An Enchantment of Ravens

An Enchantment of Ravens

by Margaret Rogerson

Hardcover

$16.19 $17.99 Save 10% Current price is $16.19, Original price is $17.99. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Want it by Thursday, September 27  Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.
    Same Day shipping in Manhattan. 
    See Details

Overview

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

An instant New York Times bestseller!
An Indie Next Top 10 Pick
A Parents’ Choice Silver Honor Winner

“A funny, action-packed, and sweet romance.” —School Library Journal (starred review)
“A phenomenal read.” —RT Book Reviews

A skilled painter must stand up to the ancient power of the faerie courts—even as she falls in love with a faerie prince—in this gorgeous bestseller that’s “an ideal pick for fans of Holly Black, Maggie Stiefvater, and Laini Taylor” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

Isobel is an artistic prodigy with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes—a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious, Rook spirits her away to his kingdom to stand trial for her crime. But something is seriously wrong in his world, and they are attacked from every side. With Isobel and Rook depending on each other for survival, their alliance blossoms into trust, then love—and that love violates the fair folks’ ruthless laws. Now both of their lives are forfeit, unless Isobel can use her skill as an artist to fight the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781481497589
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date: 09/26/2017
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 29,305
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Margaret Rogerson is the author of the New York Times bestseller An Enchantment of Ravens and Sorcery of Thorns. She has a bachelor’s degree in cultural anthropology from Miami University. When not reading or writing she enjoys sketching, gaming, making pudding, and watching more documentaries than is socially acceptable (according to some). She lives near Cincinnati, Ohio, beside a garden full of hummingbirds and roses. Visit her at MargaretRogerson.com.

Read an Excerpt

An Enchantment of Ravens


  • MY PARLOR smelled of linseed oil and spike lavender, and a dab of lead tin yellow glistened on my canvas. I had nearly perfected the color of Gadfly’s silk jacket.

    The trick with Gadfly was persuading him to wear the same clothes for every session. Oil paint needs days to dry between layers, and he had trouble understanding I couldn’t just swap his entire outfit for another he liked better. He was astonishingly vain even by fair folk standards, which is like saying a pond is unusually wet, or a bear surprisingly hairy. All in all, it was a disarming quality for a creature who could murder me without rescheduling his tea.

    “I might have some silver embroidery done about the wrists,” he said. “What do you think? You could add that, couldn’t you?”

    “Of course.”

    “And if I chose a different cravat . . .”

    Inwardly, I rolled my eyes. Outwardly, my face ached with the polite smile I’d maintained for the past two and a half hours. Rudeness was not an affordable mistake. “I could alter your cravat, as long as it’s more or less the same size, but I’d need another session to finish it.”

    “You truly are a wonder. Much better than the previous portrait artist—that fellow we had the other day. What was his name? Sebastian Manywarts? Oh, I didn’t like him, he always smelled a bit strange.”

    It took me a moment to realize Gadfly was referring to Silas Merryweather, a master of the Craft who died over three hundred years ago. “Thank you,” I said. “What a thoughtful compliment.”

    “How engaging it is to see the Craft change over time.” Barely listening, he selected one of the cakes from the tray beside the settee. He didn’t eat it immediately, but rather sat staring at it, as an entomologist might having discovered a beetle with its head on backward. “One thinks one has seen the best humans have to offer, and suddenly there’s a new method of glazing china, or these fantastic little cakes with lemon curd inside.”

    By now I was used to fair folk mannerisms. I didn’t look away from his left sleeve, and kept dabbing on the silk’s glossy yellow shine. However, I remembered a time in which the fair folk’s behavior had unsettled me. They moved differently than humans: smoothly, precisely, with a peculiar stiffness to their posture, and never put so much as a finger out of place. They could remain still for hours without blinking, or they could move with such fearsome swiftness as to be upon you before you could even gasp in surprise.

    I sat back, brush in hand, and took in the portrait in its entirety. It was nearly finished. There lay Gadfly’s petrified likeness, as unchanging as he was. Why the fair folk so desired portraits was beyond me. I supposed it had something to do with vanity, and their insatiable thirst to surround themselves with human Craft. They would never reflect on their youth, because they knew nothing else, and by the time they died, if they even did, their portraits would be long rotted away to nothing.

    Gadfly appeared to be a man in his middle thirties. Like every example of his kind he was tall, slim, and beautiful. His eyes were the clear crystal blue of the sky after rain has washed away the summer heat, his complexion as pale and flawless as porcelain, and his hair the radiant silver-gold of dew illuminated by a sunrise. I know it sounds ridiculous, but fair folk require such comparisons. There’s simply no other way to describe them. Once, a Whimsical poet died of despair after finding himself unequal to the task of capturing a fair one’s beauty in simile. I think it more likely he died of arsenic poisoning, but so the story goes.

