Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions)

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions)

by Lewis Carroll

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Overview

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions) by Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll's novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (first published in 1865 and 1871, respectively) have entertained readers young and old for more than a century. Their magical worlds, amusing characters, clever dialogue, and playfully logical illogic epitomize the wit and whimsy of Carroll's writing. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland transports you down the rabbit-hole into a wondrous realm that is home to a White Rabbit, a March Hare, a Mad Hatter, a tea-drinking Dormouse, a grinning Cheshire-Cat, the Queen of Hearts and her playing-card retainers, and all manner of marvelous creatures. Through the Looking-Glass is your passport to a topsy-turvy world on the other side of the mirror, where you have to run fast just to stay in place, memory works backwards, and it is possible to believe as many as six impossible things before breakfast. Both stories feature the colored classic illustrations of John Tenniel. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass is one of Barnes & Noble's Collectible Editions classics. Each volume features authoritative texts by the world's greatest authors in an exquisitely designed foil-stamped binding, with distinctive colored edging and an attractive ribbon bookmark. Decorative, durable, and collectible, these books offer hours of pleasure to readers young and old and are an indispensable cornerstone for any home library.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781435159549
Publisher: Barnes & Noble
Publication date: 03/27/2015
Series: Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions Series
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 9,314
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 10 - 14 Years

About the Author

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was a man of diverse interests - in mathematics, logic, photgraphy, art, theater, religion, medicine, and science. He was happiest in the company of children for whom he created puzzles, clever games, and charming letters.

As all Carroll admirers know, his book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), became an immediate success and has since been translated into more than eighty languages. The equally popular sequel Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, was published in 1872.

The Alice books are but one example of his wide ranging authorship. The Hunting of the Snark, a classic nonsense epic (1876) and Euclid and His Modern Rivals, a rare example of humorous work concerning mathematics, still entice and intrigue today's students. Sylvie and Bruno, published toward the end of his life contains startling ideas including an 1889 description of weightlessness.

The humor, sparkling wit and genius of this Victorian Englishman have lasted for more than a century. His books are among the most quoted works in the English language, and his influence (with that of his illustrator, Sir John Tenniel) can be seen everywhere, from the world of advertising to that of atomic physics.

Date of Birth:

January 27, 1832

Date of Death:

January 14, 1898

Place of Birth:

Daresbury, Cheshire, England

Place of Death:

Guildford, Surrey, England

Education:

Richmond School, Christ Church College, Oxford University, B.A., 1854; M.A., 1857

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER I

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE

ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do. Once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it - "And what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations?"

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid) whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! oh dear! I shall be too late!" (When she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural.) But when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat pocket, and looked at it and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat pocket or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down - so suddenly, that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything. Then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and bookshelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labeled "ORANGE MARMALADE," but to her great disappointment it was empty. She did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

"Well!" thought Alice to herself, "after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling downstairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!" (Which was very likely true.)Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? "I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?" she said aloud. "I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think." (For, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over.) "Yes, that's about the right distance. But then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?" (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice, grand words to say.)

Presently she began again. "I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think" - (she was rather glad there was no one listening this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) - "but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know - please, ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?" (and she tried to curtsy as she spoke - fancy curtsying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) "And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere."

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!" (Dinah was the cat.) "I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. - Dinah, my dear, I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. - But do cats eat bats, I wonder?" And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, "Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?" and sometimes, "Do bats eat cats?" for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her very earnestly, "Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?" when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment. She looked up, but it was all dark overhead. Before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost. Away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, "Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!" She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

Customer Reviews

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was perfect for my best friend's baby shower. She has been a lifelong fan of Alice In Wonderland, and I wanted to get her a beautiful copy that she can read to her daughter and that she can read on her own one day when she grows up as her first Alice book. For less than ten dollars, it was such a great buy and got a wonderful reaction when she opened it. It being a beautiful pink hardcover with illustrations and silver edges and a ribbon bookmark, it looked like I spent way more than I did. Couldn't be more happy!
rgreer77 More than 1 year ago
Barnes and Noble, please stop putting new covers on the leatherbound classics that you have already released. It is a waste since there are so many other books you could release in this form. Here are some titles I would love to see. The Brothers Karamazov The Lord of the Rings The Hobbit Middlemarch 1984 and Animal Farm The Chronicles of Prydain
Featherson More than 1 year ago
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland--or simply, Alice in Wonderland, is universally acknowledged to be of a children's classic--perhaps the first in England. Barnes and Noble collectible editions have printed several Alice's Adventures in Wonderland leather bound editions, and this edition is most suited for young children. Unlike the other larger editions, this is sized to fit with the other small and childish classics, for those who collect children's classics. It is also meant for those who only wish to read Lewis Carroll's Alice books, rather than purchasing the Complete Works of Lewis Carroll, which is quite large and heavy. This edition also comes in color, unlike the previous editions, which should be amusing for children as they read it. I personally recommend any collectible edition for Alice fans; the leather bound classics are all beautiful and the works it portrays are literature that has had an impact on history--every book in the series deserves to be placed onto the shelf of every home.
SuzeinNC More than 1 year ago
I got this book as a present for my mother to replace her old and misplaced copy of this story, so I am not able to open the shrink wrap and see the inside, but the outside cover is gorgeous! I am so pleased with how it looks and the quality of the cover which includes the colors, the engraving, and the beautiful artwork. The edges of the pages have a very nice silver sheen. The the size of the book is perfect as it's not too large and heavy, but it's not too small either. Even though I can't open it up and see the pages myself, I am very pleased that it includes the illustrations to the story and that they are in color. I can't wait to give it to her. I'm so in love with it, I may have to order one for myself!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was wonderful reading this with my son. We laughed and wondered together, and we discussed the peculiarities of Wonderland at length. My son was delighted with the riddle, and we tried to figure it out together. An amazing experience.
Norma Jean Joseph More than 1 year ago
Beautifully presented, collectors edition of an excellent seemingly non-sense book that connects life and growing up with fiction and dreamy scenarios in a beautiful way. Although it might seem like meaning is not to be found in this book, on a closer look you will find plenty of it in the purest possible ways. Highly recommended for adults with a knack for enjoying and recognizing sheer madness.
Zoey604 More than 1 year ago
Cant wait to read this book, im a big fan of Alice and wonderland and i hope to receive this book this week! Great remake idea!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Super cute cover - the last review was stupid and not even relevant to the book here. I love it!
hrr More than 1 year ago
Beautiful cover.
Gardenseed More than 1 year ago
This is a beautifully made book - Tenniel illustrations in gentle colors, well-designed, readable type with plenty of white space, a ribbon marker, silver edges. It is a very pretty and readable book, not just for children, but for those of us with elderly eyes who want to reread this old favorite.