Doubt (movie tie-in edition)

Doubt (movie tie-in edition)

by John Patrick Shanley

Paperback(Media Tie)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781559363471
Publisher: Theatre Communications Group
Publication date: 12/01/2008
Edition description: Media Tie
Pages: 64
Sales rank: 1,246,025
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.30(d)

About the Author


John Patrick Shanley is from the Bronx. He was thrown out of St. Helene's kindergarten, banned from St. Anthony's hot lunch program and expelled from Cardinal Spellman High School. When asked why he had been treated in this way, he burst into tears and said he had no idea. Then he went into the Marine Corps. He did fine. He is still doing ok.

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Doubt 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved "Doubt." It was a very easy play to read and leaves the reader asking questions which is clearly intentional. Shanley could have answered many questions, but allowing the reader to use their imagination is better. I wish there was a bit more background information on the characters. Since it is so short, there isn't much room for character development. I suppose this is because "Doubt" is a limited glimpse into Catholic education in the 1960s. Suspenseful, thrilling, unpredictable. It can easily be read in one sitting! I really enjoyed it, its hard not to like it- it grabs you and holds you for all 120 pages! The sermon about gossip was particularly engaging- especially that scene in the movie. BUT- I recommend reading the play first, then seeing the movie. Use your imagination first, then see what Hollywood came up with!
LynnB on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the story of a catholic school where the principal (Sister Aloysius) suspects that Father Flynn is abusing one of the students. The characters are so finely drawn that I was able to feel the emotional impact the Sister's suspicions had on everyone involved. Simply amazing that such deep characters can be developed in a play format -- the author couldn't rely on descriptions or an all-seeing narrator to build his characters. Instead, we get to know them as we do in life: largely by what they say.What do we do when we aren't sure? What is the impact of acting in sptie of doubt? Or in doing nothing because of it? These are some of the powerful questions raised by this play. I would love to see it performed!
Chuck37 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
No matter how many times I reread this, I still second guess all of the characters and my own thoughts on all of it. Sheer brilliance. Would go and see every live performance out there if possible just to see how each actor and director interprets this - truly, a different play every single time.
HotWolfie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was an excellent play, full of a lot of questions about race, sexuality, perception, and misogyny in the Catholic Church.Pros:An open ending that leaves a lot of room for discussion/debate.A chilling look at various forms of prejudice (i.e. race, sexuality, and gender).A premise that is attention holding.Well paced.A good examination of how poorly women are treated in the Catholic Church.Cons:I felt the ending was a litttle on the nose, but I still enjoyed it.Overall, an excellent play that I highly reccommend if you liked open ended stories. A great piece to debate after reading.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for my English class that is required for my major. I'm not a fan of drama literature, however this book truly interested me because it has you guessing and nothing can really be proven by fact, only by one's own perspective of interpretation. If you like the to see a play where you can argue for or against characters I would recommend you to giving this book a try.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm designing sound for this play for work, reading it was very enjoyable.
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ChaceAlexander More than 1 year ago
John Patrick Shanley's "Doubt" is certainly a work that will inspire introspection. It is not for the faint of faith, certainly, though by the end of the read, anyone would be. A striking drama between insecurity and certainty, between morals and beliefs, between Heaven and Hell. Definitely not a "light" read, though only 58 pages. This could shake even the firmest beliefs in anyone. And most certainly, don't skip the prologue. It's a work in its own right.
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Doubt speaks to a plague that has been with humanity since the beginning. That is, we have an irrepressible penchant for inverted justice: instead of individuals being innocent until proven guilty, they are viewed as guilty until proven innocent. This plague of ignorance, and it's mate, judgmentalness, spreads and contaminates. Lives are ruined, names and reputations, blackened. We see what we want to see (believing is seeing), and that becomes our reality. Perception is distorted, belief is reinforced, reality takes hold. John Patrick Shanley brilliantly teaches this in a play that, ironically, has as its context, the scandal-ridden Roman Catholic Church. He masterfully demonstrates the very real dangers and consequences of being judgmental and self-righteous, and that there really is no such thing as innocent gossip.
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