Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

by Bryan Burrough

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143107972
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/05/2016
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 608
Sales rank: 423,268
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.50(d)

About the Author

Bryan Burrough is a special correspondent at Vanity Fair and the author of five previous books, including The Big Rich and Public Enemies. A former reporter for the Wall Street Journal, he is a three-time winner of the Gerald Loeb Award for excellence in financial journalism.

Read an Excerpt

01

“THE REVOLUTION AIN’T TOMORROW. IT’S NOW. YOU DIG?”
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Days of Rage"
by .
Copyright © 2016 Bryan Burrough.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Author's Note xi

Cast of Characters xvii

Prologue 1

1 "The Revolution Ain't Tomorrow. It's Now. You Dig?": Sam Melville and the Birth of the American Underground 9

2 "Negroes with Guns": Black Rage and the Road to Revolution 26

Part 1 Weatherman

3 "You Say You Want a Revolution": The Movement and the Emergence of Weatherman 55

4 "As to Killing People, We Were Prepared to Do That": Weatherman, January to March 1970 87

5 The Townhouse: Weatherman, March to June 1970 106

6 "Responsible Terrorism": Weatherman, June 1970 to October 1970 132

7 The Wrong Side of History: Weatherman and the FBI, October 1970 to April 1971 152

Part 2 The Black Liberation Army

8 "An Army of Angry Niggas": The Birth of the Black Liberation Army, Spring 1971 173

9 The Rise of the BLA: The Black Liberation Army, June 1971 to February 1972 199

10 "We Got Pretty Small": The Weather Underground and the FBI, 1971-72 218

11 Blood in the Streets of Babylon: The Black Liberation Army, 1973 236

Part 3 The Second Wave

12 The Dragon Unleashed: The Rise of the Symbionese Liberation Army, November 1973 to February 1974 259

13 "Patty Has Been Kidnapped": The Symbionese Liberation Army, February to May 1974 284

14 What Patty Hearst Wrought: The Rise of the Post-SLA Underground 304

15 "The Belfast of North America": Patty Hearst, the SLA, and the Mad Bombers of San Francisco 333

16 Hard Times: The Death of the Weather Underground 361

17 "Welcome to Fear City": The FALN, 1976 to 1978 380

18 "Armed Revolutionary Love": The Odyssey of Ray Levasseur 407

19 Bombs and Diapers: Ray Levasseur's Odyssey, Part II 425

Part 4 Out with a Bang

20 The Family: The Pan-Radical Alliance, 1977 to 1979 447

21 Jailbreaks and Captures: The Family and the FALN, 1979-80 471

22 The Scales of Justice: Trials, Surrenders, and the Family, 1980-81 492

23 The Last Revolutionaries: The United Freedom Front, 1981 to 1984 513

Epilogue 537

Acknowledgments 549

A Note on Sources 553

Notes 557

Bibliography 561

Index 569

What People are Saying About This

Yale University; author of The Day Wall Street Exploded - Beverly Gage

A fascinating portrait of the all-but-forgotten radical underground of the 1960s, '70s, and '80s. Burroughs gives us the first full picture of a secret world where radical dreams often ended in personal and political tragedy.

author of Pictures at a Revolution and Five Came Back - Mark Harris

Bryan Burrough gives the story of America's armed underground revolutionaries of the 1960s and 1970s what it has long desperately needed: Clarity, levelheadedness, context, and reportorial rigor. He has sifted the embers of an essential conflagration of the counterculture, found within it a suspenseful and enlightening history, and told it in a way that is blessedly free of cant or point-scoring.

From the Publisher

William D. Cohan, author of House of Cards, Money and Power, and The Price of Silence
“In spellbinding fashion, Bryan Burrough’s Days of Rage brilliantly explicates one of the most confounding periods of recent American history—the era when a web of home-grown radicals and self-styled anarchists busily plotted the overthrow of the American government. Rarely has such a subject been matched with a writer and reporter of Burrough’s extraordinary skill. I could not put the book down; you won't be able to, either.”

Beverly Gage, Yale University; author of The Day Wall Street Exploded
“A fascinating portrait of the all-but-forgotten radical underground of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s. Burroughs gives us the first full picture of a secret world where radical dreams often ended in personal and political tragedy.”

Mark Harris, author of Pictures at a Revolution and Five Came Back
“Bryan Burrough gives the story of America’s armed underground revolutionaries of the 1960s and 1970s what it has long desperately needed: Clarity, levelheadedness, context, and reportorial rigor. He has sifted the embers of an essential conflagration of the counterculture, found within it a suspenseful and enlightening history, and told it in a way that is blessedly free of cant or point-scoring.”

Paul Ingrassia, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Engines of Change and Crash Course
“Bryan Burrough has delivered a terrific piece of research, reportage and storytelling. Those who lived through the period of America's radical underground, as I did, will be amazed to learn how much they didn’t.”

Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Engines of Change and Crash Course - Paul Ingrassia

Bryan Burrough has delivered a terrific piece of research, reportage and storytelling. Those who lived through the period of America's radical underground, as I did, will be amazed to learn how much they didn't.

author of House of Cards, Money and Power, and The Price of Silence - William D. Cohan

In spellbinding fashion, Bryan Burrough's Days of Rage brilliantly explicates one of the most confounding periods of recent American history—the era when a web of home-grown radicals and self-styled anarchists busily plotted the overthrow of the American government. Rarely has such a subject been matched with a writer and reporter of Burrough's extraordinary skill. I could not put the book down; you won't be able to, either.

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Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Vermillion_Bear More than 1 year ago
I grabbed this book because its narrative seemed relevant to what is happening now in the United States. It is interesting to read about people who thought that armed and violent struggle would lead to a revolution in the U.S. I'm not sure if that would happen today, but there are always people with such viewpoints. I liked being able to hear the thoughts of some of those in the underground and how they justified their actions and the course they took in deciding to use bombs, bank robberies, and other types of violence to send a political message. The history of the various groups formations are intriguing, since all of the members came from different social, racial, class, and political backgrounds to join these groups in fighting for similar causes. Reading about the power dynamics and struggles within the groups makes it understandable how they labored in getting their objectives met. I did enjoy reading this book, but it seems to jump all over the place at times. I understand the author kept a timeline to give a perspective on what each group or member of a group was doing at the time, but it felt rushed and a little disorganized. I had to keep flipping back to remember who was apart of what group and with the name changes some people took, it was even more difficult. Even with those challenges it does not take away from the relevancy of the book. I do wish the epilogue had included more information on what many of those underground did after the momentum slowed and their organizations broke apart. It just seems like everyone was either captured, killed, or turned themselves in but doesn't show what they thought about giving up or why they decided the time was right to come above ground. I highly recommend this book for the anyone interesting in learning about the social and political atmosphere during those times and how it encouraged these mostly young people to take such radical steps.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent book with new perspective
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well researched
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book should be required reading for anyone interested in recent US history up to this very day. There is plenty of action (bombings and bank robberies) for the reader to reflect on how ideas, mostly Marxism, inspired a handful of lawyers, criminals and middle class students to bring fear and anxiety into the lives of Americans. The MASSES did not respond to the call, but the scars are there to be seen. Utopia will never be defeated!
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