Death and Judgment (Guido Brunetti Series #4)

Death and Judgment (Guido Brunetti Series #4)

by Donna Leon

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780802122186
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date: 04/15/2014
Series: Guido Brunetti Series , #4
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 128,113
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Donna Leon is the author of the international best-selling Commissario Guido Brunetti series. The winner of the CWA Macallan Silver Dagger for Fiction, among other awards, Leon was born in New Jersey and has lived in Venice for thirty years.

Hometown:

Venice, Italy

Date of Birth:

February 28, 1942

Place of Birth:

Montclair, New Jersey

Education:

B.A., 1964; M.A. 1969; postgraduate work in English literature

Table of Contents

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

Another captivating mystery featuring "the most humane sleuth since Georges Simenon's Inspector Maigret (The Philadelphia Inquirer)

The sophisticated but still moral Brunetti ... proves a worthy custodian of timeless values and verities. (The Wall Street Journal)

No one is more graceful and accomplished than Leon. (The Washington Post)

Customer Reviews

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Death and Judgment (Guido Brunetti Series #4) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
darwindog96 More than 1 year ago
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jackiepenny More than 1 year ago
I've been trying to read Donna Leon's Brunetti novels in chronilogical order. With each novel the plots get better, the characterizations get deeper and richer, and it's set in a Venice trying to preserve its past. Yet the novels are so politically current with its main characters concerns with such issues as water and air pollution, white slavery and the people from the south.
PastorKim More than 1 year ago
This is probably the same book as Death nnd Judgment, but in UK published under a different title. Similar problem with series #3.
TadAD on LibraryThing 2 hours ago
Another wry and cynical pas d'armes between Commissario Brunetti and the corruption of Italian society. Once again, what starts off looking like a simple crime gradually extends tendrils into the world of the powerful and wealthy of Italy, the individuals who not only view themselves as above the law but, to a certain extent, are above it.Brunetti gave another small smile, "...we need...a list of Signor Trevisan's clients...""I want you to bear in mind that these are not the sort of people who are usually subject to a police investigation."Under ordinary circumstances, Brunetti would have remarked that, except for the last few years, the police had been investigating little except "people like these,"...Brunetti must work against the criminals, his sycophantic superior and corrupt fellow officers to try to unravel the mystery of a series of murders. In the end, he succeeds in understanding what happened and curtailing some portion of the larger problem. However, unlike the previous three books, this one does not provide a neat and satisfying ending; Leon's disenchantment with the crumbling world of her detective is felt much more strongly in this volume. Don't take this as a negative; I think the atmosphere of this story is deeper for it and I'm looking forward to reading the fifth volume.
francescadefreitas on LibraryThing 28 days ago
I wasn't as enthralled with this story as I had been with previous stories in the series - there was no single character that really grabbed my attention. Perhaps the resolution left me feeling cynical and queasy. However, the charms of the setting and of Brunetti and his family, make it an enjoyable read.
FicusFan on LibraryThing 28 days ago
The story of the death of several prominent people, and the pressure to close the case with an acceptable finding. Then another case starts the story of the casual (truck accident) and deliberate killings (snuff film) of women smuggled in for sex work, and then held as slaves. As always there is a wonderful sense of Venice, modern Italians, and their fight with the corrupt bureaucracy of the state. The characters are like old friends, Guido, his family and co-workers. The writing is good, and the ending, much like real life isn't neatly wrapped up.
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