The Covenant (Abram's Daughters Series #1)

The Covenant (Abram's Daughters Series #1)

by Beverly Lewis

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Overview

A New Look for The Covenant

Abram's Daughters is the powerful saga of four sisters, their family and community, whose way of life and faith in God are as enduring as their signature horse and buggy. Or so it seems...Book One, The Covenant, unveils the layers of deeply rooted Amish tradition as seen through the eyes of Leah and Sadie Ebersol, the two oldest, courting-age sisters. The Amish community of Gobbler's Knob holds everything Leah Ebersol has ever desired until a pact with her sister Sadie, lured by the outside world, leaves Leah clinging to God's promises.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780764210860
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/01/2012
Series: Abram's Daughters Series , #1
Edition description: Repackaged Edition
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 248,182
Product dimensions: 8.20(w) x 5.50(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Beverly Lewis, born in the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country, has more than 17 million books in print. Her stories have been published in 11 languages and have regularly appeared on numerous bestseller lists, including the New York Times and USA Today. The Brethren won a 2007 Christy Award for excellence in Christian fiction. Beverly and her husband, David, live in Colorado, where they enjoy hiking, biking, making music, and spending time with their family. Learn more atwww.beverlylewis.com.

Read an Excerpt

After the noon meal Leah helped Sadie wash and dry each one of the kerosene lamp chimneys in the house. The glass tubes had been rather cloudy last evening during Bible reading and evening prayers, and Leah and Mamma had both noticed the light was too soft and misty because of it. Dat hadn't complained at all, though he did have to adjust his reading glasses repeatedly, scooting close to the lamp in the kitchen, where they'd all gathered just before twilight, the back door flung wide, along with all the windows, coaxing the slightest breeze into the warm house.

"We really oughta clean these every day," Leah said, handing one to Sadie for drying. "No sense Dat struggling to see the Good Book, jah?"

Sadie nodded halfheartedly.

"Are you going out again tonight?" Leah whispered.

Sadie's eyes gave a sharp warning. "Ach, not now ..."

Glancing over her shoulder, Leah saw that Mamma was dusting the furniture in the sunroom. "Cleanliness is next to godliness," Mamma liked to say constantly. Hannah and Mary Ruth had run outside to hose off the back porch and sidewalk.

"You'll break Mamma's heart if you're sneaking out with English boys, ya know," she said softly.

"How do you know what I'm doin'?"

"I saw you come home last night—saw what you were wearing, too." But before she could ask where on earth Sadie had gotten such a getup, Mamma returned, and that brought a quick end to their conversation.

Leah washed the rest of the chimneys, turning her thoughts to the Preaching service tomorrow. Will Gid single me out again before the common meal? she wondered. He had been more thanforthright with his intentions toward her before, though discreetly enough. Yet she knew he was counting the weeks till she was old enough to attend Sunday singings. And so was she, but for a far different reason. "I'll be first in line to ask you to ride home with me," he'd said to her out in the barnyard two Sundays ago, when it was her family's turn to have house church.

Speechless at the time, she wished the Lord might give her something both wise and kind to say. To put him off gently. But not one word had come to mind and she just stood there, fidgeting while the smithy's only son grinned down at her.

What she was really looking forward to was next Sunday—the off-Sunday between church meetings—when the People spent the day visiting relatives. Mamma was awful eager to go to Grasshopper Level and see the Mast cousins again. It had been several months.

Leah remembered precisely where she was standing in the barn when Dat had given her the news of the visit. Looking down, in the haymow, she'd stopped short, holding her pitchfork just so in front of her, half leaning on it while she willed her heart to slow its pace.

She smiled, fondly recalling the first time she'd ever talked with Jonas. The two of them had nearly missed out on supper, standing out in the milk house talking about birds, especially the colorful varieties that lived on Aunt Lizzie's side of the woods, near where the wild flowers grew. She had told him her favorite was the bluebird. Jonas had wholeheartedly agreed, his blue eyes searching hers. And for a moment, she nearly forgot he was three years older. He was Sadie's age. Yet, unlike any other boy, he seemed to know and understand her heart—who Leah truly was. Not a tomboy, but a real girl.

