Darwin's Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution

Darwin's Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution

by Iain McCalman
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Overview

Darwin's Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution by Iain McCalman

In this colorful work of science history, award winning cultural historian Iain McCalman tells the stories of Charles Darwin and his staunchest supporters: Joseph Hooker, Thomas Huxley, and Alfred Wallace. Beginning with the somber morning of April 26, 1882 - the day of Darwin's funeral - Darwin's Armada steps back and recounts the extraordinary lives and discoveries of each of these explorers. who voyaged to the ends of the earth in search of scientific fame. These farflung adventures reshaped their thinking about the natural world and led them to develop and champion the controversial theory of evolution. McCalman recasts the Darwinian revolution as a genuinely collective enterprise, revealing the untold story of Darwin's greatest supporters, who during his life campaigned passionately for the theory of evolution and then lived on to advance the scope of his work.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393338775
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 11/15/2010
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 423
Sales rank: 773,144
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Iain McCalman is an award-winning professor at the , where he lives. He has served as president of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and director of the Humanities Research Centre at ANU. He lives in Sydney.

Table of Contents

Prologue: Darwin's Last Voyage I

Part 1 Charles Darwin and the Beagle, 1831-36

The Prodigal Son 17

The Philosopher at Sea 39

Islands on His Mind 60

Part 2 Joseph Hooker and the Ross Expedition, 1839-43

The Puppet of Natural Selection 85

The Travails of a Young Botanist 106

Pilgrims and Pioneers 127

Part 3 Thomas Huxley and the Voyage of the Rattlesnake, 1846-50

Love and Jellyfish 151

To Hell and Back 175

Walking with Devils 197

Part 4 Alfred Wallace in the Amazon and South-East Asia, 1848-66

A Socialist in the Amazon 221

The Law of the Jungle 245

Boats, Birds and Peoples of Paradise 268

Part 5 The Armada at War, 1859-82

Taking Soundings 293

S.O.S. 317

Battle 339

Epilogue: A Pension for a Captain 363

Notes 374

Bibliography 396

Acknowledgementsp403

Index 406

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Darwin's Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
AnnieBM More than 1 year ago
This book recounts the important voyages which shaped Joseph Hooker, Thomas Huxley, and Alfred Wallace and subsequently how these men became important champions of Darwin's theory of organic evolution. McCalman writes well summarizing the historical details and experiences that shaped their lives and thoughts and ultimately brought them into deep friendship. A book not to be put down until the whole is read. Highly recommended.
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bossbaggs More than 1 year ago
Professor McCalman fills out the portrait of Darwin by exploring the voyages of discovery undertaken by the great man's "lieutenants." While Hooker, Huxley and Wallace were first-rate scientists in their own right, history remembers them primarily as defenders of Darwin's theory of natural selection. The personalities of each man emerge in McCalman's thoughtful and appreciative treatment. While Darwin indeed directed the post-1860 assault on the bastion of creationism, he served as a director of this fine group, not as a dictator. The reader is left with a more fulsome and nuanced picture of Darwin, as well as, new insight into the cultural and political aspects of science.