    You must keep in mind, of course, that all of this is only a glamour, not what they really look like underneath.

    Fair folk are talented dissemblers, but they can’t lie outright. Their glamour always has a flaw. Gadfly’s flaw was his fingers; they were far too long to be human and sometimes appeared oddly jointed. If someone looked at his hands too long he would lace them together or scurry them under a napkin like a pair of spiders to put them out of sight. He was the most personable fair one I knew, far more relaxed about manners than the rest of them, but staring was never a good idea—unless, like me, you had a good reason to.

    Finally, Gadfly ate the cake. I didn’t see him chew before he swallowed.

    “We’re just about finished for the day,” I told him. I wiped my brush on a rag, then dropped it into the jar of linseed oil beside my easel. “Would you like to take a look?”

    “Need you even ask? Isobel, you know I’d never pass up the opportunity to admire your Craft.”

    Before I knew it Gadfly stood leaning over my shoulder. He kept a courteous space between us, but his inhuman scent enveloped me: a ferny green fragrance of spring leaves, the sweet perfume of wildflowers. Beneath that, something wild—something that had roamed the forest for millennia, and had long spidery fingers that could crush a human’s throat while its owner wore a cordial smile.

    My heart skipped a beat. I am safe in this house, I reminded myself.

    “I believe I do like this cravat best after all,” he said. “Exquisite work, as always. Now, what am I paying you, again?”

    I stole a glance at his elegant profile. A strand of hair had slipped from the blue ribbon at the nape of his neck as if by accident. I wondered why he’d arranged it that way. “We agreed on an enchantment for our hens,” I reminded him. “Each of them will lay six good eggs per week for the rest of their lives, and they must not die early for any reason.”

    “So practical.” He sighed at the tragedy. “You are the most admired Crafter of this age. Imagine all the things I could give you! I could make pearls drop from your eyes in place of tears. I could lend you a smile that enslaves men’s hearts, or a dress that once beheld is never forgotten. And yet you request eggs.”

    “I quite like eggs,” I replied firmly, well aware that the enchantments he described would all turn strange and sour, even deadly, in the end. Besides, what on earth would I do with men’s hearts? I couldn’t make an omelette out of them.

    “Oh, very well, if you insist. You’ll find the enchantment in effect beginning tomorrow. With that I’m afraid I must be off—I’ve the embroidery to ask after.”

    I stood with a creak of my chair and dropped him a curtsy as he paused at the door. He gave an elegant bow in response. Like most fair folk he was adept at pretending he returned the courtesy by choice, not a strict compulsion that was, to him, as necessary as breathing.

    “Aha,” he added, straightening, “I’d nearly forgotten. We’ve had gossip in the spring court that the autumn prince is going to pay you a visit. Imagine that! I look forward to hearing whether he manages to sit through an entire session, or hares off after the Wild Hunt as soon as he’s arrived.”

    I wasn’t able to school my expression at the news. I stood gaping at Gadfly until a puzzled smile crossed his lips and he extended his pale hand in my direction, perhaps trying to determine whether I’d died standing up, not an unreasonable concern, as to him humans no doubt seemed to expire at the slightest provocation.

    “The autumn—” My voice came out rough. I closed my mouth and cleared my throat. “Are you quite certain? I was under the impression the autumn prince did not visit Whimsy. No one has seen him in hundreds . . .” Words failed me.

    “I assure you, he is alive and well. Why, I saw him at a ball just yesterday. Or was it last month? In any event, he shall be here tomorrow. Do pass on my regards.”

    “It—it will be an honor,” I stammered, mentally cringing at my uncharacteristic loss of composure. Suddenly in need of fresh air, I crossed the room to open the door. I showed Gadfly out and stood gazing across the field of summer wheat as his figure receded up the path.

    A cloud passed beneath the sun, and a shadow fell across my house. The season never changed in Whimsy, but as first one leaf dropped from the tree in the lane, and then another, I couldn’t help but feel some transformation was afoot. Whether or not I approved of it remained to be seen.

  • Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    See All Customer Reviews

