The Sleepy Little Alphabet: A Bedtime Story from Alphabet Town
  • The Sleepy Little Alphabet: A Bedtime Story from Alphabet Town
  • The Sleepy Little Alphabet: A Bedtime Story from Alphabet Town

The Sleepy Little Alphabet: A Bedtime Story from Alphabet Town

4.7 3
by Judy Sierra, Melissa Sweet
     
 

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A fun read-aloud board book for toddlers just learning their ABCs.
 
Judy Sierra’s rollicking alphabet story features the lowercase letters of the alphabet. Like children, they have a trunkful of tricks for putting off bedtime. But ultimately their moms and dads (the capital letters) succeed in tucking them in with a good-night kiss.

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Overview

A fun read-aloud board book for toddlers just learning their ABCs.
 
Judy Sierra’s rollicking alphabet story features the lowercase letters of the alphabet. Like children, they have a trunkful of tricks for putting off bedtime. But ultimately their moms and dads (the capital letters) succeed in tucking them in with a good-night kiss. Melissa Sweet’s watercolor, pencil, and collage illustrations enliven these little letters with animated expressions, and Judy Sierra’s brief rhyming story begs repeat readings at bedtime.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Sierra and Sweet (Schoolyard Rhymes) collaborate on an alphabet rhyme about rambunctious lower-case letters who won't go to bed ("h tries standing on her head./ i and j jump on the bed"). Bookstore shelves may be crowded with abecedarian offerings, but the bounce of Sierra's meter, the time-for-bed theme and Sweet's offhand pencil and watercolor drawings make the story feel fresh. Throughout, Sierra inserts vocabulary items that incorporate the letters ("u takes off his underwear") while Sweet provides the laughs (u's gleeful bucktoothed grin as he tosses a pair of outsize polka-dot bloomers in the air). The adults are pictured as capital letters, as they attempt to shepherd their children through their nightly routines. Sweet fills each room with alphabetically appropriate accessories: the X and Y family has a framed yo-yo championship award, while the Ts have a telephone, a tortoise and a tea set. Textiles, loose-leaf binder paper and newsprint are used judiciously for visual interest, while the letters' goggle eyes, toothy smiles and emotive expressions all spell F-U-N. Ages 2-6. (June)

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Children's Literature - Gwynne Spencer
Every kid in the whole world will tell you that Capital Letters are the most important because they are the "grownup" letters. That is probably why kindergarteners persist in printing in all caps to start with. In this likable little lullaby book, the Grownup Letters are trying to get their rambunctious offspring into bed. This delightful book would be greatly loved in every preschool classroom or kindergarten as a pre-naptime read-aloud. Judy Sierra's sparse, tight rhyme combines with stunningly childlike illustrations by Melissa Sweet. Check out her website at www.melissasweet.net where you will find a terrific "concentration" game kids will love. Sweet's illustrations personify each "little letter" as the child of its "big daddy or momma" letter most charmingly. On the endplates, the letters, big and little, are easily identified as belonging to each other by color, composition, texture, all except the X, which I suppose will always be a bit of an odd one. The sense of aliveness of the letters permeates the pages, which are solid color on the left, scene-filled on the right, making this a perfect beginning-to-read title for those early readers who need big type on an uncluttered background. It is inherently charming to see adjacent letters of the alphabet enjoying their lives together, something I never thought of, but of course it makes sense. They spend so much time together, you know. Each rollicking picture includes objects related by their beginning letter to at least one of the letters in the scene; undoubtedly the favorite page will be "u" taking off his underwear. Eventually all the little letters successfully settle down to sleep but the reader feels a nagging urge to readit again, just for fun. What a great addition to the alphabet book genre! At www.judysierra.net you will find a short educational guide to The Sleepy Little Alphabet as well as her other wildly popular picture books. Reviewer: Gwynne Spencer
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

In this winning alphabet-cum-bedtime book, capital-letter parents gradually tuck their lowercase children in for the night. Sierra uses a number of poetic tools as she tears her way through the alphabet (never once mentioning a xylophone) while multimedia elements-a notebook-paper cloud here, a fabric-clothed letter there-pepper the pen-and-pencil-outlined watercolor illustrations. Sweet extrapolates the effect of Sierra's alliterative text with perfectly timed, amusing details (it really wouldn't be an alphabet book without that xylophone, would it?). Parents and children, librarians, teachers, and students will pore over this one again and again.-Bethany Isaacson, Wheaton Regional Library, Silver Spring, MD

Kirkus Reviews
Sierra's reliably commendable verse teams with quirky illustrations from Sweet to produce an alphabet-bedtime hybrid with plenty of appeal for families. Restless lower-case children resist bedtime in assorted realistic, predictable ways: "h tries standing on her head. / i and j jump on the bed." The author knows her preschool audience and produces potty chairs and underwear for dependable giggles. The illustrator's blocky letters sport pop-eyes and toothy grins. She intersperses plenty of additional objects beginning with the letters featured on each pastel spread, providing parents and kids with opportunities to linger and learn. By letters v and w, the transition from pre-bedtime chaos to irrefutable tiredness is complete, and the final spread depicts a veritable dormitory of typographic drowsing. Capital! (Picture book. 2-6)
From the Publisher
Starred Review, The Horn Book Magazine, July & August 2009:
“Using humor perfectly tuned for the two- to five-year-old audience, Sierra and Sweet’s alphabet book will capture the attention of the younger end . . . as well as the older.’”

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375840029
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
06/09/2009
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
131,440
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Starred Review, The Horn Book Magazine, July & August 2009:
“Using humor perfectly tuned for the two- to five-year-old audience, Sierra and Sweet’s alphabet book will capture the attention of the younger end . . . as well as the older.’”

Meet the Author

Judy Sierra’s knack at telling stories in rhyme is impressively demonstrated in her E. B.White Read-Aloud Award winner, Wild About Books; in Born to Read; and in Thelonius Monster’s Sky-High Fly Pie. She lives in Eugene, Oregon.

Melissa Sweet is the illustrator of many acclaimed children’s books, including her collaboration with Judy Sierra on Schoolyard Rhymes. She is also the author and illustrator of Carmine: A Little More Red. She lives in Rockport, Maine.

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The Sleepy Little Alphabet: A Bedtime Story from Alphabet Town 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fun bedtime read sure to leave your child with pleasant dreams!
shamola More than 1 year ago
The book is very educational and fun for the children to use to learn the letters of the alphabet. The child enjoys having the book read to him as a bedtime story and is now starting to recognize the letter in the book - as he is in pre-school now. It will be very helpful for his later work in school. The book is a great gift to get for children ages 3-5 years old.
Heather-H More than 1 year ago
Adorable! A great way to teach the letters at bedtime!