seams, interrupted first by dreams of his lost wife, then by the appearance of Tobias Quinn, an erstwhile comrade from the Rising.
 
Like many of the Jacobites who aren’t...

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Overview

London, 1760. For Jamie Fraser, paroled prisoner-of-war in the remote Lake District, life could be worse: He’s not cutting sugar cane in the West Indies, and he’s close enough to the son he cannot claim as his own. But Jamie Fraser’s quiet existence is coming apart at the seams, interrupted first by dreams of his lost wife, then by the appearance of Tobias Quinn, an erstwhile comrade from the Rising.
 
Like many of the Jacobites who aren’t dead or in prison, Quinn still lives and breathes for the Cause. His latest plan involves an ancient relic that will rally the Irish. Jamie is having none of it—he’s sworn off politics, fighting, and war. Until Lord John Grey shows up with a summons that will take him away from everything he loves—again.
 
Lord John Grey—aristocrat, soldier, and occasional spy—finds himself in possession of a packet of explosive documents that exposes a damning case of corruption against a British officer. But they also hint at a more insidious danger. Time is of the essence as the investigation leads to Ireland, with a baffling message left in “Erse,” the tongue favored by Scottish Highlanders. Lord John recognizes the language all too well from his time as governor of Ardsmuir Prison, when it was full of Jacobite prisoners, including a certain Jamie Fraser.
 
Soon Lord John and Jamie are unwilling companions on the road to Ireland, a country whose dark castles hold dreadful secrets, and whose bogs hide the bones of the dead. A captivating return to the world Diana Gabaldon created in her Outlander and Lord John series, The Scottish Prisoner is another masterpiece of epic history, wicked deceit, and scores that can only be settled in blood.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

London, 1760. For Jamie Fraser, paroled prisoner-of-war in the remote Lake District, life could be worse: He's not cutting sugar cane in the West Indies, and he's close enough to the son he cannot claim as his own. But Jamie Fraser's quiet existence is actually coming apart at the seams, interrupted first by dreams of his lost wife, then by the appearance of Tobias Quinn, an erstwhile comrade from the Rising.

Publishers Weekly
Jamie Fraser, a Scottish Jacobite from Gabaldon's bestselling Outlander series, is back and in the spotlight in the newest Lord John novel (after An Echo in the Bone). Having been arrested and paroled to the Lake District, Fraser has fathered a child with a noblewoman, though he cannot claim him lest he put his son's inheritance at risk. While engrossed in this complicated familial situation, Lord John Grey appears with an enigmatic letter that Grey suspects of containing clues to a political conspiracy. However, the mysterious message is written in the language of the Scottish Highlanders, which only Fraser can translate. His interpretation reveals the schemes of a corrupt—and potentially traitorous—military officer, Siverly. Promised his freedom by Grey's brother, Hal, in exchange for his help in tracking down Siverly, Fraser embarks on a quest fraught with murder, espionage, and the dredging-up of potent secrets. A complicated plot will likely baffle new readers, but long-time Gabaldon fans will find plenty to love. Agent: Russell Galen, Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary. (Nov.)
Kirkus Reviews
Vintage historical drama from seasoned veteran Gabaldon (An Echo in the Bone, 2009, etc.), another volume in her Lord John series. Jamie Fraser, the star of the show, gets around, despite being confined to quarters—a nice estate in the Lake District, granted—for having chosen the wrong side during the Jacobite rebellion. Yet, proud Scotsman that he is, how could he have done otherwise? He's the definition of dashing, though his spirits have been dashed at the death of his beloved wife. For their parts, Lord John and his brother Hal, loyal defenders of the crown, find they have need of Jamie when they set out to chase down a corrupt officer, "determined to bring Major Gerald Siverly to justice." Siverly is a bad, bad man—think the Jason Isaacs character in the Mel Gibson movie The Patriot—who doesn't think twice about killing his own men for his nefarious ends; if he had a handlebar mustache, he'd be twirling it. Meanwhile, the Greys, morally ambiguous chaps themselves, have deeper and darker reasons to want to put Siverly down. What more could you expect from a fop who heads an organization called the Society for the Appreciation of the English Beefsteak? A historical drama wouldn't be worth its salt without a grail, and Gabaldon obliges with a not completely cooked through yarn about an ancient Gaelic poem, a hidden treasure (with clues tucked away, of course, in an abbey) and a romp through the wilds of Ireland and Scotland. Gabaldon's formula is as reliable as an old Flash Gordon episode: There are the requisite villains, sneaky and dastardly, and good guys who are very good. But the author also has a nice, sometimes bawdy sense of humor—one of those villains earns the sobriquet "that wee arse-wipe," and some of the adult interactions in the story are very adult indeed. A bonus for longtime fans of the series: Unlike some of the earlier books, where they have been known to wander offstage, Fraser and the Greys are on hand for most of the action. A not strictly chronological but thoroughly entertaining entry in a franchise that shows no signs of running out of steam.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385337519
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 11/29/2011
  • Series: Lord John Grey Series
  • Pages: 560
  • Sales rank: 320,785
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.52 (h) x 1.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Diana  Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon is the New York Times bestselling author of the wildly popular Outlander novels—Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, Drums of Autumn, The Fiery Cross, A Breath of Snow and Ashes (for which she won a Quill Award and the Corine International Book Prize), and An Echo in the Bone—as well as one work of nonfiction, The Outlandish Companion; the Outlander graphic novel The Exile; and the bestselling series featuring Lord John Grey, a character she introduced in her Outlander series. She lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Biography

