Wicked Irish for the Traveler

Wicked Irish for the Traveler

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by Howard Tomb, Jared Lee
     
 

Master the gift of gab with the phrase book that makes Erin go ha!

From Dublin on Five Pints an Hour to Genuflection for Beginners, Wicked Irish helps visitors negotiate the nuances of a country where even trees are considered Protestant or Catholic. Learn to flatter customs agents: "'Tis a grand machine you have there, officer!"

Overview

Master the gift of gab with the phrase book that makes Erin go ha!

From Dublin on Five Pints an Hour to Genuflection for Beginners, Wicked Irish helps visitors negotiate the nuances of a country where even trees are considered Protestant or Catholic. Learn to flatter customs agents: "'Tis a grand machine you have there, officer!" Politely decline the heavy Irish breakfast: "I've given up pig entrails/congealed blood for Lent." Show appreciation for fine whiskey: "ACK ACK! Mother Mary! That goes down the nun's knickers!" There's even a special section just for golfers: "Should I replace divots in consecrated ground? Am I entitled to relief from this dolmen/ewe/leprechaun? Shite! I don't usually lose a putt in the wind."

Wicked Irish is instant gift of gab, and soon you'll be toasting newfound friends, strangers, barmaids, and even stray dogs with confidence.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761113553
Publisher:
Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
07/28/1999
Edition description:
MINIATURE
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
3.96(w) x 5.98(h) x 0.15(d)

Read an Excerpt

DRIVING TIPS

Safe driving depends on good habits and instincts, since you don't have time to think in emergencies. That's why life is so dangerous on the left side of the road: the habits you've nurtured for as long as long as you've been driving are suddenly wrong. A simple right turn could be murder.

Irish cars have standard transmissions, so you have to drive and shift on the left. Most roads feature potholes and stone walls (known as "ditches" or "hedges"), not shoulders. Where you'd expect an intersection you'll find a roundabout. The urge to drink can be powerful (What's an Irish vacation without alcohol, after all?), but impaired drivers go home in a box.

DO NOT

* Drive at night

* Drink and drive

* Attempt to become airborne on bumpy roads

* Transport livestock without permission

DO

* Grab every last scrap of insurance

* Rent the largest car you can find to gain a Newtonian advantage in a head-on collision

* Ask the rental agent for religious statuary

* Consider a bus tour

Excerpted from Wicked Irish. Copyright

Meet the Author

Howard Tomb is the author of the Wicked Travel books. He also writes for the Sunday Travel Section of the New York Times.

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Wicked Irish for the Traveler 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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dobetter More than 1 year ago
It contained all the phrases the teachers wouldn't let me say in school.