In all truth, she hadn't experienced such a thing with anyone ever in her life. Not with Sadie, for sure. And not so much with Mamma, though on rare occasions her mother had opened up a bit. Hannah and Mary Ruth had each other and were constantly whispering private conversations. Only with Aunt Lizzie and Adah Peachey, Gid's younger sister, could Leah share confidentially.

So she and Jonas had a special something between them, which was too bad. At least Mamma would think so if she knew, because young women weren't supposed to open up much to young men, unless, of course, they were being courted or were married.

Just now, Sadie glanced nervously toward the sunroom, where Mamma was still busy dusting. "Walk me to the outhouse," Sadie whispered to Leah.

"What for?"

"Never mind, just come." Sadie led the way, through the utility room and enclosed porch, then down the back steps, past the twins, who laughed as they worked.

Silently they walked, till Sadie said, turning quickly, "Listen, if ya must know, I think I'm falling in love."

"In love? Ach, Sadie, who with?"

"Shh! He lives down the road a ways. His name is Derry."

"So, I'm right then, a fancy boy." Leah wanted to turn around right now and head back to the house. She didn't want to hear another filthy word. "What's happened to you? English boys are big trouble. You oughta know from going to high school and all."

"You sound too much like Dat."

"Well, somebody's got to talk sense to you! Having a wild rumschpringe's one thing, Sadie, but whatever ya do, don't go outside the boundaries of the Ordnung."

Sadie's eyes were ablaze. "Say whatcha want, but zip your lip."

"Maybe I should tell."

Their eyes locked. Sadie leaned closer. "You have a secret, too, Leah."

"Are you threatening me?"

"Call it what you will, but if Mamma finds out about me, I'll know it came from you. And if you go and tell Mamma on me, I'll tell Dat on you. And if Dat finds out you hope to marry Jonas 'stead of Smithy Gid, he'll put a stop to it."

Leah's heart sank. Sadie had her, for sure.

Glaring at her, Sadie opened the door to the outhouse and hurried inside. The second Leah heard the door latch shut, she turned and fled for home.

After the noon meal Leah helped Sadie wash and dry each one of the kerosene lamp chimneys in the house. The glass tubes had been rather cloudy last evening during Bible reading and evening prayers, and Leah and Mamma had both noticed the light was too soft and misty because of it. Dat hadn't complained at all, though he did have to adjust his reading glasses repeatedly, scooting close to the lamp in the kitchen, where they'd all gathered just before twilight, the back door flung wide, along with all the windows, coaxing the slightest breeze into the warm house.

"We really oughta clean these every day," Leah said, handing one to Sadie for drying. "No sense Dat struggling to see the Good Book, jah?"

Sadie nodded halfheartedly.

"Are you going out again tonight?" Leah whispered.

Sadie's eyes gave a sharp warning. "Ach, not now ..."

Glancing over her shoulder, Leah saw that Mamma was dusting the furniture in the sunroom. "Cleanliness is next to godliness," Mamma liked to say constantly. Hannah and Mary Ruth had run outside to hose off the back porch and sidewalk.

"You'll break Mamma's heart if you're sneaking out with English boys, ya know," she said softly.

"How do you know what I'm doin'?"

"I saw you come home last night—saw what you were wearing, too." But before she could ask where on earth Sadie had gotten such a getup, Mamma returned, and that brought a quick end to their conversation.

Leah washed the rest of the chimneys, turning her thoughts to the Preaching service tomorrow. Will Gid single me out again before the common meal? she wondered. He had been more than forthright with his intentions toward her before, though discreetly enough. Yet she knew he was counting the weeks till she was old enough to attend Sunday singings. And so was she, but for a far different reason. "I'll be first in line to ask you to ride home with me," he'd said to her out in the barnyard two Sundays ago, when it was her family's turn to have house church.

Speechless at the time, she wished the Lord might give her something both wise and kind to say. To put him off gently. But not one word had come to mind and she just stood there, fidgeting while the smithy's only son grinned down at her.