To millions of fans, Diana Gabaldon is the creator of a complex, original, and utterly compelling amalgam of 18th-century romantic adventure and 20th-century science fiction. To the publishing industry, she's a grassroots-marketing phenomenon. And to would-be writers everywhere who worry that they don't have the time or expertise to do what they love, Gabaldon is nothing short of an inspiration.

Gabaldon wrote her first novel while juggling the demands of motherhood and career: in between her job as an ecology professor, she also had a part-time gig writing freelance software reviews. Gabaldon had never written fiction before, and didn't intend to publish this first novel, which she decided to call Outlander. This, she decided, would be her "practice novel". Worried that she might not be able to pull a plot and characters out of thin air, she settled on a historical novel because "it's easier to look things up than to make them up entirely."

The impulse to set her novel in 18th-century Scotland didn't stem -- as some fans have assumed—from a desire to explore her own familial roots (in fact, Gabaldon isn't even Scottish). Rather, it came from watching an episode of the British sci-fi series Dr. Who and becoming smitten with a handsome time traveler in a kilt. A time-travel element crept into Gabaldon's own book only after she realized her wisecracking female lead couldn't have come from anywhere but the 20th century. The resulting love affair between an intelligent, mature, sexually experienced woman and a charismatic, brave, virginal young man turned the conventions of historical romance upside-down.

Gabaldon has said her books were hard to market at first because they were impossible to categorize neatly. Were they historical romances? Sci-fi adventure stories? Literary fiction? Whatever their genre (Gabaldon eventually proffered the term "historical fantasias"), they eventually found their audience, and it turned out to be a staggeringly huge one.

Even before the publication of Outlander, Gabaldon had an online community of friends who'd read excerpts and were waiting eagerly for more. (In fact, her cohorts at the CompuServe Literary Forum helped hook her up with an agent.) Once the book was released, word kept spreading, both on the Internet and off, and Gabaldon kept writing sequels. (When her fourth book, "Drums of Autumn," was released, it debuted at No. 1 on the Wall Street Journal bestseller list, and her publisher, Delacorte, raced to add more copies to their initial print run of 155,000.)

