The Wolving Time

The Wolving Time

5.0 5
by Patrick Jennings
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A family of werewolves faces the human evil of persecution in this tense and spellbinding novel from one of Scholastic Press' favorite authors.

Laszlo Emberek is caught between two worlds: the bucolic life of a shepherd, tending his family's small flock of sheep with his beloved dog, Gizi, and the secret life of his parents, who can "change" into wolves at will.

Overview

A family of werewolves faces the human evil of persecution in this tense and spellbinding novel from one of Scholastic Press' favorite authors.

Laszlo Emberek is caught between two worlds: the bucolic life of a shepherd, tending his family's small flock of sheep with his beloved dog, Gizi, and the secret life of his parents, who can "change" into wolves at will. 13-yr-old Laszlo knows his change will come soon. But when his family's secret is discovered by a village girl -- a ward of the evil and corrupt priest, no less -- Laszlo must decide how he wants to live. Can he trust himself to remain compassionately human as other, wilder instincts overcome him? And are humans truly less dangerous than the wolves they hate with such passion?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
PW's starred review called this a "gripping tale of a family that can turn into wolves, set in 16th-century France." Ages 10-14. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Laszlo has the basic things any adolescent boy could want: beautiful pastures for his sheep, two loving parents, and the chance to become a werewolf someday. His world is full of conflict, though; the town his family lives near dislikes werewolves (which his parents already are). Despite admonitions from a corrupt town priest, Laszlo chooses to accept his family's gift when his own "wolving time" arrives. He is drawn to the human world because of a girl his age, Muno, but the animal sense he gains reveals to him the cruel side of men. Glimpsing both the human and the animal world but not totally understanding either, he is called to be brave beyond measure. Laszlo captivates and inspires readers. The story offers fantasy that stirs one's imagination to take in this supernatural crisis, yet the reader walks in the unmistakably adolescent shoes of a human boy. Magic aside, the book's lessons have direct applicability. Many a teenager is torn between two "worlds" (whether that means between growing up and not, between groups of friends, or otherwise). Laszlo's tale may well parallel theirs. He might inspire anyone to stand on his own four paws and seize the day. 2003, Scholastic Press, Ages 12 up.
—Katie Schooler
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Near the end of the 16th century, Laszlo Emberek, 13, leads a seemingly idyllic life as a poor shepherd to his family's tiny flock in the French Pyrenees-at least until a wolf appears nearby. He whistles to signal his mother, who comes running, only to throw off her clothes, change into a wolf, and go romping off into the distance. That's right-Jennings spins this interesting historical yarn about a family of werewolves who make their living herding sheep. This tale is no comedy, though, but rather a compelling, thoughtful story. When Laszlo discovers that Muno, an orphaned Basque girl whose parents were executed as witches, has witnessed his mother's change, he worries that she won't keep the family's secret. Cultural, historical, and geographic details make for interesting reading. Also compelling is Laszlo's desire to come of age, to join his parents in making the change. His first journey to the village alone, his first change into a wolf, and his first experience of caring about another young person are all well rendered. Readers are likely to identify with the werewolf metaphor, which evokes the physical and emotional changes that adolescents experience. The exciting climax sees justice served, with Laszlo realizing the preciousness of life and his family secure with hopes for a new and safer life in a new village.-Joel Shoemaker, Southeast Junior High School, Iowa City, IA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Set in a medieval French village, this owes more to the historical werewolf mythology than pop culture. Laszlo's family members are shepherds and werewolves (a contradiction that Jennings makes believable). The Embereks are, in fact, kinder, gentler, and better educated than the villagers they live among. A pitiable girl, who is victimized and enslaved by the village priest who condemned her parents as witches, observes Laszlo's mother change into a wolf. Subsequently, under torture, the girl denounces the werewolf family. The Embereks change into wolves to escape prison, taking the girl with them and heading for a refuge offered by a kind man for whom they have done a good turn. Jennings uses his setting well to limn the double life of the family against the superstitions and harsh social and religious constraints of the time. The stew of adolescent emotions, as Laszlo reaches the age when he can transform at will into a wolf, is made more complex by the terrifyingly beautiful and dangerous world he has entered. Not as action-packed as readers might like, but layered and thought-provoking. (Fiction. 12-14)
From the Publisher
School Library Journal
(January 1, 2004; 0-439-39555-0)

