Dracula's Guest

Dracula's Guest

by Bram Stoker

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781727814736
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 10/16/2018
Pages: 134
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.29(d)

About the Author





Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 - 20 April 1912) was an Irish author, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.




Stoker became interested in the theatre while a student through his friend Dr. Maunsell. He became the theatre critic for the Dublin Evening Mail, co-owned by the author of Gothic tales Sheridan Le Fanu. Theatre critics were held in low esteem, but he attracted notice by the quality of his reviews. In December 1876, he gave a favourable review of Henry Irving's Hamlet at the Theatre Royal in Dublin.




Stoker visited the English town of Whitby in 1890, and that visit is said to be part of the inspiration of his great novel Dracula. He began writing novels while manager for Henry Irving and secretary and director of London's Lyceum Theatre, beginning with The Snake's Pass in 1890 and Dracula in 1897.

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Dracula's Guest 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Bram Stoker's Stories are quite similar. There are many characters that are also similar. They do the same things in 'Dracula's Guest', 'The Judge's Houe', and 'The Squaw'. They do not listen or think of what other people are trying to do for them. The other characters tried to help them, but they did not listen which caused tragedy. Bram Stoker based many of his characters on other characters that are the same.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
In many of Bram Stoker's stories he has the same theme. I got the theme listen to what people tell you out of the stories. It made sense because in most of the stories like 'Dracula's Guest' and 'The Judge's House' there are characters that do not listen and should have listened to what people had told them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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