Birth Certificate: The Story of Danilo Kis

Birth Certificate: The Story of Danilo Kis

by Mark Thompson

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Overview

Birth Certificate: The Story of Danilo Kis by Mark Thompson

Danilo Kis (1935–89) was a Yugoslav novelist, essayist, poet, and translator whose work generated storms of controversy in his homeland but today holds classic status. Kis was championed by prominent literary figures around the world, including Joseph Brodsky, Susan Sontag, Milan Kundera, Philip Roth, Nadine Gordimer, and Salman Rushdie. As more of his works become available in translation, they are prized by an international readership drawn to Kis's innovative brilliance as a storyteller and to his profound meditation on history, culture, and the human condition at the end of the twentieth century.

A subtle analysis of a rich and varied body of writing, Birth Certificate is also a careful and sensitive telling of a life that experienced some of the last century's greatest cruelties. Kis's father was a Hungarian Jew, his mother a Montenegrin of Orthodox faith. The father disappeared into the Holocaust and the son—cosmopolitan, anticommunist, and passionately opposed to the myth-drenched nationalisms of his native lands—grew up chafing against the hypocrisies of Titoism. His writing broke with the epic mode, pioneered modernist techniques in his language, fulminated against literary kitsch, and sketched out a literary heritage "with no Sun as its Center and Tyrant." Joyce and Borges were influences on his writing, which nevertheless is stunningly original. The best known of his works are Garden, Ashes; The Encyclopedia of the Dead; Hourglass; The Anatomy Lesson; and A Tomb for Boris Davidovich.

Over the course of nearly two decades, Mark Thompson studied Kis's papers and interviewed his family members, friends, and admirers. His intimate understanding of the writer's life and his sure grasp of the region's history inform his revelatory readings of Kis's individual works.More than an appreciation of an important literary and cultural figure, this book is also a compelling guide to the destructive policies which would, shortly after Kis’s death, generate the worst violence in Europe since World War II. Thompson’s book pays tribute to Kis’s experimentalism by being itself experimental in form. It is patterned as a series of commentaries on a short autobiographical text that Kis called "Birth Certificate." This unusual structure adds to the interest and intrigue of the book, and is appropriate for treating so autobiographical a writer who believed that literary meaning is always deeply shaped by other texts.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780801448881
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Publication date: 03/19/2013
Pages: 372
Product dimensions: 7.20(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Mark Thompson is the author of A Paper House: The Ending of Yugoslavia, Forging War: The Media in Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Hercegovina, and The White War: Life and Death on the Italian Front, 1915–1919. He lives in Oxford.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Great and Invisible
Birth Certificate (A Short Autobiography) by Danilo Kiš

1. Birth Certificate (A Short Autobiography)
2. My father
3. came into the world
4. in western Hungary
5. and was educated at the commercial college . . .
6. the birthplace of a certain Mr Virág . . .
7. by the grace
8. of Mr Joyce . . .

First Interlude—The Garret (1962)

9. I believe it was the liberal policy . . .
10. together with a desire for integration . . .
11. Many details of the family chronicle . . .
12. Among my ancestors on my mother's side . . .
13. The ethnographic rarity I represent . . .
14. In 1939, in my fourth year . . .
15. my parents had me baptised . . .
16. This saved my life.
17. I lived until my thirteenth year . . .

Second Interlude—Garden, Ashes (1965)

18. I worked as a servant for rich peasants . . .
19. The 'troubling dissimilarity' that Freud calls . . .

Third Interlude—Early Sorrows (1969)

20. in my ninth year I wrote my first poems . . .
21. From my mother I inherited a propensity . . .

Fourth Interlude—Hourglass (1972)

22. And it was not without significance . . .
23. My mother read novels until her twentieth year . . .
24. In 1947 we were repatriated by the Red Cross . . .
25. Immediately after we arrived . . .
26. I had to wait a year or two . . .
27. For two years I learned violin . . .
28. At the secondary school I continued to write . . .
29. We were taught Russian by White Army officers . . .

Fifth Interlude—A Tomb for Boris Davidovich (1976)

30. From the Gymnasium I entered the University . . .

Sixth Interlude—The Anatomy Lesson (1978)

31. As a lector for Serbo-Croatian . . .
32. For the last few years I have been living in Paris . . .

Seventh Interlude—The Encyclopaedia of the Dead (1983)

33 (1983)

Acknowledgements
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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