    An Enchantment of Ravens 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    I put off reading this book due to the numerous mixed reviews. People seemed to either love this story or hate it. Well, I absolutely positively LOVE LOVE LOVED it. I'm so mad at myself for not reading this book sooner. An Enchantment of Ravens was everything I hoped it would be and more. Plot Margaret Rogerson weaves a magical, spellbinding, fairytale-esque story. Everything we grew up hearing about faeries is true in this tale: they cannot lie, iron can kill them, they are immortal, and they are notorious tricksters. However, Rogerson puts her own spin on things by making it so that faeries are unable to perform craft such as: painting, drawing, writing, cooking, etc. The faeries cannot perform craft so they desire finding talented humans who can--that is where Isobel, our main character, comes into play. Isobel is the best portrait artist of her time. All of the fae want her to paint them. Our story begins to take off when one of her best customers, Gadfly, recommends Isobel to Rook, the prince of the Autumn court. Rook has not visited Whimsy, Isobel's town, in centuries. Yet, he comes so he can have her paint his portrait. While Rook is there he and Isobel bond. He is very different than any other faerie Isobel has encountered. This leads her to paint sorrow--a human emotion--in his eyes. Once this painting is unveiled in the Autumn Court everyone, including Rook, is horrified. All of the fae now see Rook as weak. Feeling as if he has no other option, Rook seeks out Isobel and begins to drag her to the Autumn court, so she can stand trial. Many magical encounters, beasts, humor, and banter abound from here. World-Building Whimsy is in eternal summer. Every day is full of sunshine, warm weather, and lively plants. So, when Isobel is taken into the faerie lands she finally experiences other seasons such as winter, spring, and autumn. Her wonder and appreciation for these new lands is impeccably written. I can honestly feel Isobel's awe. These lands are simply magical. Rogerson's prose brings them alive on the page; it truly feels as if you are there with Isobel and Rook. Characters Rook was by far my favorite character. He is adorable. I love how straight forward he is with Isobel right off the bat, sure faeries cannot lie but Rook never tries to purposefully mislead her with his words. Although Rook is centuries years old (I'm not sure how old exactly) he still has this youthful aura to him. Out of all the fae we encounter in this story, Rook is the one who seems to have the most "humanity". Fae aren't supposed to ever encounter and actually feel human emotions yet Rook does. Ah, I just love him. Isobel was everything I wanted in a main character. She was strong, kind, intelligent, resourceful, and witty. I loved how she messed with Rook since he doesn't understand a lot about humans. I loved her banter with Rook. Quite frankly, I just love Isobel. Overall If I've said it once then I've probably said it a million times: I love this story. This story was such an adventure. I cannot wait for Rogerson to write her next book. She is definitely an auto-buy author for me now. This story is one of my absolute favorite fantasy books, fae related books, and romance. It's just such a sweet story.
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    I put off reading this book due to the numerous mixed reviews. People seemed to either love this story or hate it. Well, I absolutely positively LOVE LOVE LOVED it. I'm so mad at myself for not reading this book sooner. An Enchantment of Ravens was everything I hoped it would be and more. Plot Margaret Rogerson weaves a magical, spellbinding, fairytale-esque story. Everything we grew up hearing about faeries is true in this tale: they cannot lie, iron can kill them, they are immortal, and they are notorious tricksters. However, Rogerson puts her own spin on things by making it so that faeries are unable to perform craft such as: painting, drawing, writing, cooking, etc. The faeries cannot perform craft so they desire finding talented humans who can--that is where Isobel, our main character, comes into play. Isobel is the best portrait artist of her time. All of the fae want her to paint them. Our story begins to take off when one of her best customers, Gadfly, recommends Isobel to Rook, the prince of the Autumn court. Rook has not visited Whimsy, Isobel's town, in centuries. Yet, he comes so he can have her paint his portrait. While Rook is there he and Isobel bond. He is very different than any other faerie Isobel has encountered. This leads her to paint sorrow--a human emotion--in his eyes. Once this painting is unveiled in the Autumn Court everyone, including Rook, is horrified. All of the fae now see Rook as weak. Feeling as if he has no other option, Rook seeks out Isobel and begins to drag her to the Autumn court, so she can stand trial. Many magical encounters, beasts, humor, and banter abound from here. World-Building Whimsy is in eternal summer. Every day is full of sunshine, warm weather, and lively plants. So, when Isobel is taken into the faerie lands she finally experiences other seasons such as winter, spring, and autumn. Her wonder and appreciation for these new lands is impeccably written. I can honestly feel Isobel's awe. These lands are simply magical. Rogerson's prose brings them alive on the page; it truly feels as if you are there with Isobel and Rook. Characters Rook was by far my favorite character. He is adorable. I love how straight forward he is with Isobel right off the bat, sure faeries cannot lie but Rook never tries to purposefully mislead her with his words. Although Rook is centuries years old (I'm not sure how old exactly) he still has this youthful aura to him. Out of all the fae we encounter in this story, Rook is the one who seems to have the most "humanity". Fae aren't supposed to ever encounter and actually feel human emotions yet Rook does. Ah, I just love him. Isobel was everything I wanted in a main character. She was strong, kind, intelligent, resourceful, and witty. I loved how she messed with Rook since he doesn't understand a lot about humans. I loved her banter with Rook. Quite frankly, I just love Isobel. Overall If I've said it once then I've probably said it a million times: I love this story. This story was such an adventure. I cannot wait for Rogerson to write her next book. She is definitely an auto-buy author for me now. This story is one of my absolute favorite fantasy books, fae related books, and romance. It's just such a sweet story.
