Biological Beekeeping: The Way Back

Biological Beekeeping: The Way Back

by Dee Lusby, Ed Lusby

Hardcover

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781614761044
Publisher: X-STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
Publication date: 02/10/2018
Pages: 650
Sales rank: 399,055
Product dimensions: 6.50(w) x 1.50(h) x 9.50(d)

About the Author

Ed and Dee are commercial beekeepers in AZ. Dee and Ed work side by side in all phases of their operation. In addition to the conventional activities of beekeeping, they mill their own woodenware and wax foundation, select and maintain a stock of slightly smaller bees highly adapted to their area, and produce their own queens.
Their non-chemical 'back to basics' approach to beekeeping leads them to spend much of their spare time in libraries where they search for obscure bits of information which, when assem-bled in logical order, yield insights into old problems such as bee kills due to the use of pesticides, and new problems like parasitic mites. Such has been their pursuit of an understand-ing of the importance of comb cell diameter
The Lusbys found that comb cell diameter differs among the various sources of foundation manufactured in the United States and around the world. Following publication of this discovery in 1990, they undertook to resolve the question of natural cell diameter and its impact on colony vigor. Having identified, optimal cell diameter for their geographic area (Southern Arizona), they have nearly completed converting their operation to a 'natural system' incorporating smaller cells. They have widely reported to beekeepers that their use of optimal natural cell diameter has significantly reduced disease and mite infestation in their colonies while simultaneously increasing brood viability and colony productivity. Convinced, a number of beekeepers have embraced the Lusby's manage-ment strategies.- American Bee Journal
Note: Ed died Wed, 25th of October 2006

Ed and Dee are commercial beekeepers in AZ. Dee and Ed work side by side in all phases of their operation. In addition to the conventional activities of beekeeping, they mill their own woodenware and wax foundation, select and maintain a stock of slightly smaller bees highly adapted to their area, and produce their own queens.
Their non-chemical 'back to basics' approach to beekeeping leads them to spend much of their spare time in libraries where they search for obscure bits of information which, when assem-bled in logical order, yield insights into old problems such as bee kills due to the use of pesticides, and new problems like parasitic mites. Such has been their pursuit of an understand-ing of the importance of comb cell diameter
The Lusbys found that comb cell diameter differs among the various sources of foundation manufactured in the United States and around the world. Following publication of this discovery in 1990, they undertook to resolve the question of natural cell diameter and its impact on colony vigor. Having identified, optimal cell diameter for their geographic area (Southern Arizona), they have nearly completed converting their operation to a 'natural system' incorporating smaller cells. They have widely reported to beekeepers that their use of optimal natural cell diameter has significantly reduced disease and mite infestation in their colonies while simultaneously increasing brood viability and colony productivity. Convinced, a number of beekeepers have embraced the Lusby's manage-ment strategies.- American Bee Journal
Note: Ed died Wed, 25th of October 2006

Table of Contents

The Way Back To Biological Beekeeping Beekeeping Today in Southern Arizona The Way Back to Biological Beekeeping…The Saga Continues Honey Bee Comb: Brief History, Size and Ramifications Honey bee Comb: Size and Ramifications Retrogression Back to Normal Removable Swarm Catching Frame Recycling Beeswax Making Foundation by Hand Year #3 in the Field Bee Breeding in the Field Suggested Biological Manipulative Field Management for Control of Honey bee Mites Lusby’s (LUS bees) Bee Biometrics According to Prof. Koeniger Appendix A: Articles and studies with the Lusby’s as authors or coauthors On The Size of Cells Conversions - Dr. Shipman, USDA Thelytoky in a Strain of U.S. Honey Bees The Chemical Treadmill Open-Mating Breeding Chart More on Small Cell Foundation for Mite Control Small Cell Size Foundation for Mite Control Arizona Beekeeper Believes Smaller Size Cell Diameter is the Answer to Mite Problems Climate Map Is Smaller Better? Managing Colony Genetics by Grafting and Selecting for Queens with Shorter Development Times Suggested Biological Manipulative Treatment for Control of Honey bee Mites Field Breeding Basics for Honey bees Using Colony Thermodynamics within the Transition Zones Housel Positioning Appendix B: Articles about the Lusbys Lusbys Receive W.A.S. Memorial Award W.A.S. Conference Beekeeping on the Fringe, with Ed & Dee Lusby Natural Size Foundation is the Best Appendix C: Historical Data on the Influence of Cell Size Number of Cells to the In.2 Raising and Introduction of Queens Honey-Comb A Correction from Thos. Wm. Cowan A Study of Natural Honey-Comb The Structure of Comb The Building of Honey Comb A Biometrical Study of the Influence of Size of Brood Cell upon the Size and Variability of the Honeybee-Grout The Influence of Cell Size Recent Work on the Influence of Cell Size Frequent Variation in Cell Size Baudoux’s Work Misunderstood Influence of Size of Brood Cell Upon the Size of the Worker Bee Are We Ready for a New Bee? The Size of Brood-Comb Cells Geometry of the Ideal Bee’s Cell To Obtain the Number of Cells per Dm2 The Efficiency of the Use of Enlarged Cells - 1965 Preference of Varroa jacobsoni Oudemans for Different Cell Types and Some Factors Affecting Reproduction Distribution of Varroa Jacobsoni in Brood Combs of Honey Bee Colonies, and Resultant Effects on Colony Development - Apiacta 1984 The Effect of The Size of Honey Bee Cells on The Rate of Infestation by Varroa Jacobsoni Study of the Preference of the Mite Varroa Jacobsoni for Apis Mellifera Drones The Influence of Cell Size on Infestation Rates by the Mite Varroa Jacobsoni - Apimondia 1985 Effects of Comb Cell Diameter on Parasitic Mite Infestations in Honey Bee Colonies Square Decimeter Measurement Conversion Chart Appendix C: Chemical & Varroa Effects on Honey bees The Effect of Synthetic Pyrethroid Insecticides on Honey Bees in Indiana: Laboratory Studies and a Survey of Beekeepers and Pesticide Applicators Appendix D: Miscellaneous Articles The Truth about Varroa in Brazil Making Comb Foundation Native American Bees Other References About the Authors

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