What she was really looking forward to was next Sunday—the off-Sunday between church meetings—when the People spent the day visiting relatives. Mamma was awful eager to go to Grasshopper Level and see the Mast cousins again. It had been several months.

Leah remembered precisely where she was standing in the barn when Dat had given her the news of the visit. Looking down, in the haymow, she'd stopped short, holding her pitchfork just so in front of her, half leaning on it while she willed her heart to slow its pace.

She smiled, fondly recalling the first time she'd ever talked with Jonas. The two of them had nearly missed out on supper, standing out in the milk house talking about birds, especially the colorful varieties that lived on Aunt Lizzie's side of the woods, near where the wild flowers grew. She had told him her favorite was the bluebird. Jonas had wholeheartedly agreed, his blue eyes searching hers. And for a moment, she nearly forgot he was three years older. He was Sadie's age. Yet, unlike any other boy, he seemed to know and understand her heart—who Leah truly was. Not a tomboy, but a real girl.

In all truth, she hadn't experienced such a thing with anyone ever in her life. Not with Sadie, for sure. And not so much with Mamma, though on rare occasions her mother had opened up a bit. Hannah and Mary Ruth had each other and were constantly whispering private conversations. Only with Aunt Lizzie and Adah Peachey, Gid's younger sister, could Leah share confidentially.

So she and Jonas had a special something between them, which was too bad. At least Mamma would think so if she knew, because young women weren't supposed to open up much to young men, unless, of course, they were being courted or were married.

Just now, Sadie glanced nervously toward the sunroom, where Mamma was still busy dusting. "Walk me to the outhouse," Sadie whispered to Leah.

"What for?"

"Never mind, just come." Sadie led the way, through the utility room and enclosed porch, then down the back steps, past the twins, who laughed as they worked.

Silently they walked, till Sadie said, turning quickly, "Listen, if ya must know, I think I'm falling in love."

"In love? Ach, Sadie, who with?"

"Shh! He lives down the road a ways. His name is Derry."

"So, I'm right then, a fancy boy." Leah wanted to turn around right now and head back to the house. She didn't want to hear another filthy word. "What's happened to you? English boys are big trouble. You oughta know from going to high school and all."

"You sound too much like Dat."

"Well, somebody's got to talk sense to you! Having a wild rumschpringe's one thing, Sadie, but whatever ya do, don't go outside the boundaries of the Ordnung."

Sadie's eyes were ablaze. "Say whatcha want, but zip your lip."

"Maybe I should tell."

Their eyes locked. Sadie leaned closer. "You have a secret, too, Leah."

"Are you threatening me?"

"Call it what you will, but if Mamma finds out about me, I'll know it came from you. And if you go and tell Mamma on me, I'll tell Dat on you. And if Dat finds out you hope to marry Jonas 'stead of Smithy Gid, he'll put a stop to it."

Leah's heart sank. Sadie had her, for sure.

Glaring at her, Sadie opened the door to the outhouse and hurried inside. The second Leah heard the door latch shut, she turned and fled for home.

Excerpted from:
The Covenant (ABRAM'S DAUGHTERS) by Beverly Lewis
Copyright © 2002, Beverly Lewis
Published by Bethany House Publishers
Used by permission. Unauthorized duplication prohibited.