    Anonymous 11 months ago
    I seriously could not put this book down once I started it. What a whimsical story with such darling characters, told with such beautiful writing. I sincerely hope there’s more to come with this tale in the future, because I can’t get enough of it!
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    Yes!
    Kendra Bahr More than 1 year ago
    I read a lot of reviews about this book that were negative and I am not sure why!! I absolutely loved this book!! I am going to try to write this review without any spoilers so it might be a bit vague, but this books is adventure, fantasy (magic), and some romance (nothing to bad). It is about 300 pages and I finished it in 1 day (I couldn't put it down). How the world is explained is awesome, the characters are awesome (my favorite are March, May, and Rook). There is some humor in the book that I loved (being assassinated by a teapot). Over all I wish there was another book written I didn't want to let go of the world just yet, but over all I would say it is one of my favorite novels.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    I had so many mixed feelings with this book. I picked it up originally because I love faeries. This book just fell so short with me though. I dont think Isobel was a strong enough protaganist to follow. Although Rook intruiged me, I couldn't get invested in his story. Again, I love books about the fae but this world didn't captivate me. I dont know if it was the writing style or thr world building itself. I found myself skimming a lot of parts wishing for more action.
    MinaTheFangirl More than 1 year ago
    The first (and last) faerie-centric book I read was awful and felt like torture forcing myself to finish it (if you absolutely must know, it was Wicked Lovely), so I was understandably a bit hesitant about picking up An Enchantment of Ravens. What convinced me, however, was the hype around the book before its debut and the gorgeous cover. On a whim, I borrowed the audio book on Overdrive because I wasn't in the mood to read the other books I had and, wow. Not once did I expect I would be hooked by Margaret's beautiful writing, compelling characters, and fascinating world building, all within the first chapter. It's not an exaggeration when I say Margaret's prose is absolutely gorgeous. Isobel is such an interesting, compelling, and admirable character and I could not help but find her absolutely lovable. She's so strong-willed, wise, and loyal to her family. Also, not only is she an extremely talented artist for her young age, but she is also very cunning - something she had to be in order to deal with her usual clientele of mischievous fair-folk. Unlike most of the people in the village of Whimsy, Isobel was always extremely careful and very practical when it came to receiving enchantments as payment for her Craft from the faeries. I also really admire her determination to stay true to herself, especially when it would have been easier to do the exact opposite. And, speaking of Craft (basically anything that people do to create something, like cooking, painting, writing, etc.), I thought the entire concept of it and how the faeries all crave it but are literally unable to perform any of it themselves was so interesting! The world-building of the human village of Whimsy, the World Beyond, and the Faerie Courts is crafted and woven together so seamlessly that it was so easy to picture everything. Margaret was able to create such an interesting and magical world without weighing it down with too much new concepts that would have taken me more time to digest, which is what usually happens to me when I read fantasies. And I can't do this review without expressing my complete adoration for Rook. Even though he was arrogant I found it to actually be quite endearing, especially when Isobel would call him out on being a showing off. I loved seeing him slowly learn more about people, specifically human emotions, through his journey with Isobel. I thought that their feelings for each other in the beginning (even though, chronologically, it occurred over the course of several weeks) were a bit rushed, but I didn't mind so much because I just adore them both so much, and also, later on it was further developed. Honestly, I didn't really notice the insta-love much at all because I was so focused on their crazy journey together, encountering one threat after another, and the revealing of the ugliness hidden behind all the beauty of the world of the fae. I also just really love their characters in general, and the chemistry they had. That being said, I thought the plot was a bit predictable at times but didn't mind too much, especially since there were other plot twists that took me completely by surprise. Overall, I definitely recommend An Enchantment of Ravens if you love reading about adventures and politics in a faerie world and enjoy a (sort of) hate-to-love fairy-tale style romance, featuring an arrogant but endearing faerie prince and a smart and strong-willed artist, all told in gorgeous prose.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    This book is captivating from start to finish!
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    I read the whole thing in less than 12 hours i think. I devoured it because it was so amazing and enchanting. One of if not the best book about the Fey I have ever come across. Sweet yet scary in the right places I think i held my breath through the whole thing. You need this book in your life right now. I'm so happy to have stumbled across it.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    I've been looking for something new to read since falling in love with Sarah J. Mass's A Court of Thorns and Roses series. This was it!! Very well written, loved the characters. I only wish it hadn't ended so suddenly. I hope there will be a sequel!