With her books consistently topping the bestseller lists, it's apparent that Gabaldon's appeal lies partly in her ability to bulldoze the formulaic conventions of popular fiction. Salon writer Gavin McNett noted approvingly, "She simply doesn't pay attention to genre or precedent, and doesn't seem to care that identifying with Claire puts women in the role of the mysterious stranger, with Jamie -- no wimp in any regard -- as the romantic 'heroine."'

In between Outlander novels, Gabaldon also writes historical mysteries featuring Lord John Grey, a popular, if minor, character from the series, and is working on a contemporary mystery series. Meanwhile, the author's formidable fan base keeps growing, as evidenced by the expanding list of Gabaldon chat rooms, mailing lists, fan clubs and web sites -- some of them complete with fetching photos of red-haired lads in kilts.

Good To Know

Outlander may have been Gabaldon's first novel, but she was already a published writer. Her credits included scholarly articles, political speeches, radio ads, computer manuals and Walt Disney comic books.

Gabaldon gets 30 to 40 e-mails a day from her fans, who often meet online to discuss her work. "I got one letter from a woman who had been studying my book jacket photos (with a magnifying glass, evidently), who demanded to know why there was a hole in my pants," wrote Gabaldon on her web site. "This strikes me as a highly metaphysical question, which I am not equipped to answer, but which will doubtless entertain some chat-groups for quite a long time."

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    1. Also Known As:
      Diana Jean Gabaldon (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Flagstaff, Arizona
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 11, 1952
    2. Place of Birth:
      Flagstaff, Arizona
    1. Education:
      B.S., Northern Arizona University, 1973; M.S., Scripps Oceanographic Institute; Ph.D., Northern Arizona University, 1979
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

1 April Fool Helwater, the Lake District April 1, 1760 It was so cold out, he thought his cock might break off in his hand—­if he could find it. The thought passed through his sleep-­mazed mind like one of the small, icy drafts that darted through the loft, making him open his eyes.

He could find it now; had waked with his fist wrapped round it and desire shuddering and twitching over his skin like a cloud of midges. The dream was wrapped just as tightly round his mind, but he knew it would fray in seconds, shredded by the snores and farts of the other grooms. He needed her, needed to spill himself with the feel of her touch still on him.

Hanks stirred in his sleep, chuckled loudly, said something incoherent, and fell back into the void, murmuring, “Bugger, bugger, bugger . . .”

Jamie said something similar under his breath in the Gaelic and flung back his blanket. Damn the cold.

He made his way down the ladder into the half-­warm, horse-­smelling fug of the barn, nearly falling in his haste, ignoring a splinter in his bare foot. He hesitated in the dark, still urgent. The horses wouldn’t care, but if they noticed him, they’d make enough noise, perhaps, to wake the others.

Wind struck the barn and went booming round the roof. A strong chilly draft with a scent of snow stirred the somnolence, and two or three of the horses shifted, grunting and whickering. Overhead, a murmured “ ’ugger” drifted down, accompanied by the sound of someone turning over and pulling the blanket up round his ears, defying reality.

Claire was still with him, vivid in his mind, solid in his hands. He could imagine that he smelled her hair in the scent of fresh hay. The memory of her mouth, those sharp white teeth . . . He rubbed his nipple, hard and itching beneath his shirt, and swallowed.

His eyes were long accustomed to the dark; he found the ­vacant loose box at the end of the row and leaned against its boards, cock already in his fist, body and mind yearning for his lost wife.

He’d have made it last if he could, but he was fearful lest the dream go altogether, and he surged into the memory, groaning. His knees gave way in the aftermath and he slid slowly down the boards of the box into the loose piled hay, shirt rucked round his thighs and his heart pounding like a kettledrum.

Lord, that she might be safe was his last conscious thought. She and the child.

p[

He plunged at once into a sleep so deep and luxurious that when a hand shook him by the shoulder, he didn’t spring to his feet but merely stirred sluggishly, momentarily befuddled by the prickle of hay on his bare legs. His instincts came back to life in sudden alarm and he flung himself over, getting his feet under him in the same motion that put his back against the wall of the loose box.

