Changes: A Love Story

Changes: A Love Story

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781558610651
Publisher: Feminist Press at CUNY, The
Publication date: 11/01/1993
Series: Women Writing Africa Series
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 208
Sales rank: 605,035
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Ama Ata Aidoo, one of Ghana's most distinguished writers, won the 1993 Commonwealth Writers Prize, Africa Division, for the novel Changes. She is also the author of two plays, poetry, and another novel, Our Sister Killjoy or Reflections From a Black-eyed Squint.

What People are Saying About This

Nikki Giovanni

"A wonderfully warm novel that truly shows that the more things remain the same (love) the more changes we (society) go through."

Introduction

"Aidoo has reaffirmed my failth in the power of the written word to reach, to teach, to empower and encourage."

Customer Reviews

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Changes 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
fieldnotes on LibraryThing 17 days ago
This is my first exposure to Aidoo, who is better known for her drama than for her fiction. "Changes" is a compact and mature look at a woman's inability to find satisfactory companionship and love in modern day Accra, Ghana. The insights into polygamy from both the female and the male perspective were fascinating and the passages showcasing marriage negotiations and traditions were a definite highlight. The writing itself is fairly spare and unremarkable, earning perhaps a mental grin now and then. At times it seems so matter-of-fact and confined to the protagonist's head that a reader wonders if it will devolve into a simple romance--which it never does. At its best it verges on deadpan and sports an understated, almost defeated sort of wit ("Although she knew there was nothing positively wild in how she was feeling about him, there was nothing negatively wild in it either. Definitely, she had no urge to run and scratch his face. Maybe if she had done, or shown her anger in any of the other ways she had planned, (he) would have felt better"). Throughout the novel(la?) the writing rings true and the characters are entirely believable. The book is not at all oppressed by references to contemporary African politics or conspicuous references to poverty and misery. All the actors are comfortably middle class and the real target of Aidoo's analysis is Africa's understanding of gender. I'll read another book of hers after this.
shawnd on LibraryThing 17 days ago
This is a novel of paradoxes, starting with the pace. The writing style makes it a very slow read, even for 150 or so pages, but the story itself progresses forward apace, even jumping ahead to relevant life events. The reader is drawn in to liking the main character, Esi, even though she herself is challenged with her decisions, and she gradually alienates or loses many around her. Continuing the paradox, the male characters, and in a feminist book no less, clearly are behaving in a negative way in a culture perpetuating and accepting their actions, yet the author brings to light attitudes and writing that makes them sympathetic. Overall, a thought provoking and challenging book that likely meets the author's goal, is troubling for the reader, but does not have a story or writing skill that makes it a must read.
meggyweg on LibraryThing 17 days ago
This had more of a plot than most of the African fiction I've read so far, but it moved pretty slowly for me. Basically the story is this: Esi, a high-earning statistician in Ghana, is having marital problems and the final straw is when her husband rapes her. She leaves him, falls in love with a Muslim guy named Ali, and becomes his mistress. Eventually Ali takes Esi as his second wife, but their relationship doesn't change -- he still only visits once in awhile before going "home" to his first wife and kids.You could classify this as feminist literature -- the three female characters in the story are all professional women who try, with varying degree of success, to juggle careers, husbands and kids in the face of their partners' indifference, envy and/or disdain. The women in this story would have a lot in common with Western women that way. Most people in the West don't imagine African women as having professional jobs like the characters in Changes do.I think the story was okay, and I certainly could understand and empathize with the characters. The author did an omniscient narrative very well -- sometimes those are hard to pull off. The story did sort of peter in the end without much of a conclusion, but I can easily to see real life turning out just the same way. I don't think I'll be looking to read other Ama Ata Aidoo books, but for people interested in African and/or women's fiction, this would be well worth a look.
ott on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Such a simple and heart-wrenching story, lyrically told
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed this book immensely... It truly hit home for me as a female. This book is like a mirror for the "modern:" woman (African or otherwise), it is the dilemma of balancing our responsibilities as females in a modern society (for which we have fought to participate) but which has now presented us with a new set of complications related to the work/career, family/marriage/love balance. This book was both confrontational and coaching... the words of wisdom throughout (from grandmother, mother and friend) are soberingly ralistic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This love story is a very entertaining dealing with lives of women in a changing African society. It mirrors the social and cultural diversity of Africans and the depth of the African psyche even in the modern world. I enjoyed this rich, well-written, challenging and fascinating story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This love story is a very entertaining dealing with lives of women in a changing African society. It mirrors the social and cultural diversity of Africans and the depth of the African psyche even in the modern world. I enjoyed this rich, well-written, challenging and fascinating story.