Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services / Edition 5

Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services / Edition 5

by Jerry V. Diller
1.8 5
ISBN-10:
1285075404
ISBN-13:
9781285075402
Pub. Date:
01/01/2014
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
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Overview

Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services / Edition 5

CULTURAL DIVERSITY: A PRIMER FOR THE HUMAN SERVICES, Fifth Edition, provides the tools you need to become a successful and effective counselor. This innovative book covers a variety of topics, ranging from the general principles of cultural diversity to how to work with clients from various cultures. It's an ideal resource to prepare you for a successful career in counseling.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781285075402
Publisher: Cengage Learning
Publication date: 01/01/2014
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 185,831
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction. 2. What It Means to Be Culturally Competent. 3. Working with Culturally Diverse Clients. 4. Understanding Racism, Prejudice, and White Privilege. 5. Understanding Culture and Cultural Differences. 6. Working with Culturally Diverse Parents and Families. 7. Culturally Sensitive Treatment with Children. 8. Bias in Service Delivery. 9. Mental Health Issues. 10. Treating Victims of Ethnic Conflict, Genocide, and Mass Violence. 11. Working with Latino/a Clients: An Interview with Roberto Almanzan. 12. Working with Native American Clients: An Interview with Jack Lawson. 13. Working with African American Clients: An Interview with Veronique Thompson. 14. Working with Asian American Clients: An Interview with Dan Hocoy. 15. Working with Arab and Muslim American Clients: An Interview with Marwan Dwairy. 16. Working with South Asian American Clients: An Interview with Sumana Kaipa. 17. Working with White Ethnic Clients: An Interview with the Author. 18. Some Closing Thoughts.

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Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services 1.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Depending on your political views and views on current times, you may or may not like this book. It leans far left. Also, it teaches you how to talk to people who are 1st generation in America. If you are dealing with anyone who is 2nd or 3rd, it is insulting. I did not get anything out of this book and my professor even warned us that it was a bit offensive. I'm not sure why it is still part of the curriculum.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I disliked the book from the beginning and wished I didn't have to finish it as one of my required readings. Its use of the term "people of color" implies that white is not a color and the writer makes no effort to understand how that term is offensive to whites. It is an exclusionary term used to ponder to the feelings of one group at the expense of the other group. This creates an "us and not you" attitude. We teach our children that white is a color and when they grow up learn that white is only a color if it’s on a wall, a car, or a dress. "People of color" in its use is nice and respectful toward its recipients and yet the term "whites' or "white people" is almost always used with a negative connotation in books, in the media, and on the streets. "White people are racist". "White people don't understand our plight." And so on. There is extreme stereotyping that whites do not or cannot understand other cultures and that whites have not suffered racial discrimination. To the contrary, I grew up very poor and have been racially discriminated against many times. How about the knockout game? I saw a t-shirt that said, "God created perfection when He created the black woman." Imagine if the word black was replaced with white the uproar we'd hear. The writer states that non-white cultures are "...socially stigmatized..." and yet this very statement stigmatizes whites as the source of the non-white stigmatizing. The writer implies that the whites are not an ethnic group nor do whites have culture. The writer himself stigmatizes, "culturally diverse clients..." by stating that they are, "...especially susceptible, given their more limited knowledge of mainstream culture." Every minority on the planet should be offended by that. The writer states that building trust between one culture and another is, "...not easy." This is not true. All you have to be is sincere. Be yourself. Be respectful. Be fair. That's it. Do those things for each person regardless of race, culture, or ethnic group and you will have good rapport. All ethnic groups deserve to be treated with respect and with fairness, all of them. As I said, I wish I did not have to finish this book.
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