There was a gasp from the small form in the shadows before him, and he classified it as feminine just in time to restrain himself from reflexive violence.

“Who’s that?” he demanded. He spoke low, his voice hoarse with sleep, and the form swayed back a little farther, exhibiting dubiousness.

He was in no mood for foolishness and shot out a hand, grabbing her by the arm. She squealed like a pig and he let go as though she were red-­hot, cursing himself mentally as he heard the startled grunts and rustlings of his fellow grooms overhead.

“What the devil’s that?” Crusoe demanded, in a voice like a clogged pipe. Jamie heard him clear his throat and spit thickly into his half-­filled pot, then bellow down the ladder, “Who’s there?”

The shadowy form was making wild motions, beseeching him to be silent. The horses were half awake, snorting with mild confusion but not panicked; they were used to Crusoe shouting in the night. He did it whenever he had the money to buy drink, waking from nightmares in a cold sweat, shrieking at his demons.

Jamie rubbed a hand over his face, trying to think. If Crusoe and Hanks didn’t already know he was gone, they’d notice in the next few seconds.

“Rats in the feed,” he shouted up. “I killed one.” It was a feeble story; there were always rats in the feed, and no one would have stirred a finger to investigate their noises in the dead of night, let alone hunt them in the dark.

Hanks made a sound of disgust, rustling his bedclothes. “The Scotchman’s buggering the horses again,” he said conversationally to Crusoe, though clearly speaking loud enough to be heard below. “Ought to speak to his lordship about it.”

Crusoe grunted angrily. “Well, whatever the fuck you’re doin’, MacKenzie, be quiet about it!” he shouted, and flung himself over on his pallet in a flurry of bother.

Jamie’s heart was pounding again, with annoyed agitation. He reached for the young woman—­no auld crone squealed like that—­but slowly this time, and she made no demur when he took her by the arm. He led her down the stone-­flagged aisle between the stalls and outside, shoving the sliding door to behind them with a rumble.

It was cold enough out to make him gasp, an icy wind flattening his shirt to his body and stealing his breath. The moon was obscured by racing cloud, but enough glow came from the sky for him to make out the identity of his intruder.

“What the devil d’ye want?” he snapped. “And how did ye ken where I was?” It had dawned on him that she hadn’t just stumbled over him in the hay, for why would a lady’s maid be poking about the stables at night? She’d come looking for him.

Betty lifted her chin.

“There’s a man what wants to talk to you. He sent me to say. And I saw you come down from the loft.”

That last sentence floated in the air between them, charged like a Leyden jar. Touch it, and there’d be a spark that would stand his hair on end. Christ. Did she have any notion what it was he’d been doing?

He caught the hint of a smirk on her face before a cloud shadow obscured it, and his ears went suddenly hot with rising blood.

“What man?” he said. “Where?”

“An Irishman,” she said. “But a gentleman. He says to tell you the green branch will flower. And to meet him on the fells, where the old shepherd’s hut is.”

The shock of it nearly made him forget the cold, though the wind was ripping through the linen of his shirt and he was shivering so hard that he found it hard to speak without his voice shaking. And that wouldn’t do.

“I’ve nothing to do wi’ any Irishmen,” he snapped. “And if he comes back, ye may tell him so.” He put a hand on the door, turning to go in. “I’m going to my bed. Good night to ye.”

A light hand ran down his back and stopped just above his buttocks. He could feel the hair there bristle like a badger’s, and not from the cold.

“Your bed’ll be cold as death by now.” She’d stepped close; he could feel the slight warmth of her body behind him, the heat of her breath through his shirt. And she still had her hand on him. Lower now. “Mine’s a good deal warmer.”

Holy Lord. Arse clenched, he moved deliberately away from her and pushed the door open.