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    One of the best books I’ve read in a long time. If you’re a fan of Sarah J. Maas, then this story is right up your alley. The imagery flows across the pages like paintbrush strokes on a canvas, pulling you along with the ebb and flow of the plot without letting on to its ultimate conclusion. The suspense latches onto you and doesn’t subside until the very last page. Highly recommend!
    thereadingchick More than 1 year ago
    An Enchantment of Ravens is a fairy-tale fantasy about a girl named Isobel who is a portrait artist to the fair folk. In the town of Whimsy, the fair folk come and purchase craft from the artisans. In return they exact payment in the form of spells. Isobel has learned at the tender age of seventeen to be very exact in her negotiations because the fair folk are not honest in their negotiations and what seems an innocent wish for true love may become an obsessive infatuation. When Rook, the Prince of the Autumn lands comes to have his portrait painted Isobel see’s something in his eyes that she must paint on canvas. Unfortunately what she paints is a humanity that the fair folk do not wish to see, and Rook spirits her away to stand trial for her error. During this journey she and Rook come to an understanding finding friendship and love which is against the fair folk’s laws. I was captured by the charm and spirit of this novel. The author painted her words so they flowed lyrically across the page. The melding of commonly heard folk tales such as the fae can’t speak a lie, with a new fair folk history made the story both familiar and foreign, making it easy to huddle into my blanket on the couch and immerse myself into this enchanted land. Isobel for being a seventeen year old girl, was wise beyond her years. She was essentially the adult in her household, responsible for her two sisters and her aunt. When she is spirited away by Rook, she gives in to the adventure, worrying about her family, but also seeing new shapes and colors in every hill and tree opening her eyes to the world as a whole rather than Whimsy’s summer colors and sounds. I loved how her emotions were painted in colors. Rook was an interesting hero. He was one of the fair folk and his glamour was beautiful, but underneath that glamour was a reality that contrasted with that beauty they all wanted to portray. That contrast between fae reality and glamour was found throughout the story giving this a real fairy tale feel, more Grimm than Disney. He and Isobel’s love ran a similar juxtaposition from her innocent first love to gritty heart wrenching pain. I loved how this novel ran from one spectrum to the other in a rainbow of colors from light to dark and back again. The story and the feelings all those colors imbued captured me completely.
    TheKnightsWhoSayBook More than 1 year ago
    How could I not love a book that uses such descriptions for its love interest as “with the bold and unself-conscious vanity of a cat sitting down on an open book”? I honestly don't have the words to explain how deeply the things I loved about An Enchantment of Ravens affected me. This book is beautiful, funny, and captivating. I love the blend of traditional fair folk elements like their compulsion to return all polite gestures and the danger of them knowing your true name with the touches that made this book unique — namely, the writing. Many of my favorite lines revolved around the love interest, Rook (a multifaceted fairy prince who's both sweet and overly prideful), or the main character Isobel's sensibleness clashing with the strangeness of the fair folk. The writing style also contributed to beautiful settings and descriptions that really resonated with me. This book definitely didn't try to shave off the unsavory parts of fairy myths. The fair folk are manipulative and dangerous, and truly horrifying beneath their glamours. The exploration of the fairy realms reveals layer upon layer of their society, so the tension and action builds up really slowly and gets amazingly good by the end. However, as much as I loved the gorgeous travels through the fairy lands and Isobel and Rook's personalities, I think the slow plot was an issue. I felt like the plot was just loose and inconsequential for about half the book. When the action started it was great! But the plot needed to assert itself sooner in the story to tie together more cohesively. But there are so many things to love here. Little girls who used to be goats eating things they shouldn't (be able to) eat. A romance that explicitly addresses the power imbalance and the importance of Isobel's will. Plot twists, which is something you don't expect from a book that spends a significant amount of time wandering through the forest. High stakes and tension-filled scenes and dangerous magic contrasted with peaceful forest-wandering. The theme of the act of creation versus the hoarding of the treasures created. The horror of what the fair folk really are, and the constant question — is it better to be a fair one or to be human? This book filled me up with emotion and my heart cracked at the ending. I need another book by Margaret Rogerson so badly.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    . I am heartily glad I chose thish book. Definitely a book with surprises and well written characters. I would love a sequel to let me know what happens with Isobel and Rook next. I highly recommend this book. ....
    onemused More than 1 year ago
    "An Enchantment of Ravens" is a great stand-alone YA fantasy/romance about the "fair folk" (fae/fairy) and their relationships with humans in the town of Whimsy. Humans are valued for their ability to Craft or to create, be it art, music, or clothes. For a fair one to do Craft would mean death. The fair folk enjoy Craft so they "pay" humans to create it for them in exchange for Enchantments. If not carefully worded, the Enchantments can be more of a curse than a blessing. Isobel is valued for her Craft of portraiture. She has been frequented by fair folk, particularly from the spring court, to do their portraits. She finds it somewhat awkward to interact with them, not only because of their deviousness and power, but also their lack of emotions and blank expressions. Their immortality removes them from human emotions. Things begin to change when the autumn court prince, Rook, comes to Isobel for his portrait. As they spend time together, Isobel begins to fall in love with him. Seeing sadness in his eyes, she paints them as she observes them. However, this is viewed as a weakness which makes him vulnerable among the fair folk. After the portrait was sent, Rook returns to bring Isobel to trial for the crime of painting human sadness in his eyes- the penalty of which is likely death. On their path to his court for trial, they begin to learn more about each other and Rook finds himself unable to bring her to trial. They concoct a ruse and travel to the spring court where Isobel begins to paint the fair folk with human emotions (and this has power to give them some semblance of emotions as mentioned in the synopsis). The Good Law prevents fair folk and humans from being in love, and as Isobel and Rook come to terms with their emotions, they face the penalty of death. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and the pace was great. I felt that their relationship was a little superficial in that we don't see much of the depth to their interactions until later in the book and I would have liked to see their romance building a bit more. The writing was really superb, and it flowed beautifully. The descriptions were really fantastic and brought you into the story. The fair folk really balanced the line between creepy and fascinating (as per design I think). This was a tough book to put down. I think this will be a huge hit with fans of Maas's Court series! It's a great YA fantasy and forbidden romance that works perfectly as a stand alone.
    onemused More than 1 year ago
    "An Enchantment of Ravens" is a great stand-alone YA fantasy/romance about the "fair folk" (fae/fairy) and their relationships with humans in the town of Whimsy. Humans are valued for their ability to Craft or to create, be it art, music, or clothes. For a fair one to do Craft would mean death. The fair folk enjoy Craft so they "pay" humans to create it for them in exchange for Enchantments. If not carefully worded, the Enchantments can be more of a curse than a blessing. Isobel is valued for her Craft of portraiture. She has been frequented by fair folk, particularly from the spring court, to do their portraits. She finds it somewhat awkward to interact with them, not only because of their deviousness and power, but also their lack of emotions and blank expressions. Their immortality removes them from human emotions. Things begin to change when the autumn court prince, Rook, comes to Isobel for his portrait. As they spend time together, Isobel begins to fall in love with him. Seeing sadness in his eyes, she paints them as she observes them. However, this is viewed as a weakness which makes him vulnerable among the fair folk. After the portrait was sent, Rook returns to bring Isobel to trial for the crime of painting human sadness in his eyes- the penalty of which is likely death. On their path to his court for trial, they begin to learn more about each other and Rook finds himself unable to bring her to trial. They concoct a ruse and travel to the spring court where Isobel begins to paint the fair folk with human emotions (and this has power to give them some semblance of emotions as mentioned in the synopsis). The Good Law prevents fair folk and humans from being in love, and as Isobel and Rook come to terms with their emotions, they face the penalty of death. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and the pace was great. I felt that their relationship was a little superficial in that we don't see much of the depth to their interactions until later in the book and I would have liked to see their romance building a bit more. The writing was really superb, and it flowed beautifully. The descriptions were really fantastic and brought you into the story. The fair folk really balanced the line between creepy and fascinating (as per design I think). This was a tough book to put down. I think this will be a huge hit with fans of Maas's Court series! It's a great YA fantasy and forbidden romance that works perfectly as a stand alone.
    Bayy2455 More than 1 year ago
    Originally posted on bayyinwonderland.wordpress.com 5 Stars This is probably my favorite read of the entire year. I fell so hard for this world and everyone within it. It was a fantastic debut to the published world. The darker turn for Fae in this novel was utterly refreshing and deliciously. Fae usually have absolutely everything they could ever want: exquisite looks, more money they could ever spend, and more power than anyone should ever posses. But the Fae in this world are not what they seem at all. They're tricky and wicked creatures, one you have to watch every single word with. They fit more with the older tales of the Fae. My favorite part about these Fae were the fact they couldn't do anything for themselves. They possessed all the magic in the world for spells and sorcery yet they couldn't do something as simple as make a piece of toast. They were completely dependent on humans for everything, from their clothing to their pastries. The other thing that was delicious about these creatures was the fact they were glamoured the entire time. They were not gorgeous, human looking creatures with pointy ears but rather dark and disgusting monsters. Terrying creatures with long claws. Another thing interesting about these Fae were they all had a flaw. From humanity in their eyes to too long fingers, their glamours were never perfect. There was always something wrong with them, something almost human. The journey through the land of the Fae was and exciting and utterly terrifying. This book read very much like an older fairy tale. The gritty kind where the victim tricks their captors and some limb loss is involved. Rook was absolutely swoon worthy and the relationship between him and Isobel was complex and wonderful. Of course there was the usual banter and flirting, but Isobel questions her feelings more than once and why she feels that way, challenging the insta-love narrative that is the usual of these stories. If you love fae, swoon worthy princes, grand journeys, or gritty fairy tales make sure you pick this one up. I suggest reading it when the leaves change so you can feel as if Rook is right next to you.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    Great
