Whatever Happened to Sunday Dinner?: A Year of Italian Menus with 250 Recipes That Celebrate Family

( 2 )

Overview

The family that eats together stays together! That's what Lisa Caponigri believes, and she created Whatever Happened to Sunday Dinner? to give real families recipes they can easily cook and enjoy together. Caponigri has devised 52 delicious Italian menus--one for each Sunday of the year--that feature all the favorites, including classics like crostini, lasagne, polenta, stuffed peppers, veal piccata, risotto alla Milanese, and ricotta pie. There are also many surprises like Woodman's pasta and Italian french ...
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Overview

The family that eats together stays together! That's what Lisa Caponigri believes, and she created Whatever Happened to Sunday Dinner? to give real families recipes they can easily cook and enjoy together. Caponigri has devised 52 delicious Italian menus--one for each Sunday of the year--that feature all the favorites, including classics like crostini, lasagne, polenta, stuffed peppers, veal piccata, risotto alla Milanese, and ricotta pie. There are also many surprises like Woodman's pasta and Italian french fries--and traditional, treasured dishes from her own family's kitchen, such as Nana's Strufoli and Grandma Caponigri's Ragu Sauce.
 
Beautifully photographed by Guy Ambrosino, Whatever Happened to Sunday Dinner? showcases food styling by former Gourmet magazine editor Kate Winslow.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"[A] delightful guide to Italian family dining.... well-written and beautifully presented.... Whatever Happened to Sunday Dinner? will give you all the inspiration and practical information you need to make those family meals memorable and delicious." --The Wall Street Journal

"A good cookbook to gather a hungry crowd and leave them happily satiated."--Kirkus Reviews

 

Kirkus Reviews
Caponigri shares her family's tradition of Sunday dinners. "Sunday was for gathering, preparing, cooking, eating, sharing, talking, laughing…a time to disconnect from the rest of the world and reconnect with family and friends," writes the author. In that spirit, she organizes her debut cookbook into "52 Sunday dinner menus in the Italian tradition." The thematic menus include: antipasto (usually a crostini to pass at the table), a primo (first course), a secondo (main course) served with a single contorno (side dish) and dessert. While some of the recipes are standard Italian fare (veal piccata, spinach lasagna, stuffed mushrooms), others are less common but intriguing (prosciutto soufflé, veal breast stuffed with raisins and pine nuts, hazelnut truffle pie). These are not last-minute items; Caponigri feels preparation should involve a noisy kitchen full of people. She also highlights recipes that are child-friendly to prepare and serve. Caponigri suggests five ways to incorporate Sunday dinners into your routine: Make them a priority, plan ahead, decide the menu and assign the chores together, keep the menu simple, let go and have fun. The book is flavored with Italian aphorisms, informative menu introductions and Caponigri's family history. Guy Ambrosino provides the enticing photographs, with food styling by former Gourmet editor Kate Winslow. A good cookbook to gather a hungry crowd and leave them happily satiated.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402784828
  • Publisher: Sterling Epicure
  • Publication date: 4/3/2012
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 328,299
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

When she was a young girl, Lisa Caponigri regularly traveled on extended research trips to Italy with her father, an internationally known professor of Italian philosophy. Then, on school vacations Caponigri's Sicilian grandmother invited her to spend time at her home, and under her grandmother's watchful eye Lisa mastered Italian home cooking. Later in life, Lisa moved to Italy to raise her family and continued to study Italian cuisine. Lisa now resides in South Bend, Indiana and dedicates herself to spreading the gospel of Italian cooking in America.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    From one who never cooks....

    I love this book mainly for its' photos and history of the menus. While I have been able to make some of the simple recipes, I am not much of a cook and bought the book in an attempt to start cooking with my family more. Well,it did get me on that track, but it has also taught me so much about the origins of some Italian recipes, and the fun that cooking can be!

    I have bought numerous copies and given them to many of my friends, all of whom love it (and I must say are better cooks than I am!). The menus make it easy to plan an evening at home with their children, and at the end of the meal, you can talk about the history of the dishes you are eating too!

    All Hail Sunday Dinner! :-)

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 26, 2012

    Highly recommend.

    Beautiful book. Purchased as a gift for a friend who continues to keep the tradition alive. Now I want one for myself.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 28, 2010

    A User Friendly Cook Book for the Whole Family!

    I enjoy cooking, but am not a gourmet cook. I have tried, (unsuccesfully)to keep it simple and healthy, but my children would rebel at my paltry attempts. Cook books for me have long been thick, intimidating tomes. When my Mom gave me this cook book as a gift, I thought it would be one more cook book collecting dust. On the flight home, I started looking at the beautiful pictures, reading this book more like a novel, and was inspired! I love Italian food and the fact that this book also encourages my children to get involved in the cooking process was awesome. As a single Dad, dinner can be a lazy microwave meal or fish sticks, or the old standby, PB&J. But, I have been feeling guilty about the nutrition that my children have been getting. Sweet cereal at breakfast, fast food for lunch... well, you get the idea.

    I remember when growing up that we always had dinner as a family. These days my son is playing video games, my daughter is at her girlfriend's house, the toddler is mesmerized in front of the T.V. I now set aside at least one night a week where we all cook and eat dinner together. Most surprising, the kids actually look forward to it! (Okay, so there was that flour throwing incident...!) Bottom line, if you are as nostalgic as I am at the thought of your Grandmother standing at the front door and ringing the bell for dinner, this cook book is for you! As they say in Italian, "Buon Appetito!"

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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