Assertion

Assertion

by M. Jary

Hardcover(2010)

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Overview

Assertion is a term frequently used in linguistics and philosophy but rarely defined. This in-depth study surveys and synthesizes a range of philosophical, linguistic and psychological literature on the topic, and then presents a detailed account of the cognitive processes involved in the interpretation of assertions.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780230573994
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan UK
Publication date: 07/30/2010
Series: Palgrave Studies in Pragmatics, Language and Cognition
Edition description: 2010
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

MARK JARY teaches Linguistics, Translation and Philosophy of Language at Roehampton University, London, UK. His previous publications include papers in Linguistics and Philosophy, Lingua and The Journal of Pragmatics.

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables ix

Acknowledgements x

1 Introduction 1

2 Assertion in Speech-act Theory 6

2.1 Introduction 6

2.2 Two types of speech-act theorist 6

2.3 Speech-act fundamentalists and assertion 16

2.4 Conclusion 30

3 Assertion, Belief and Knowledge 32

3.1 Introduction 32

3.2 Assertion and belief: what is the correct order of explanation? 33

3.3 Assertion and belief attribution 38

3.4 Assertion and knowledge 46

3.5 Conclusion 50

4 A Sign of Assertion 52

4.1 Introduction 52

4.2 Frege's assertion sign 53

4.3 Assertion: illocution and inference 56

4.4 A natural-language assertion sign? 59

4.5 Conclusion 82

5 Assertion and Common Ground 84

5.1 Introduction 84

5.2 Sense, force and representation in Stalnaker's account 85

5.3 Assertion and presupposition 92

5.4 Comparison with Relevance Theory 99

5.5 Conclusion 103

6 Assertion and Mood 105

6.1 Introduction 105

6.2 Mood in formal semantics 105

6.3 Speech-act approaches to mood 120

6.4 Conclusion 128

7 Assertion and Main Point 129

7.1 Introduction 129

7.2 Non-asserted main point 130

7.3 Assertion, presupposition and conventional implicature 134

7.4 Ordered entailments 138

7.5 Conclusion 148

8 Assertion and Relevance 150

8.1 Introduction 150

8.2 Relevance in a context vs. relevance to an individual 151

8.3 Context types 152

8.4 Mood and force 155

8.5 Assertion and main point 173

8.6 Relevance maximising vs. relevance optimising 177

8.7 Comparison with other frameworks 192

8.8 Conclusion 194

9 Conclusion 196

Notes 199

References 211

Index 219

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