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    Isobel lives in a town where it's eternally summer and is a master painter highly sought after by the capricious fae. In this world, the fae are unpredictable and often malicious in their enchantments so Isobel takes payment in the form of enchantments that will protect her and her family from fae harm. I loved this setup. I am all for dark fae. But it felt like all this cool setup was wasted. The ball starts rolling when the prince of the autumn court commissions her for a portrait, and they fall in love with each other after 5 minutes when Isobel realizes he's "not like the other fae". Likes: - It's very beautifully written and a pleasure to read - I loved the cruel fae and the way they're required to follow polite customs like bowing back - The setup with the town cut off from the rest of the world and being forever in summer is awesome - How the fae can't create anything and that's why they're obsessed with human "craft" Dislikes: - The romance was very sudden - It became all about the romance - The whole rationale Rook had for kidnapping Isobel was really shaky, especially when she's manages to convince him it's a dumb idea in about 3 seconds, and by that point every one wants them dead I recommend it if you like books with fae, or just for a quick enjoyable read, but I will probably not reread this one
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    Details are good, but sometimes overwhelming. The story and characters are nicely developed, but the romance felt a little rushed. The end left me wondering if there was going to be more to the story or if this was it! And it doesn’t really seem like there will be anymore written which is truly a bummer as I wanted so much more. It just felt like there Needed to be more.
    Alyssa75 More than 1 year ago
    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books Publication Date: September 26, 2017 Rating: 4 stars Source: eARC from NetGalley Summary (from Goodreads): Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized among them. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes – a weakness that could cost him his life. Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love, violating the fair folks’ ruthless Good Law. There's only one way to save both their lives, Isobel must drink from the Green Well, whose water will transform her into a fair one—at the cost of her Craft, for immortality is as stagnant as it is timeless. Isobel has a choice: she can sacrifice her art for a future, or arm herself with paint and canvas against the ancient power of the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel. What I Liked: This book is every bit as captivating and enchanting as you might hear. I've seen people discussing it for months now, sharing excitement and desperation for it. I personally had no intentions of reading the book, because I'd seen people compare it to Sarah J. Maas's ACOTAR, and I had way too many issues with ACOTAR to want to read something similar. But this fae book was incredibly different and not at all anything like ACOTAR. I hate SJM's books but I highly recommend this one, either way. Don't let comparisons fool you! They work for some, but not for others. This book needed no comparison, and can stand on its own without needing SJM or anyone else as a crutch. Isobel is an extremely talented artist, and does portraits of the fair folk. Her Craft of painting portraits is incredibly well-known, and fair folk flock to have their portrait done. One day, the autumn prince returns after hundreds of years of being away from Whimsy. When Isobel draws his portrait with sorrow in his eyes, she doesn't realize that this is a grave error - to draw human emotion on a fair folk. This is a weakness that the autumn prince does not need. So he spirits her away to take her to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. But they are chased by the Hounds of the Great Hunt, sent by the Alder King. What's more, Rook and Isobel fall in love, which breaks to Good Law that humans and fair folk are forbidden to fall in love. Isobel must sacrifice her life or Rook's, or they both must die. The author's writing is so lovely! Read the rest of my review on my blog, The Eater of Books! - eaterofbooks DOT blogspot DOT com :)
    TheChubbyGuitar More than 1 year ago
    Excellent book, compelling, romantic, adventurous, and beautiful. Wonderful writing and a great ending. I highly recommend this book.
    Seoling More than 1 year ago
    Ahhhh, AN ENCHANTMENT OF RAVENS was seriously one of my most anticipated this year, like…top five. I’d been dying for a copy and was pretty devasated when I learned too late that they’d been given out at BookCon. It was just so close and yet so far! But fortunately, I was able to secure my beautiful advanced copy and it will remain in my ARC library forever. Why? Because it just has a lot going for it. LIKE THE COVER. Oh my gosh, when I learned that Charlie Bowater was the cover artist for it, I couldn’t not get it, you know? I am an enormous fan of hers and I’ve loved the art that she’s done in the past for other authors. The cover alone was enough for me to add it to most anticipated. Diving into the story as a whole, I was told by Kristen that there were definitely a lot of humorous tones to the book and I didn’t know what to expect. To be quite honest, I thought it was equal parts angsty and humorous. I really loved those funny undertones because they weren’t your typical signs of humor. It was more or less like a dry, crass kind of humor that I think really add to a story if done right. I think that Rogerson did a great job with the humor and I did find myself smiling at some parts. I think it also helped liven the dynamic between Rook and Isobel and made their relationship so much more genuine despite the worlds they were from. One of my favorite parts of the story was getting into Isobel’s craft. The descriptions about the portraits and how Rogerson describes all the pigments is so gorgeous and colorful. I fell in love with her descriptive language. It completely immersed me and made me want to go berry hunting so that I could crush blackberries to give me the deepest reds and blueberries to give me the deepest purples. AHHH. Rook, although I knew he was supposed to be this handsome, attractive