“Good night,” he said, without turning round, and stepped into the rustling, inquisitive dark of the stable. He saw her for an instant as he turned to shut the door, caught in the flickering moonlight, her eyes narrowed like an angry cat’s.

p[

He made no effort to be quiet, climbing the ladder back to the loft. Hanks and Crusoe were pointedly silent, though he thought neither one was asleep. God knew what they’d say about tonight’s incident, but he wasn’t disposed to be worrit over that pair. He’d enough else to think on.

Betty, for one. For if anyone on Helwater estate knew his great secret, it was she. Betty had been Geneva Dunsany’s lady’s maid before becoming maid to her sister after Geneva’s death. How much of a confidante had she been, though?

He could still feel the pressure of her hand on his backside and squirmed his arse irritably into his pallet, the straw under his blanket poking him. Damn the woman. She’d given him an eye when he’d first come to Helwater from Ardsmuir prison three years before, a paroled Jacobite traitor, but a lady’s maid had little to do with a groom, and it was easy enough not to see her long-­eyed glances when she came to tell him that Lady Geneva wanted her horse. Not so easy to avoid Lady Geneva.

He grimaced in the dark at thought of Geneva. He wasn’t feeling charitable at the moment but crossed himself nonetheless and said a brief prayer for the repose of her soul, as he did whenever she came into his mind. He owed her that much, poor lass, no matter what she’d done to him.

But why the devil was Betty playing the loon now? Geneva had been dead more than two years, and Betty herself had come back to Helwater soon after her mistress’s death in childbirth. She’d not spoken a word to him in the last six months; why go to the risk of coming to the stable at night—­and, come to that, what had the silly wee bitch intended? Climbing the creaking ladder and sliding into his bed unannounced, with Hanks and Crusoe curled under their blankets six feet away, their great ears flapping? Sneaking him into the servants’ attic?

She couldn’t have meant to wait below for him; she hadn’t known he’d come down. For that matter . . . she said she’d seen him descend the ladder, but she hadn’t come to him then. Why not?

The logical answer presented itself, with a small jolt to the pit of his stomach. She hadn’t been looking for him at all.

He sat bolt upright before the train of his thought had entirely finished, his body grasping the point at once. She’d come to meet someone else, and that meeting had been interrupted by his own inopportune appearance.

An intruder couldn’t have hidden in an occupied stall or anywhere else . . . save the vacant loose box near the door.

And that’s why she woke me, he thought, hands clenching on the blanket. She had to draw me away, so the fellow could get out. Christ, he was in there with me! His skin prickled with mingled embarrassment and fury. The notion that . . . could it be possible . . . surely he would have sensed someone . . . ?

But he wouldn’t. He’d been so desperate to find solitude in which to reach Claire for that one necessary moment that he wouldn’t have noticed a bear lurking in the shadows, provided it hadn’t tried to interrupt him.

One of the cocks in the hen coop crowed, two more on its heels. A sleepy “Oh, fuuuck” came from a nearby pallet. A loud rustle of someone sitting up, and the hawking and snorting started. Hanks smoked heavily—­when he could afford it—­and took a good quarter hour to start breathing in the morning.

Jamie breathed deep himself, thinking. Then flung back his blanket and rose to meet what was likely to be an interesting day.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 183 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(104)

4 Star

(40)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(14)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 184 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 4, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    excited

    I just love all of Diana Gabaldon's books. As a fan I would recommend them to everyone. can't wait to read the next!!!!!

    13 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 3, 2011

    A story you can lose yourself in time with!

    If you are a fan of the Outlander series, this is a must read. Set during the period that Jamie Fraser and his wife are seperated by time, it is a closer look at his relationship with Lord John. They become embroiled in more schemes and intrigue, which leads to some interesting action scenes as well, much to the reader's entertainment. If you have not read any of the books in either series, it is still an interesting, stand alone story. But you will be hooked, once you read it!

