Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation

Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation

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Can't Stop Won't Stop : A History of the Hip-Hop Generation 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
CaptainCupid More than 1 year ago
Nothing can be taken away from Jeff Chang's passion on the topic. The book itself is very well written and inspiring. The historical portion, however, was not up to par. I grew up in the area of hip hop's birth, I passed out tapes from my backpack. I shook hands with music pioneers. I know the history of it's origin. Hip Hop's MCing subculture was preceeded by African American's toasting tradition. A tradition that can be well understood by a quick search of the album "Hustlers Convention", which inspired Kool Herc to start rhyming at his events. His parties and famous breaks that were inspired by those who danced over the breaks of funk records... NOT DUB MUSIC. I cringed when I had to read of what Chang thought the Bronx concieved Hip Hop from. Chang claimed that Kool Herc came to the Bronx as a DJ and continued on Jamaican musical traditions to create hip hop.. It is a well known fact(various interviews with Kool Herc) that when Clive Campbell(Kool Herc) came to America, he was 12. And did not begin DJing until 6 years later! Clive even noted that what influenced hip hop was James Brown and the Hustlers Convention album. When Clive was asked about how Jamaica influenced him in his DJing, he replied "..I would never try to take anything away from it...But [Hip Hop] didn't have nothin to do with Jamaica!". Clive Campbell also admitted that while in Jamaica, he was "too young" to appreciate the Jamaican music. Also, if (as Chang suggests) dub music was what inspired Hip Hop, then why did Kool Herc already give his infamous (hip hop starting) party before Dub music had officially come to the limelight? Chang's passion being focused to such a bogus theory on Hip Hop's origin is downright embarassin. If you want a better book on Hip Hop Culture, look elsewhere.
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