Yankee Don't Go Home!: Mexican Nationalism, American Business Culture, and the Shaping of Modern Mexico, 1920-1950 / Edition 1

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Overview

Moreno describes how Mexico's industrial capitalism between 1920 and 1950 shaped the country's national identity, contributed to Mexico's emergence as a modern nation-state, and transformed U.S.-Mexican relations. The study is as much of American diplomacy and U.S. corporate culture—and the encounter between American and Mexican values, beliefs, and practices—as it is of Mexican history.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An interesting analysis of Mexico's material progress. . . . [The] research is very good and [the] analysis . . . offers important insights. . . . The selective use of rural memories for an urbanizing country is path breaking."
The Americas

"New and refreshing. . . . An excellent example of how a cultural perspective can provide rich insights into business history. . . . Will inspire new research."
Business History Review

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Julio Moreno is assistant professor of history at the University of San Francisco.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction 1
1 Liberalism, the State, and Modern Industrial Capitalism in Postrevolutionary Mexico 16
2 Spreading the American Dream: Information, Technology, and World War II 45
3 Prophets of Capitalism: The Growth of Advertising as a Profession and the Making of Modern Mexico 82
4 Advertising National Identity and Globalization in the Reconstruction of Modern Mexico 112
5 J. Walter Thompson and the Negotiation of Mexican and American Values 152
6 In Search of Markets, Diplomacy, and Consumers: Sears as a Commercial Diplomat in Mexico 172
7 Industrial Capitalism, Antimodernism, and Consumer Culture in 1940s Mexico 207
Conclusion 229
Notes 235
Bibliography 283
Index 309
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2004

    Brilliant

    Moreno, so to speak, captures the true essence of the Mexican identity in this wonderfully written exploration into the shaping of the tri-color. The book leaves me yearning for yet another book by the professor, I can only hope this time he tackles another interesting subject, such as the social, political and economic history of Peru.

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