ISBN-10:
069101826X
ISBN-13:
9780691018263
Pub. Date:
06/21/1979
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 2): Aion: Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self / Edition 2

Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 2): Aion: Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self / Edition 2

by C. G. Jung
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780691018263
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 06/21/1979
Series: Collected Works of C.G. Jung , #26
Pages: 360
Sales rank: 342,194
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

  • FrontMatter, pg. i
  • EDITORIAL NOTE, pg. v
  • TRANSLATOR’S NOTE, pg. vi
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS, pg. vii
  • LIST OF PLATES, pg. viii
  • FOREWORD, pg. ix
  • I THE EGO, pg. 3
  • II THE SHADOW, pg. 8
  • III THE SYZYGY: ANIMA AND ANIMUS, pg. 11
  • IV THE SELF, pg. 23
  • V CHRIST, A SYMBOL OF THE SELF, pg. 36
  • VI THE SIGN OF THE FISHES, pg. 72
  • VII THE PROPHECIES OF NOSTRADAMUS, pg. 95
  • VIII THE HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FISH, pg. 103
  • IX THE AMBIVALENCE OF THE FISH SYMBOL, pg. 118
  • X THE FISH IN ALCHEMY, pg. 126
  • XI THE ALCHEMICAL INTERPRETATION OF THE FISH, pg. 154
  • XII BACKGROUND TO THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CHRISTIAN ALCHEMICAL SYMBOLISM, pg. 173
  • XIII GNOSTIC SYMBOLS OF THE SELF, pg. 184
  • XIV THE STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF THE SELF, pg. 222
  • XV CONCLUSION, pg. 266
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY, pg. 271
  • INDEX, pg. 301



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Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 2): Aion: Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self 2.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
P_S_Patrick on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This being the second part of volume 9 of the collected works, with the first part being the Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (the best of Jung's works I have read yet), I was expecting this to be a bit more exciting than it was. It is concerned mainly in analysing the historical archetypal projections of the self, which involves the usual Jungian delve into mythology, religion, alchemy, heresy, literature, etc. Which is interesting of course, but just more of the same of what we get in part I, an extension of his theory, albeit harder to understand and more detailed. That said, it is very difficult to find a book that contains quite as much expertly synthesised information from as many varied sources as this, and it is worth putting the extra effort in that comprehending it requires. Once the reader has finished the book, and understood it, then the entire world history of culture should seem both smaller and bigger at the same time, condensed and expanded, contextualised, and strangely almost inevitable or unavoidable, with everything being a variation, extension, or counter point of one of the transcendent themes that Jung has anatomised here (or in one of his other volumes). It puts the human mind in an analogous position to a stone being thrown into a lake, where the ripples are the history of human religious and superstitious thought, caused not by any will of the stone, but as a result of how the mind has been fashioned and propelled by higher forces, by the stream of evolution and time which smoothened it, and the hand of consciousness which propelled it. This isn't an easy book to read, but will be of general use to students of literature, history, theology, and anthropology, and though Jung isn't taught at undergrad level usually, it should be of interest to psychologists, though they would probably benefit more from some of the less opaque volumes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I consider myself a fairly large fan of Jung's work and while I'm no scholar, I have read a good portion of his collected works. That said, this book was a terrible disappointment. It was less about his psychological ideas and more about his (albeit impressively) encyclopedic knowledge of alchemy and other ancient religions. If you do happen to be looking for a comparative look at alchemy, Jewish mysticism and Egyptian religion, this would be an incredible book, but if you're looking for a book about psychology and Jung's own ideas you'll get little more out of reading the book than you will by reading the description on the back cover. Even the short chapters titled ego, shadow and anima and animus say less about those ideas then the other works in which he mentions them. Especially since part 1 of volume 9 brings up most of the ideas expanded upon ad nauseum in part 2, Aion is only worth reading as an intellectual curiousity and even just barely that.