faerie prince, but he didn’t come off that way to me. He was just so…kooky? I mean, I definitely found him to be an attractive male character, but I didn’t think he fit into the mold of what we call potential fictional boyfriends. Which I always find to be refreshing. It’s rare that I do not possess the desire to scream, BOOK BOYFRIEND! but Rook makes me think of that guy who belongs with this person and that he’d make a nice brother to me. Does that make sense? He’s just a good well-rounded character and I really did love watching his character interact with the others. Also, I loved March and May. Despite the little presence that they had in AEOR, I just thought they were so funny and adorable and the types of goats-turned-younger-sisters I would want. To be quite honest, there were a few things that I did have hesitations with. I did not think there was character growth for Isobel or for Rook. I felt like it was more or less a story of two characters falling in love with a beautiful backdrop of Whimsy and the season courts. It’s like one of those movies that you go for for the adventure and the action rather than the character development. What happens around the characters is enough to keep it interesting and I absolutely do believe that is the case here. The first two-thirds of the book were really good. I couldn’t put the book down. I think the pace was perfect, especially considering this is a standalone. But then once they reached the spring courts, the pace picked up and everything seemed to happen really fast.
    ruthsic More than 1 year ago
    I love fairytales and was excited for a fresh new take on the fae genre. Granted a lot of readers will find similarities between An Enchantment of Ravens and A Court of Thorns and Roses, there are elements that set it apart from the latter. Firstly, a lot of fae lore is still embedded in the canon of the novel, but you also have smaller newer things like their compulsion to return courtesies, the Good Law, etc. The story is pretty straightforward until we are reaching the climax – Isobel, a painter, accidentally offends Rook, the autumn prince by painting a human emotion, sorrow on his face (which WAS actually on his face) and he kidnaps her to stand trial at his court. On the way, they keep getting attacked by the Wild Hunt, they start getting close to each other, but have to hide it when they take refuge in the spring court. Faery stuff happens and we get a somewhat open-ended story, but it is a satisfactory ending. The best thing I loved about the book is the writing. Rogerson writes in a lyrical and beautiful manner, and since it is through the eyes of a painter character, it adds to the imagery created. You have these exquisite scenes building up in your head, which come alive with Isobel’s sharp wit and sarcastic inner monologue. She is a simultaneously young-and-old character – young because she is 17 and has not much experience with love, but old because she grew up faster taking care of her household, her aunt and her two little sisters (who are actually enchanted goats!), as well being on her toes since a young age when it came to the fae. Having patrons since she was 12, Isobel is particularly wily and shrewd when it comes to dealing with fae, a fact that helps her survival throughout the book. When Rook comes and she gets to know him during their painting sessions, she starts falling for him. But when he kidnaps her, her affection (naturally) wanes. As they journey, and discover more about the other’s personality, a mutual affection starts building up again. But he is an immortal and she is a human and you know how that story goes – but surprisingly there wasn’t the angst I was dreading. Rook is surprisingly adorable, a cat (even Isobel says so) in fae form – he is haughty, impulsive and childlike (like the fae), ignorant of human customs but kind at most times. His regular pouting and tantrums and her at times challenging him and using his nature to her benefit had me in splits most of the time. Like there is this scene where he turns into a crow and she wants him to continue being a crow for a while so as to hide him, but he doesn’t want to – so she croons about how beautiful a bird he makes and he is instantly mollified. His smugness and arrogance come off as charming AND annoying, but goddammit he is cute. I think it is mostly because he tries to come off as this cool regal prince but fails like 80% of the time. But enough about the romance! The central arc of the book is about the difference between humans and fae, and how fae crave human things called Craft (basically any artistic/creative thing the humans make) but also don’t like to be seen as weak as having human emotions. When her paintings are able to evoke feelings in them, a change starts but we do not know until the end what that meant for the path she was on. Her journey was a shift in the fae courts, but what her paintings served for beyond evoking emotions and what it means for the future of the fae is not clear. This is why I felt the ending lacked a con
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    An Enchantment of Ravens by Margret Rogerson paints an effortless world that lives in tandem with fairies. Immortality comes with a curse of an unchanging life, and so, they can not practice any act of creation from painting to cooking. Instead, humans in the adjacent town of Whimsy provide these goods and services to these unchanging creatures. Isobel, a famed portrait artist makes the mistake of painting human emotion of the autumn prince. When this is viewed as an act of defiance, she is taken away from her home and is forced to confront the fair folk. Most of this book is honestly terrifying. A lack of emotion paired with vast power makes for a terrifying society who can’t examine their own flaws. The book makes it difficult to truly buy into the romantic plot most of the action relies on. Rogerson relies on the razor thin edge of beauty and terror to create Isobel’s world and her actions within it. Overall, I did enjoy the novel and I am in love with the portrait on the cover. If you were a fan of A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J Maas or The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black, you will enjoy An Enchantment of Ravens by Margret Rogerson.