Couldn't Keep It to Myself: Testimonies from Our Imprisoned Sisters

Couldn't Keep It to Myself: Testimonies from Our Imprisoned Sisters

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Couldn't Keep It to Myself: Testimonies from Our Imprisoned Sisters 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of Wally Lamb's, and bought this book because his name was attached to it. I was not at all disappointed, and absolutely loved this book! Each story was heart-wrenching, superbly written and truly engaging. I found myself inspired by all of the women whose stories were featured in the book. I admire their strength and the courage it took to put their stories in writing! Often when I'm feeling down and sorry for myself, I think of these women and the pain and anguish they were forced to endure for most of their lives. Believe me, it is a bonafide cure for self pity. This book is truly excellent, and without question, highly recommended to everyone!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I did not know if I would like this book. I'm not going to lie; I bought it only because Wally Lamb's name was on the cover. I knew he didn't write the book himself but I also knew that he wouldn't take part in something he didn't believe in or think was worthy. As you read this book, you can't help but feel so much sympathy for these women. Yes they are in prison and yes they killed and stole but their life before prison is so awful. In my opionion, some of their crimes were justified and they shouldn't even be in prison. This book gives you an inside look on how awful prison is and how so many of the prison employees treat you like an animal. My heart reached out to each and every one of these women, especially Diane who sadly has passed away. Not only is the book insightful, these women are really excellent authors. This isn't a book like She's Come Undone where you can read it in one day. I found myself only being able to read one story every few days because it really made me think about how lucky I was to have the childhood I did and the family I have. These stories are heart breaking but hopefully for these women, by writing their stories, something they kept inside for so long was able to be brought to the surface and they were able to conquer their fears and overcome their past as best they could.
Guest More than 1 year ago
These stories are beautifully written. I got caught up in so many of the stories that I didn't want them end. I truly loved this book because it changed my conception of prisoners in general. It is no wonder why a lot of these women end up incarcerated-they have all led hard lives. I recommend this book to everyone. Spread the word and let's make this book a bestseller!
Guest More than 1 year ago
A noble effort by Wally Lamb to spend time at York helping the inmates in a writing workshop. The stories were incredibly sad but instead of feeling hopeful like some of the reviewers said, I felt like the circle of violence and crime that started in most of the women's lives went on because they wound up in prison. This book should be given to high school girls to show what can happen when you take certain actions. An interesting read but actually pretty depressing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i loved this book i just finished it the other day and was amazed by all the diffrent stories and lifestyles of all these women that all ended up in the same place. However some parts where a little gorey, and it disturbed me how many of the girls were sexually abused, but it was a great book mainly because the women bring you right into thier lives and tell you everything nothing seemed held back, i would encourage all the women to keep writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I could not put this book down. I hope Wally Lamb does this again!
Guest More than 1 year ago
couldn't put it down! We need to see what good talents people have weather being convicted of something, or just trying to find there way.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book should be a must read for anyone dealing with people in prisons...it illustrates how childhoods and teen years full of sexual abuse create criminals...how abuse of any kind perpetrated on a child sends all of society spinning out of control...this is a very thought provoking read as are all of Wally Lamb's books...can't wait for the next one...
Guest More than 1 year ago
In agreeing to lead a writing workshop for these women in prison, Wally Lamb helped them find and refine their literary voice. Because of his efforts and their bravery, we 'outsiders' now can peer into a slice of reality known only to these women, and to a certain extent we can experience it with them and perhaps divide their sorrows. These ladies are in prison because they committed crimes, but they are also in prison because others committed crimes against them. May we all learn from their experiences and gain compassion and understanding for their position in life, past and present.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I must say, each book that Mr. Lamb writes brings a new degree of thought to me. I was amazed at the stories that at one point or another related to something known and unknown to me. I believe that each of the Women in this book has lived a much more intense life than is protrayed. I felt a part of this intensity in each story. An intensity that made me stop, catch my breath and look away from the pages to focus on what my mind was thinking and my heart was feeling. Then starting back into the words to see if the answer would be on the next page. To me, this is great writing. Mr. Lamb, I can't figure out your true motive for writing this book but I know that I will pass this book around and wait in high anticipation to the conversations that will arise from each person that is touched by this book. If you want to read a book that will make you look at your life and realize, it is worth so much more than all the senseless grief we bring upon our own being. This is the book to read. Read with a warm heart and an open mind and you too will see it, feel it and remember it. As much as I anticipate Mr. Lamb's next creation, his last one holds onto me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I kind of had a head start on the book I read it about a year and a half ago. my mother was one of the woman who contributed to the writing of this book(Carolyn Adams Goodwin). i learned alot about my mother when i read this book, I'm a little more aware of the reason she comitted the crimes she did, and why she always spoiled me so much, I highly recommend this book , not because my mom wrote in it , but to better understand reasons people do things. there are alot of heart breaking, funny ,and joyful stories in this book. well anyways thanks for your time Bryant adams
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smarterthanilook More than 1 year ago
this would be a great book club choice and a wake -up call for teens. Page after page reflects the consequences of poor choice, lack of education and weak family support. Kept my attention throughout
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modestindecisiv More than 1 year ago
As a Mental Health Professional, a psychology student, a feminist, a health educator and just as a plain ole person, I absolutely loved this book. It creates an insight to a reality that many people are unaware of. Wally Lamb did excellent job working with these miraculous women in prison. Most people in prison, men and women alike are in for nonviolent crimes. In the case of women, many were abused physically, verbally, or sexually sometime before entering the "correctional" system. Their stories are inspiring, sad,and above all they need to be heard. Women in situations like theirs had no way out or knew of no way out. I highly recommend this book to feminists, health educators, psychology students, and those who are just interested in the topic. This book is a collection of works by women in correctional facilities (prison). Great book for older adolescents (16+) and for students. I might even recommend this to a class of students to read (college level). For those who enjoy this book and like the works of Eve Ensler, I recommend a documentary entitled, What I Want My Word To Do to You.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book brings to surface a side of life very few of us are familiar with or had any knowledge it existed. A social problem is exposed that must not be ignored by society and presented in a story like, true to life, informative piece of work. The stories touched me, the autor's innovative approach impressed me. I must say, some social backgrounds would not believe these conditions, feelings, hopes and goal's actually exist. But they do. Wally Lamb brings these to the surface in an almost shocking manner.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If it's by Wally Lamb you know you are in for a good read. His depth of character is unmatched. As always, he makes you feel you know these women and understand what brought them to the point of incarceration. Good study for psychology students. I also loved 'I Know This Much Is True' and 'She's Come Undone'.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a corrections counselor of many years experience who also was involved in college education in the prisons, I can testify to the value of writing workshops and published affirmations. Without being maudlin or self-serving, these incarcerated and fomerly incarcerated women look hard at the emotional issues that brought them and often keep them in prison. The level of honesty is inspiring as we recognize bits and pieces of ourselves and loved ones in these stories. A lot of healing takes place before our eyes as the (sometimes arbitrary) events unfold. I was particularly uplifted by one woman whose commitment to her religious tenets put her in a disciplinary confinement she thought would be intolerable. Her strength and enlightenment cannot help but touch us.
The realities of prison are different than the media often portray. This book glimpses the dull depersonalization that institutions offer and the ability to rise above a system that thrives on conformity based on expediency. I was impressed by the comprehension shown and the commitment to change. We can all benefit from this offering, not just the 1 in 100.