ISBN-10:
184821331X
ISBN-13:
9781848213319
Pub. Date:
02/01/2012
Publisher:
Wiley
Control of Non-conventional Synchronous Motors / Edition 1

Control of Non-conventional Synchronous Motors / Edition 1

by Jean-Paul Louis

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781848213319
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 02/01/2012
Series: ISTE Series , #597
Pages: 416
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Jean-Paul Louis is Emeritus Professor at ENS Cachan, and is an associate editor of the European Journal of Electrical Engineering (Hermes).

Table of Contents

Introduction Jean-Paul Louis xi

Chapter 1 Self-controlled Synchronous Motor: Principles of Function and Simplified Control Model Francis Labrique Francois Baudart 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Design aspects specific to the self-controlled synchronous machine 2

1.3 Simplified model for the study of steady state operation 3

1.4 Study of steady-state operation 6

1.5 Operation at nominal speed, voltage and current 12

1.6 Operation with a torque smaller man the nominal torque 15

1.7 Operation with a speed below the nominal speed 15

1.8 Running as a generator 16

1.9 Equivalence of a machine with a commutator and brushes 17

1.10 Equations inferred from the theory of circuits with sliding contacts 22

1.11 Evaluation of alternating currents circulating in steady state in the damper windings 26

1.12 Transposition of the study to the case of a negative rotational speed 28

1.13 Variant of the base assembly 28

1.14 Conclusion 29

1.15 List of the main symbols used 29

1.16 Bibliography 30

Chapter 2 Self-controlled Synchronous Motor: Dynamic Model Including the Behavior of Damper Windings and Commutation Overlap Ernest Matage 33

2.1 Introduction 33

2.2 Choice of the expression of Nk 35

2.3 Expression of fluxes 40

2.4 General properties of coefficients <X>,<Y> and <Z> 46

2.5 Electrical dynamic equations 48

2.6 Expression of electromechanical variables 51

2.7 Expression of torque 53

2.8 Writing of equations in terms of coenergy 54

2.9 Application to control 56

2.10 Conclusion 60

2.11 Appendix 1: value of coefficients <X>,<Y> and <Z> 60

2.12 Appendix 2: derivatives of coefficients <X>, <Y> and <Z> 61

2.13 Appendix 3: simplifications for small μ 62

2.14 Appendix 4: List of the main symbols used in Chapters 1 and 2 63

2.15 Bibliography 65

Chapter 3 Synchronous Machines in Degraded Mode Damien Flieller Ngac Ky Nguyrn Hervé Schwab Guy Sturtzer 67

3.1 General introduction 67

3.1.1 Analysis of failures of the set converter-machine: converters with Mosfet transistors 68

3.2 Analysis of the main causes of failure 68

3.2.1 Failure of the inverter 68

3.2.2 Other failures 72

3.3 Reliability of a permanent magnet synchronous motors drive 72

3.3.1 Environmental conditions in the motor industry 72

3.3.2 The two reliability reports: MIL-HdbK-217 and RDF2000 73

3.3.3 Failure rate of permanent magnet synchronous motors actuators 75

3.4 Conclusion 76

3.5 Optimal supplies of permanent magnet synchronous machines in the presence of faults 77

3.5.1 Introduction: the problem of a-b-c controls 77

3.6 Supplies of faulty synchronous machines with non-sinusoidal back electromagnetic force 77

3.6.1 Generalization of the modeling 77

3.6.2 A heuristic approach to the solution 80

3.6.3 First optimization of ohmic losses without constraint on the homopolar current 82

3.6.4 Second optimization of ohmic losses with the sum of currents of non-faulty phases being zero 91

3.6.5 Third optimization of ohmic losses with a homopolar current of zero in all phases 96

3.6.6 Global formulations 102

3.7 Experimental learning strategy in closed loop to obtain optimal currents in all cases 113

3.8 Simulation results 116

3.9 General conclusion 118

3.10 Glossary 119

3.11 Bibliography 121

Chapter 4 Control of the Double-star Synchronous Machine Supplied by PWM Inverters Mohamed Fouad Benkhoris 125

4.1 Introduction 125

4.2 Description of the electrical actuator 127

4.3 Basic equations 128

4.3.1 Voltage equations 128

4.3.2 Equation of the electromagnetic torque 131

4.4 Dynamic models of the double-star synchronous machine 131

4.4.1 Dynamic model in referential d1q1d2q2 131

4.4.2 Dynamic model in referential dqz1z2z3z4 136

4.5 Control of the double-star synchronous machine 146

4.5.1 Control in referential d1q1d2q2 147

4.5.2 Control in referential dqz1z2z3z4 156

4.6 Bibliography 158

Chapter 5 Vectorial Modeling and Control of Multiphase Machines with Non-salient Poles Supplied by an Inverter Xavier Kestelyn Eric Semail 161

