Coyote Blue

Coyote Blue

by Christopher Moore

Paperback(Reprint)

$14.40 $16.00 Save 10% Current price is $14.4, Original price is $16. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Want it by Monday, September 24?   Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Shipping at checkout.
    Same Day shipping in Manhattan. 
    See Details

Overview

Coyote Blue by Christopher Moore

From master of subversive humor Christopher Moore comes a quirky, irreverent novel of love, myth, metaphysics, outlaw biking, angst, and outrageous redemption.

As a boy, he was Samson Hunts Alone—until a deadly misunderstanding with the law forced him to flee the Crow reservation at age fifteen. Today he is Samuel Hunter, a successful Santa Barbara insurance salesman with a Mercedes, a condo, and a hollow, invented life. Then one day, destiny offers him the dangerous gift of love—in the exquisite form of Calliope Kincaid—and a curse in the unheralded appearance of an ancient god by the name of Coyote. Coyote, the trickster, has arrived to reawaken the mystical storyteller within Sam...and to seriously screw up his existence in the process.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416558477
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 03/18/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 236,225
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.43(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Christopher Moore is the bestselling author of You Suck, A Dirty Job, The Stupidest Angel, Fluke, Lamb, The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, Island of the Sequined Love Nun, Bloodsucking Fiends, and Practical Demonkeeping. Visit the
official Christopher Moore website at www.chrismoore.com.

Hometown:

Hawaii and San Francisco, California

Date of Birth:

August 5, 1958

Place of Birth:

Toledo, Ohio

What People are Saying About This

Patti Davis

If Carlos Castenada had created his Don Juan with a greater sense of humor, the result would have been Coyote. A fascinating trip.

Reading Group Guide

Coyote Blue

Christopher Moore

Description

Part love story, part vision quest, and always somewhat wacky, Coyote Blue tells the story of Sam Hunter – born Samson Hunts Alone on a Crow Indian Reservation, but reinvents himself as a successful insurance broker, until he is hit with the lightning bolt of love that goes by the name of Calliope. However, as with all Christopher Moore novels, there is something… weird… afoot, and that comes in the form of Old Man Coyote, an ancient Indian god famous for his abilities as a trickster, who leads Sam into more trouble than he can imagine, but also helps him find his way home.

Questions and Topics for Discussion

1. Sam Hunter was initially known as Samson Hunts Alone. What does his name represent? What about the other names in the novel? Is Moore telling us more with the naming? What Indian/Native American name would you select for yourself and why? What do you think describes you best?

2. In ancient Greek and Roman mythology Calliope was the Muse that was associated with creativity, music, artistic expression, and epic poetry. Why name the main female character that name? In what ways did Calliope inspire Sam? Lead him on a journey?

3. Old-Man Coyote, or The Coyote is also known as a Trickster, who can alternately be scandalous, disgusting, amusing, and disruptive, but can also be a creative force in peoples lives, transforming their worlds in bizarre and outrageous ways. Why do you think The Coyote comes into Sam’s life when he does, and are all of the changes he makes for the better?

4. Discuss morality in the course of the book. After The Coyote has disrupted Sam’s life, he goes about “making things right” in various way, for instance by getting Sam’s home back by breaking Josh Spagnola’s legs and helping to blackmail Aaron Aaron. Is he really doing right to Sam by doing wrong to others?

5. Sam doesn’t drink because he fears the stereotype of the “drunken Indian” that he has left behind on the Crow Reservation. Discuss stereotypes and how grounded they are in reality. What other “stock” characters are represented in the book? How closely do they lie to their stereotypes?

6. Religion and faith weave itself into the book in many different ways from Indian/Native American mysticism, Egyptian mythology to various eastern religions. Discuss faith as it relates to the characters in the book.

7. When Aaron is teaching Sam the various tricks of the insurance game he tells him to “remember the three m’s: mesmerize, motivate, and manipulate” because you’re not selling a need, but rather a dream. How does Sam react to this? What does this say about his character?