Gr 5-8-Near the end of the 16th century, Laszlo Emberek, 13, leads a seemingly idyllic life as a poor shepherd to his family's tiny flock in the French Pyrenees-at least until a wolf appears nearby. He whistles to signal his mother, who comes running, only to throw off her clothes, change into a wolf, and go romping off into the distance. That's right-Jennings spins this interesting historical yarn about a family of werewolves who make their living herding sheep. This tale is no comedy, though, but rather a compelling, thoughtful story. When Laszlo discovers that Muno, an orphaned Basque girl whose parents were executed as witches, has witnessed his mother's change, he worries that she won't keep the family's secret. Cultural, historical, and geographic details make for interesting reading. Also compelling is Laszlo's desire to come of age, to join his parents in making the change. His first journey to the village alone, his first change into a wolf, and his first experience of caring about another young person are all well rendered. Readers are likely to identify with the werewolf metaphor, which evokes the physical and emotional changes that adolescents experience. The exciting climax sees justice served, with Laszlo realizing the preciousness of life and his family secure with hopes for a new and safer life in a new village.-Joel Shoemaker, Southeast Junior High School, Iowa City, IA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Publishers Weekly
(December 1, 2003; STARRED)

Jennings (Faith and the Electric Dogs; The Beastly Arms) demonstrates a superb diversity of style and characterization with this gripping tale of a family that can turn into wolves, set in 16th-century France. By choosing this era, the author probes the tenets of Christianity and the corruption of the church at a time when purported witches were burned at the stake. Born into a long line of shepherds, 13-year-old Lazlo lives with his family off by themselves, isolated from the townspeople, due to their foreign accent and ways. His mother and father possess an advantage in their vocation: they can transform into "loup-garou" (what the French called werewolves) to negotiate with wolves in the neighboring pack and protect their flock. When Muno, an orphan girl Lazlo's age, witnesses his mother's transformation while running away from her warden-the town's evil priest-Lazlo realizes that she knows the truth. Yet his desire for a friend impels him to conceal from his parents both Muno's knowledge of their secret and the growing hostility in the village toward them. Taking on the mindset of his characters, Jennings appeals to readers' senses, especially as Lazlo finally chooses to change into a wolf and "the softly fragrant forest... was now a place noisier and smellier than the village square." In contrast to the kindness and integrity of the natural wolves, the "loup-garou" and society's other outcasts, the priest and townspeople emerge as the bestial creatures. This page-turner delivers a fascinating commentary on what constitutes true goodness. Ages 12-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Voice of Youth Advocates
(December 1, 2003; 0-439-39555-0)

Laszlo's family members are shepherds in sixteenth-century France, living outside the town walls and attending town functions and church infrequently. Another trait that sets his family apart is their ability to change into wolves. Laszlo meets Muno, the priest's charge, as she is running away and witnesses Laszlo's mother changing. Laszlo is afraid that she will tell and the priest will persecute them, but as time passes and Muno does not, he becomes more afraid for the fate he realizes she will suffer living with the priest. In an exciting scene, the family escapes from the dungeons along with Muno and flees to the next township, but no

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439395564
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
05/01/2005
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Patrick Jennings was born in Crown Point, Indiana in 1962; He graduated from Arizona State University in 1985 with a bachelor of fine arts. He has taught preschool and English as a Second/Other Language to adults. In 1993 he lived in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico where he taught English as a Foreign Language to students, ranging in age from preschoolers to adults. Afterwards Patrick moved to Bisbee, AZ where he worked afternoons in the library, dedicating the rest of his working time to writing and doing activities (readings, storytimes, art activities) with children. One of his goals in visiting schools is to help children realize the value of their education and creative potential. His daughter, Odette, was born in April 1999, and he has happily been dividing his time between caring for her and writing.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Wolving Time 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book with all my heart. I have read 400 page books that weren't as interesting as this book was. I couldn't put it down. I am a wolf lover and in so I have done a lot of research on them and this book with its knowlegde of them stoll my heart away with its amazing story. I recomend this book to anyone, even if they're not a wolf lover. When I reached the end of the book, I didn't want it to end. Many, many kudos to Patrick Jennings the writer of this book. It was marvelous.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book and read it in one day. Having studied the dryer, more statistical side of werewolf history in ancient Europe, it was fun to see it transformed into a story with characters you can identify with. It looks like Jennings did a good job of studying the harsh and gritty life of the peasants and shepherds, because reading the book you really do feel transported into another time. Overall, a very exciting book which should be fun for readers of all ages and a unique and creative presentation of shapeshifting.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a really good book, but what I am always wondering is: if the people the priest tortured really were witches, how come the priest didn't realize that they would just escape like Laszlo's family did?
Guest More than 1 year ago
excellent writing!!!! I recommend this for older grades though. There is some sexual content.