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The Covenant (Abram's Daughters Series #1) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 201 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book started out a little "dry" for me but quickly picked-up my interest by the 3rd or 4th chapter. It kept me wanting to know what was going to happen next. The Amish have always interested me as I grew up in Harrisburg PA and have encountered the Amish several times throughout my life. I admire their complete and total devotion to their way of life. Now reading The Betrayal and hate to put my nook down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this first book in the series ... so much so that I'm now over half-way finished with the second book! I can't wait to find out what happens next! My only problem is with the formatting on the e-book; there needs to be more space between paragraphs where there is a change of character. Many times I would be confused when the point-of-view would jump to another scene or character with no break or warning, and I would have to go back and re-read that section. I am assuming this is only a problem with the e-book version because I find it hard to believe this error would have gotten past the editor. There were no other errors as far as I could tell. Thankfully, this problem does not occur in the second book!
TammyK1 More than 1 year ago
I was hooked on this series with this book. Definitely had to read them all. Very good!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent storyline. The story weaves together the characters' lives, and the ending keeps us excited about the next book. Nothing is predictable in this story, which is great. Lewis is an excellent writer who knows how to pull in her readers.
MsDestne61 More than 1 year ago
I was truly blessed by this book. Being a "preacher's kid" I could relate to so many aspects of the character's thoughts and actions.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well written, BUT no resolution for the main plot points. I enjoyed the character development for the most part, although I thought the descriptions of the oldest daughter, Sadie, to be lacking in depth. I have no problems with a book leaving some items to be resolved in future stories, but this book seems to build to an anti-climax. We don't know what will happen with either of the two daughters around whom the story centers. I expect at least a little resolution after I have invested some hours in reading a book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It took me a couple chapters to understand the flow but now i have to read them all
bmh001 More than 1 year ago
I tried on several occasions to read this book, but just could not get interested. I had just read several books about the Amish way of life and loved them, but could not get into this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was disappointed in this book. I have read several of miss lewis' books and this one failed to capture my interest. It dragged on so, then when the ending came i kept looking for more pages. It jyst stopped. Very disappointed.
countryreader More than 1 year ago
I love these books, a great series. I could read these books again. Great Author, I have ready many of her books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This, the first of five books in the series of Abram's Daughters, will involve and sufficiently entice a reader to complete all five books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved the covenant,it was the best book I've ever read. I got it at my school library, they do not have the other three so I am asking my parents for them as a christmas gift. I cannot wait to finish reading these books...until I get the books I will keep reading the covenant over-and -over.thats how much i like them.they're the best!
sdbookhound on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Beverly Lewis does not disappoint with this first installment in the Abram's Daughters series. Although it is similar to other writers of this type of Christian fiction, Beverly Lewis' books are just a cut above the rest. I enjoyed this book as well as the rest of the series very much.
bookishjoxer on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was well written. Reading about an Amish Family (A very Traditional one at that) was interesting. Learning a little about their lives and what they do is sort of neat.
angela1984 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is outside the realm of the types of books I usually read, but it is a very good book, nonetheless! It transports me into a world and belief system very different from my own, which is very relaxing. While this book has quite a bit of spirituality blended in, it is mainly a story about love and family.
readercat419 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up at a thrift store because i thought it looked interesting. It sat on my book shelf for almost a year, until I started going through my books looking for something good to read. By the time i got through the first few pages, I was hooked. I read this book nonstop when i had the chance, and finished it in just over a day. The drama that occurs in this book is very taboo, which makes it an even better read. I live in Pennsylvania and have always interacted with Amish. I am fascinated by their lifestyle, and Beverly Lewis gave me a chance to understand some of how Amish live on a daily basis. After I finished The Covenant, I ran to the nearest bookstore and bought the next book in the series, which is The Betrayal. That is how it was every other night or so when I would finish the next book, I would be so deeply into the lives of these characters that I simply couldn't wait to find out what happened next. The Covenant is easily nbhone of the best books that I have ever read.
KnottyCarla on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Loved it! Couldn't put it down. My heart went out to the girls. Started on the second book right after I finnished book 1 - I needed to know how the girls were coping. I felt as though I was with them on their farm and at one with their grief.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This novel sets the stage for a sequel. The author weaves a complicated story line full of interesting family drama combined with wit, wisdom , and a nice dose of Gods good solid values. I look forward to following the saga of Leah and Sadie and their sisters into the next generation.
SarahJo4110 More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You people should just read this novel yourselves and write your own review on this novel. I really enjoyed reading this novel very much. ShelleyMA
CinB More than 1 year ago
Well written and an emotional read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Disappointed in this well known author. Same old theme of Amish maid pinning for an English gentleman. I'm ready for something more imaginative. The reader who enjoys sinning and being naughty would like this one.