8. Discuss the idea of communities serving as extended families, which is something stressed in the book about the Crow tribe? Discuss other examples of the “it takes a village”idea.

9. Chart Sam’s course from denying his heritage to “finding his way home.” Identify and discuss key points in the book that mark a turning point in Sam’s journey.

10. Which main character did you get the most “attached” to in the book? Sam? Old Coyote? Why? What qualities of this character make them endearing to you?

Tips to Enhance Your Bookclub

    1. Imagine leaving the life that you grew up with and creating an entirely different persona for yourself as Sam did. What would you change about yourself, where would you go? What new profession would you choose
    2. In many Native American cultures, when you enter the spirit world, you can be reincarnated as some new being. Do you believe in reincarnation? If so, what would you like to return as? Why? Learn more about reincarnation at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reincarnatio
    3. Learn more about Christopher Moore and his other works at: http://www.chrismoore.com/

Introduction

Part love story, part vision quest, and always somewhat wacky, Coyote Blue tells the story of Sam Hunter — born Samson Hunts Alone on a Crow Indian Reservation, but who reinvents himself as a successful insurance broker, until he is hit with the lightning bolt of love that goes by the name of Calliope. However, as with all Christopher Moore novels, there is something...weird...afoot, and that comes in the form of Old Man Coyote, an ancient Indian god famous for his abilities as a trickster, who leads Sam into more trouble than he can imagine, but also helps him find his way home.

Questions for Discussion:

1. Sam Hunter was initially known as Samson Hunts Alone. What does his name represent? What about the other names in the novel? Is Moore telling us more with the naming? What Indian/Native American name would you select for yourself and why? What do you think describes you best?

2. In ancient Greek and Roman mythology Calliope was the Muse that was associated with creativity, music, artistic expression, and epic poetry. Why name the main female character that name? In what ways did Calliope inspire Sam? How did she lead him on a journey?

3. "Old Man Coyote," or "Coyote," is also known as the Trickster, who can alternately be scandalous, disgusting, amusing, and disruptive, but can also be a creative force in people's lives, transforming their worlds in bizarre and outrageous ways. Why do you think the Coyote comes into Sam's life when he does, and are all the changes he makes for the better?

4. Discuss morality in the course of the book. After the Coyote has disrupted Sam's life, he goes about "making things right" in various ways — for instance, bygetting Sam's home back by breaking Josh Spagnola's legs and helping to blackmail Aaron Aaron. Is he really doing right to Sam by doing wrong to others?

5. Sam doesn't drink because he fears the stereotype of the "drunken Indian" that he has left behind on the Crow Reservation. Discuss stereotypes and how grounded they are in reality. What other "stock" characters are represented in the book? How close are they to their stereotypes?

6. Religion and faith weave themselves into the book in many different ways from Indian/Native American mysticism, Egyptian mythology, to various eastern religions. Discuss faith as it relates to the characters in the book.

7. When Aaron is teaching Sam the various tricks of the insurance game, he tells him to "remember the three m's: mesmerize, motivate, and manipulate" because you're not selling a need, but rather a dream. How does Sam react to this? What does this say about his character?

8. Discuss the idea of communities serving as extended families, which is something stressed in the book about the Crow tribe. Discuss other examples of the "it takes a village" idea.

9. Chart Sam's course from denying his heritage to "finding his way home." Identify and discuss key points in the book that mark a turning point in Sam's journey.

10. Which main character did you get the most "attached" to in the book? Sam? Coyote? Why? What qualities of this character make them endearing to you?

Enhancing Your Book Club:

1. Imagine leaving the life that you grew up with and creating an entirely different persona for yourself, as Sam did. What would you change about yourself, where would you go? What new profession would you choose?

2. In many Native American cultures, when you enter the Spirit World, you can be reincarnated as some new being. Do you believe in reincarnation? If so, what would you like to return as? Why? Learn more about reincarnation at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reincarnation.