5.1 Introduction and presentation of the electrical machines 161

5.2 Control model of inverter-fed permanent magnet synchronous machines 163

5.2.1 Characteristic spaces and generalization of the notion of an equivalent two-phase machine 163

5.2.2 The inverter seen from the machine 182

5.3 Torque control of multiphase machines 189

5.3.1 Control of currents in the natural basis 189

5.3.2 Control of currents in a decoupling basis 193

5.4 Modeling and torque control of multiphase machines in degraded supply mode 203

5.4.1 Modeling of a machine with a supply defect 203

5.4.2 Torque control of a faulty machine 203

5.5 Bibliography 204

Chapter 6 Hybrid Excitation Synchronous Machines Nicolas Patin Linonel Vido 207

6.1 Description 207

6.1.1 Definition 207

6.1.2 Classification 208

6.2 Modeling with the aim of control 220

6.2.1 Setting up equations 220

6.2.2 Formulation in components 224

6.2.3 Complete model 228

6.3 Control by model inversion 230

6.3.1 Aims of the torque control 230

6.3.2 Current control of the machine 231

6.3.3 Optimization and current inputs 233

6.4 Overspeed and flux weakening of synchronous machines 235

6.4.1 Generalities 235

6.4.2 Flux weakening of synchronous machines with classical magnets 236

6.4.3 The unified approach to flux weakening using "optimal inputs" 237

6.4 Conclusion 237

6.5 Bibliography 239

Chapter 7 Advanced Control of the Linear Synchronous Motor Ghislain Remy Pierre-Jean Barre 241

7.1 Introduction 241

7.1.1 Historical review and applications in the field of linear motors 241

7.1.2 Presentation of linear synchronous motors 243

7.1.3 Technology of linear synchronous motors 245

7.1.4 Linear motor models using sinusoidal magneto-motive force assumption 246

7.1.5 Causal ordering graph representation 248

7.1.6 Advanced modeling of linear synchronous motors 249

7.2 Classical control of linear motors 253

7.2.1 State-of-the-art in linear motor controls 253

7.2.2 Control structure design using the COG inversion principles 255

7.2.3 Closed-loop control 256

7.3 Advanced control of linear motors 265

7.3.1 Multiple resonant controllers in a two-phase reference frame 265

7.3.2 Feed-forward control for the compensation of detent forces 271

7.3.3 Commands by nth derivative for sensorless control 273

7.4 Conclusion 279

7.5 Nomenclature 280

7.6 Acknowledgment 281

7.7 Bibliography 281

7.8 Appendix: LMD10-050 Datasheet of ETEL 285

Chapter 8 Variable Reluctance Machines: Modeling and Control Mickael HlLalret Thierry Lubin Abdelmounaïm Tounzi 287

8.1 Introduction 287

8.2 Synchronous reluctance machines 289

8.2.1 Description and operating principle 289

8.2.2 Hypotheses and model of a Synchrel machine 291

8.2.3 Control of the Synchrel machine 293

8.2.4 Applications 303

8.3 Switched reluctance machines 303

8.3.1 Description and principle of operation 303

8.3.2 Hypotheses and direct model of the SRM 307

8.3.3 Control 310

8.3.4 Applications 321

8.4 Conclusion 323

8.5 Bibliography 323

Chapter 9 Control of the Stepping Motor Bruno Robert Moez Feki 239

9.1 Introduction 329

9.2 Modeling 329

9.2.1 Main technologies 329

9.2.2 The modeling hypotheses 330

9.2.3 The model 332

9.3 Control in open loop 335

9.3.1 The types of supply

9.3 Control in open loop 335

9.3.2 Case of slow movement 339

9.3.4 Case of quick movement 344

9.4 Controls in closed loop 350

9.4.1 Linear models 350

9.4.2 Servo-control of speed 357

9.5 Advanced control: the control of chaos 361

9.5.1 Chaotic behavior 361

9.5.2 The model 361

9.5.3 Orbit stabilization 363

9.5.4 Absolute stability 365

9.5.5 Synthesis of the controller 366

9.5.6 Examples 368

9.6 Bibliography 371

Chapter 10 Control of Piezoelectric Actuators Frédéric Giraud Betty Lemaire-Semail 375

10 Introduction 375

10.1.1 Traveling wave ultrasonic motors: technology and usage 375

10.1.2 Functioning features 377

10.1.3 Models 378

10.2 Causal model in the supplied voltage referential 380

10.2.1 Hypotheses and notations 380

10.2.2 Kinematics of the ideal rotor 381

10.2.3 Generation of the motor torque 385

10.2.4 Stator's resonance 386

10.2.5 Calculation of modal reaction forces 387

10.2.6 Complete model 388

10.3 Causal model in the referential of the traveling wave 389

10.3.1 Park transform applied to the traveling wave motor 389

10.3.2 Transformed model 391

10.3.3 Study of the motor stall 394

10.3.4 Validation of the model 396

10.3.5 Torque estimator 398

10.4 Control based on a behavioral model 400

10.5 Controls based on a knowledge model 401

10.5.1 Inversion principle 402

10.5.2 Control structure inferred from the causal model: emphasis on self-control 402

10.5.3 Practical carrying out of self-control 406

10.6 Conclusion 407

10.7 Bibliography 407

List of Authors 411

Index 413

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