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 12, 2011

    Diana Gabaldon is increadible

    I have read just about every book she has written and have not yet found one I did not like! You will not be dissapointed in this novel

    10 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 20, 2011

    Very Very Good Book

    I Liked this book alot.. though i did not find it as exciting as the OUTLANDER series.. I think i am just in love with the whole Jamie and Claire thing.. I love it when both characters are in the book.. but this book helped fill in a time gap in the series and for that reason alone I love it.. it is very much worth reading..

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2011

    Supurb!

    Gabaldon continues to weave a fabulous tale that captivates the reader totally!!

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    Great historical fiction-fans of Outlander series must read!

    I enjoyed this novel much more than previous Lord John books. It connects into the Outlander series and fills in gaps. Don't miss this one.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2011

    How?

    How does a person get to read this novel when it isn't available to the public yet? Let alone be able to review it??

    6 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2012

    Highly recommend. If you haven't read a Diana Gabaldon book, you are missing out on some GREAT Wit, history and romance.. add a little magic.. and its perfect!!

    Wonderful book.. well written, fantastic characters and wonderful wit. This book can stand alone.. but.. if you have not read the Outlander series and the Lord John series.. you may not appreciate the book as much. So.. start from book one.. OUTLANDER.. and enjoy the RIDE!!!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    Diana always entertains!

    Claire was gone 20 years and we knew she went to school, raised her daughter and mourned Jamie. Now we find out what our Jamie was doing. Loved Scottish Prisoner.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 29, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Not bad

    I am a big big fan of the Outlander series, and I think that is why I didn't enjoy this book as much as I probably should have. The storyline and writing in this book are really good, but I kept feeling that something was missing while reading. In the Outlander series, the books center around Jamie and Claire, and I think that is what I was missing in "The Scottish Prisoner." I found it easy to put this book down and I wasn't in a rush to finish through it. I wasn't able to really get into this book, and the only parts I really cared about were the small references to Claire, and the time Jamie got to spend with Willie. I love Jamie Fraser, but he just isn't the same without Claire with him, and for me it was very evident in this book.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    the scottish prisoner

    What a great read.I am never dissappointed when I. Read Diana Gabaldon books. I. can't wait for the next outlander book.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    Great story

    A great read from a master storyteller! Looking forward to the new Outlander book. Hopefully it will be coming soon!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2011

    Another amazing read!

    A must read for all Gabaldon fans

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2011

    Can not wait..

    I truly miss these characters. These books are amazing. So full of history love and humor.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    Fantastic !!!

    Diana never lets me down

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2011

    A wonderful addition.

    This was a wonderful addition to Diana's Outlander series. I love her writing style and this book did not disappoint. I am eagerly awaiting "My Hearts Own Blood" in 2012.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2011

    Great fun and a good addition to the series.

    I loved it!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2012

    Needs more Lord John

    This is really a story to fill in the gaps of the Outlander series. Because of this, it rambles a bit, and the ending is too ambiguous, soft. I would have preferred a story about Lord John, since this was called a Lord John novel. That said, it was fun to read more about John and Jamie working through their baggage during the Hellwater period. The positives were: 1. No Claire, which is great for me, as she's my least favorite character of Gabaldon's. Sorry, but C gets on my nerves. 2. It's set in the UK, so no grappling with slavery or race, which she always mangles.

    My favorite character is Lord John, and some details feel like she's ret-conning him as less kind than established. I had hoped that this series would see him break out of his thankless duty of celibately reflecting the glow of J & C. Not quite. At least he's finally getting some, even if it's not a partner. I'd love to see LJ treated as a good person while enjoying his sexuality. This is the closest the author's gotten, but the possible retcon is troubling.

    2 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2012

    Well done!

    This piece flows well, fits in with the rest of the plot lines and characters, and keeps you mentally prepared for when the next book in the Outlander series comes out. Diana doesn't disappoint! Fans will enjoy this immensly.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    This is the most boring book I have ever read! In fact, I couldn

    This is the most boring book I have ever read! In fact, I couldn't even get half way through it. What a disappointment, after the Outlander series.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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