3. Learn more about Christopher Moore and his other works at www.chrismoore.com/.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Coyote Blue 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 116 reviews.
JgleJne More than 1 year ago
Loved this book...very entertaining and funny! i could not stop reading once i started....Loved the characters and how they interacted with each other...i started reading another of his books right after this one...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a light hearted, fun read that is hard to put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first Christopher Moore novel I read, and it led me to become a huge fan of this author. Moore takes the standard 'normal, boring guy falls in love and turns his life upside-down' story and makes it fresh, incredibly entertaining, and fun. Don't be deterred if you're not a fan of fantasy novels (the talking coyote could just as easily be the 'crazy best friend' character in any other novel), because the concept of shedding a false persona to find true self-realization should appeal to fans of any genre. Robert H. Goretsky Hoboken, NJ
Guest More than 1 year ago
...but still very entertaining. I found it a bit dry at times, but only in comparison to his other novels. Still holds true to Moore's craziness!
Go4Jugular 4 months ago
This is Christopher Moore's second novel and, though it's not on par with the best of his later work, it is a solid foundation upon which his inimitable style builds. In my opinion, a synopsis isn't necessary (that's why books have back covers and dust jackets); what is essential to know is that if you like the rapid pace of Moore's plotting, witty dialogue with frequent clever turns of phrase, the occasional supernatural being showing up to influence human events, and a plot that will, by the end, pull together all the seeming narrative detours, you'll thoroughly enjoy this book. Bonus for those who have read, or will read, other Moore novels is the appearance of characters recurring in later tales, such as Detective Rivera and, especially, Minty Fresh.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Christopher Moore has a great story telling mind. Blending the myths, legends, and a speck of history make the stories relateble. Crossing ancient Egyptian and Crow myths takes a twist that one dosen't expect. Coyote Blue was very enjoyable read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the worst books I've ever read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Crytal More than 1 year ago
This one just didn't do it for me. For some reason it felt more like a Hiaasen than Christopher Moore to me. There were a few funny parts, and it took me until chapter 26 to realize there was a cross-over character. So not all bad, but also not very good. At least for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Christopher Moore does it again. One of his best books, funny, intelligent, and imaginative.
dingy_btch More than 1 year ago
One of my favorite Christopher Moore books, ever. He is awesome!
Zero0 More than 1 year ago
While I am loving all of Moores novels I've read so far I was mostly unimpressed with this one.  The story line is constantly shifting into very unrelated themes, while there is one or two very funny laugh out loud moments I found this novel over all shifting from one place to another or the later building up a plot to end abruptly.  The ending made little sense and was overall disappointing.  I found myself forcing through the second half really wondering where the novel is going.  Not a great read for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
C.M. writes a fun story that is quickly read and not easily put down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sean_From_OHIO More than 1 year ago
Coyote Blue is the exact kind of book that you would expect from Christopher Moore. Hilarious with drama and enough touching scenes to keep it relatively grounded. The story involves a member of the Crow Indian reservation who moves on in life without his tribe and their beliefs and is pulled back in by the ridiculously funny trickster god, Coyote. All the characters in this book had some aspect of themselves that were unique enough to be original but still not too bizarre. Christopher Moore is the best comedic writer alive! Great stuff!
BigLazyTomcat More than 1 year ago
This is a fantastic and entertaining take on the Trickster. If this is your first book by this author, you won't be disappointed. So far, I can recommend any book I've read by Christopher Moore. I would recommend his books to any adult who enjoys a fun read.
KanakaLele More than 1 year ago
I like Christopher Moore, I really do. Lamb is one of my all-time favorite books. His vampire-based stories are great reads. Maybe it's something about the SoCal theme, but coyote Blue just doesn't do it for me the same as some of his others. It's a random read and it keeps you wondering what next, but it's not his best work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago