Egypt's Sister: A Novel of Cleopatra

Egypt's Sister: A Novel of Cleopatra

by Angela Hunt

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Overview

Egypt's Sister: A Novel of Cleopatra by Angela Hunt

New York Times Bestselling Author's Newest Biblical-Era Series

Five decades before the birth of Christ, Chava, daughter of the royal tutor, grows up with Urbi, a princess in Alexandria's royal palace. When Urbi becomes Queen Cleopatra, Chava vows to be a faithful friend no matter what—but after she and Cleopatra have an argument, she finds herself imprisoned and sold into slavery.

Torn from her family, her community, and her elevated place in Alexandrian society, Chava finds herself cast off and alone in Rome. Forced to learn difficult lessons, she struggles to trust a promise HaShem has given her. After experiencing the best and worst of Roman society, Chava must choose between love and honor, between her own desires and God's will for her life.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780764219320
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 07/04/2017
Series: Silent Years Series , #1
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 232,624
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

The author of more than one hundred published books and with nearly 5 million copies of her books sold worldwide, Angela Hunt is the New York Times bestselling author of Risen: The Novelizaton of the Major Motion Picture, The Note, The Nativity Story, and the Dangerous Beauty series. In 2008, Angela completed her PhD in biblical studies in theology. She and her husband live in Florida with their mastiffs. She can be found online at www.angelahuntbooks.com.

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Egypt's Sister: A Novel of Cleopatra 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Tara Runyan 11 months ago
A story about the journey Chava is set on after her best friend, Cleopatra, turns her back on her based on her unwillingness to worship other gods besides the one true God. It is about how their paths intertwine and are leading up to one critical moment. Not much stuck out as unique within the plot except that the story definitely is set around the two girls and their relationship instead of a romance. I have read many similar stories about people going into slavery and coming back out again. However, the details from the time period brought the story to life especially around the historical figure Cleopatra. The main characters were ones you were rooting for and wanted to see what ended up happening with each of them. Additionally, I would have liked to see some of the story from Cleopatra’s point of view since it was about both of them, which I understand would have been difficult with the amount of time that is covered in the story. I would recommend this book to historical fiction lovers.
PatGMoore More than 1 year ago
Egypt's Sister begins when Chava & Urbi are young girls and best friends. Chava's father is the Royal Family's tutor and Urbi's father is the Pharaoh. Chava tells her family that she has had a message from God about her best friend. Chava's family are Jewish and Urbi's family has many gods. Urbi is destined for greatness and Chava has always believed she would be by her best friends side. I read this book in two sittings and only wished it could have lasted longer. This is the first book that I've read by Angela Hunt but definitely won't be my last. If you love Biblical and actual ancient history then I highly recommend this book. The author will transport you back to when Rome ruled most of the world and Egypt was one of the richest and most beautiful places. I loved the characters and while there is very little romance there is love and I hope there will be a sequel. Angela Hunt will definitely touch your heart with this book. I won this book in a contest and this review is my own opinion and no one asked me to leave a review. I had a hard time putting this book down and when I reached the last page I was disappointed it wasn't longer. Somehow 366 pages just weren't enough. I will definitely be buying more of Angela Hunt's books. Chava has to learn to get past betrayals and to realize how God is always with her even when in dire circumstances and danger. Angela Hunt depictions of the live in Egypt and Rome will take you back in time. She shows all the senses (sight, scent, sound) and how Chava grows from a young girl fascinated by the royal household to a strong woman who relies on God. I don't want to give away the story line but this book is definitely a Keeper.
debhgrty More than 1 year ago
Delilah--Deb’s Dozen: Upper-class woman abused, escapes, forced to fend for herself. Survives and thrives. Egypt's Sister--Deb’s Dozen: Upper-class woman sold into slavery, forced to fend for herself, blossoms richly. You’re in for a double delight. I’ve been on an Angela Hunt reading kick and just finished two of her Biblical fiction books, Delilah: Treacherous Beauty (2016) and Egypt’s Sister (2017). The story of Delilah we sort of know from the Bible–Hunt fleshes out the story and helps us realize why Delilah might have done what she did to Samson. Egypt’s Sister tells of a woman who might have been Cleopatra’s friend and what life was like in Egypt during those days as well as in Rome. First: Delilah. Delilah’s mother has married a man from Philistia. A black woman from Egypt, Delilah’s mother was never accepted by society or by her stepson. Delilah, also dark-skinned, has a rare beauty and is lusted after by the stepson. When the man dies, Delilah’s mother is sold into slavery and Delilah is used and abused by the son. Finally she escapes and through a series of events, ends up a weaver by trade. Her story, and how she meets Samson, is fascinating although I never really empathized with her because she always thought herself better than others. However, Hunt did bring her to life and Samson as well. Four stars. Second: Chava. Chava is the daughter of the Jewish scholar, Daniel, who tutors the children of King Auletes of Eqypt. Hunt has chosen the period between the Old and New Testaments as the setting for this story. Chava is closest in age to Urbi, the second daughter of the king. Chava is rich, privileged, and spoiled. Because of their close friendship, Chava feels Urbi will always keep her close by–in fact, Chava receives a message from HaShem telling her, “Your friendship with the queen lies in my hands. You will be with her on her happiest day and her last. And you, daughter of Israel, will know yourself, and you will bless her.” Unfortunately, royalty rules and Urbi, now Cleopatra, has Chava and her father thrown in prison over a minor issue where they languish for months and are finally sold as slaves. Chava ends up in Italy never quite coming to grips with her new situation. She always thinks of herself as better than others and is fortunate to end up in the household of Octavian Caesar and befriended by Agrippa. Another fascinating, well-researched story you’ll want to read. Four stars. Angela Hunt is a much awarded, prolific author with over a hundred books in print and is known for her Biblical fiction. She is a New York Times best-selling author for three books. Angie holds a doctorate in Biblical studies and a ThD degree. She, her husband, and their mastiffs live in Florida. Bethany books gave me copies of Delilah: Treacherous Beauty and Egypt’s Sister, but I was in no way obligated to write a review.
Sharon__C More than 1 year ago
This story was just an adorable story right away, and continues to be! The idea of a telegraph romance is so--again--adorable, and the appeal of a 'nerdy' and unique love interest--a shy one at that--is undeniable. If you want a feel-good story that has a wonderful blend of action, drama, danger, and all-around cuteness in its love story, then look no further! Witemeyer has created a beautiful tale, and outdone herself. Please consider Heart on the Line as your next happy read, because it's worth it! Note: I received this book from Bethany House Publishers specifically to review it. 
hes7 More than 1 year ago
Egypt’s Sister is simply fascinating. As Angela Hunt delves into the history and the culture surrounding Cleopatra, I couldn’t stop reading. The friendship between Chava and Cleopatra, the unfortunate turn it takes, and the subsequent decisions and other realities Chava must face make this book a compelling read. Hunt brings the history and its setting to life vividly and in great detail, and I enjoyed the story she tells in Egypt’s Sister. It’s great historical fiction, and while I haven’t read anything by Angela Hunt before, I certainly look forward to reading more by her in the future. Thanks to Bethany House, I received a complimentary copy of Egypt’s Sister and the opportunity to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all the opinions I have expressed are my own.
J_Augustine More than 1 year ago
2 girls, 1 a queen, but both will change history... I really wasn't sure what to expect when I picked up Egypt's Sister, the back cover blurb sounded really good, as this is the first full-length novel that I've read by Angela Hunt. I'd previously one of her novellas in a completely different genre, it was good so I thought I'd give one of her historicals a shot. I'll admit it, I had a really hard time getting into the story at first. Chava was so shallow and bordered on stupid sometimes. It was hard to get to know or even like her. But I did really enjoy the descriptions of ancient Alexandria and the rich cultural details about the Egyptians and Jews living in the city. However, as Chava's life started to unravel and eventually come completely apart I became engrossed in her story and long before the novel was over I had difficulty putting it down even for a moment. Egypt's Sister is a lush look into the Silent Years of the Bible and into a history that had to take place in order to set the stage for the coming Savior. Angela Hunt has penned an exciting, and yes, gritty, tale of loss, love, and devotion. I, for one, am definitely looking forward to the next book in this series... (I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are entirely my own.)
MelissaF More than 1 year ago
Oh my. Angela Hunt knows how to write a powerful and compelling book. I found it so interesting because I wondered what could ever happen to keep these two friends apart? They had such a special bond. But I had to keep reading to find out and then find out how it would be resolved. I love the fact that Angela took this from "the silent years" between the old and new testament. So interesting what she came up with and how she incorporated history into it. If you like Biblical fiction (although this technically isn't) this is a must read. A copy of this book was given to me by the publisher. All opinions are my own.
LizzyB27 More than 1 year ago
This is a work of fiction, the author did do her research in getting as much historically accurate details, like Alexandria, Rome, Cleopatra, Caesar, Mark Atony, etc. as possible. Chava (pronounced Ha-vah) is a young Jewish girl, daughter of Daniel the scholar and tutor to the royal family. Chava and Urbi ( the young queen Cleopatra) are classmates and best friend. But when Urbi's father dies, Urbi has to marry her own little brother and become queen, practically tossing Chava aside. Cleopatra becomes pregnant by Creaser and imprisons Chava and her father, who are later sold as slaves. Chava was sent to Rome, where she started working on a farm owned by the Octavii family. Chava studied to become a midwife, and successfully delivered the masters daughters baby. Soon, Chava is a highly sought midwife by the rich and famous of Rome. Chava ends up as "friend" to one of her owners, Agrippa, and he ends up tasking her to a negotiation with Cleopatra in exchange for her freedom. She succeeds, and goes home to see if her father, brother, and love interest are all safe.
ARS8 More than 1 year ago
Egypt’s Sister by author Angela Hunt is a rich historical read that we are given a front row seat to watch as the events of the rise of the Roman Empire take place. We take this journey with Chava a young Jewish woman who has grown up as the best friend of Urbi (future Cleopatra) in Alexandria the center of knowledge and education. I would say that this is a coming of age story that shows the growth and maturity of Chava, as she watches the world around her and the world that she thought she knew change so abruptly that it was frightening. Chava is at first a very naïve and stubborn young lady in her views and her opposition to marriage that her father so wants her to do. She is also very loyal to her best friend, Cleopatra, so much so that she forgoes the whole idea of marriage to anyone so that she may be at Cleopatra’s side and her beck in call. I considered this rather foolish of her, understanding the whys but I just felt that she was very narrow minded in her conclusions. The author did an excellent job at showing her growth especially after all she had to endure. We also get a look at what being a friend to a very powerful political person would look like. There is great betrayal and hardship that Chava must endure yet she meets some of the most powerful men of that time; Julius Caesar, Octavian, Marc Antony, and Agrippa. There was much to process as I read this book; the history I was familiar with but the author really shined a new light on the brutality of the ruling Triumvirate that was very frightening. This was a gritty, lush historical that focuses on the time of history and the set up for when the long awaited Messiah would arrive into the world. And as always, I appreciated the author’s notes on what was real and what was fiction. A quote from the book that has really stuck with me is found on pg. 265 by Chava: “I kept thinking of something I once read from Euripides: “Those whom God wishes to destroy, he first makes mad.” I received a copy of this novel for free from the publisher. I was not required to post a positive review and all views and opinions are my own.
Nicnac63 More than 1 year ago
I’m a big fan of Angela Hunt. She is a gifted storyteller and creates beautiful Biblical Fiction. She puts a lot of research and dedication into her writing, and many of her characters are based on real people in history. With that said, this isn’t one of my favorites that she’s written. It is a good story, but it didn’t fully captivate me. I found myself putting the book down and not being in a hurry to pick it back up. Although I wasn’t fully invested in Cleopatra, Chava gave me reason I continued on. The aspect I loved about this book was Chava’s unique and intriguing relationship with God. Her faith is touching and carried the story, but I wish the pacing was a bit more steady. Overall, this is a good story (but not great like the other books I’ve read by this author!) 3 Stars Cover: Love Title: Love Publisher: Bethany House Publishers Pages: 384 I received a complimentary copy from Bethany House and NetGalley.
LibbyMcKinmer More than 1 year ago
Chava, daughter of Jewish scholar and tutor Daniel, and Urbi, an Egyptian princess, grow up together in ancient Alexandria. Urbi goes on to become Cleopatra, while Chava’s life takes a completely different turn. Chava is convinced she has heard God tell her she will be with Cleopatra on her happiest day and on the last day of her life, but Chava is soon living very far away from her childhood friend. Set in the time of Julius Caesar, Mark Anthony and the Triumvirate, this story pulls you into the wonderful, innocent, loving heart of Chava as she faces the many challenges she encounters, never letting go of her deeply-held faith and values, even when separated from family and friends. Egypt’s Sister is the perfect read to curl up on the couch with, cup of tea or coffee at hand, and immerse yourself in the culture and times of Alexandria and Rome about 100 BC.
Laundry_Whispers More than 1 year ago
This book is so hard to review right now. When I saw it come across the available titles at Bethany House and NetGalley it captured my attention and I HAD to read it. Biblical fiction is a favorite genre of mine (well, lets face it there's so few genres that aren't a favorite!). While not exactly Biblical the synopsis definitely fits into the genre. There's the added bonus of Angela Hunt who is just amazing. However, the execution didn't quite hit the expectation, at least for me. Set during the 'Silent Years', this book tells the story of a young Jewish girl, Chava, who is raised with and envisions a lifelong friendship with Cleopatra VII. The appearances of Cleopatra were few, which was disappointing in a book about her, but Chava's story had potential to be interesting. There are several things, if you haven't figured out yet, that fell flat for me with this book. I felt like I was reading a historical text as opposed to a novel about the lives of two historical women, one of which is quite famous as the subject of books, movies and documentaries. There was so much historical 'filler' that took away from the story. Just an example, referencing that the battle with Caesar in Alexandria would become known as the Alexandrian War seems out of place for a character to reference something that would come later, most likely after her time. With all the extra research filler the story tended to drag along. It read quickly but the story was sluggish. I don't to pick about everything but another thing that struck me as beyond odd was how quickly Chava became a midwife and trained another midwife. It felt like 'hey look at me, I successfully delivered a baby and read a scroll, put me in coach!'. There were a few things that just didn't add up or were just too much that brought this down for me. It wasn't all drawbacks and sluggishness. Honestly, my favorite portrayal was of Agrippa. He was a gentleman, kind, honest and accommodating. He didn't just look at for number one but for all those he cared about. Chava, when she was simply telling of her life was engaging. When the story slipped into research mode that was lost but she kept me in the story. I promise I didn't totally fall flat on the book. It left a lot to be desired for me but I love the premise, I adore the author and I think in the right hands this book will be a blessing and become well loved. I was provided a complimentary copy of this book by Bethany House and NetGalley. I was not compensated for this review and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. I was not required to write a positive review.
luvnjesus More than 1 year ago
I will admit from the start that I had a hard time getting in Egypt's Sister by Angela Hunt. I found myself rereading some pages and unable to relate to the characters, this was the first book I have read by Angela Hunt and most often do not read biblical fiction, with that said the author wrote an awesome book The main point of the story was Chava's relationship with God and Urbi, an Egyptian princess who became as close as sisters. Urbi unexpectedly ascends the throne as Queen Cleopatra. Chava believes their bond is strong enough to survive, but her ultimate betrayal takes her from everything where she must choose between love, honor and God's will for her life. Overall, a well written story that just didn’t do it for me. I received this book from the Bethany House, but I was in no way required to leave a positive review. I will wait and read Book 2.
rubber_duckie91 More than 1 year ago
Egypt’s Sister is a work of biblical fiction written by Angela Hunt about a Hebrew girl named Chava who is the best of friends with an Egyptian princess by the name of Urbi. The two were as close as sisters and even swore what we would now call a blood oath to one another. From then on they referred to each other as “Blood of my blood. Heart of my heart.” They swore they would remain friends forever and that nothing could come between them, but that all changes when Urbi’s father passes away and she must marry her younger brother and take the throne as Queen Cleopatra. Chava is betrayed in the most awful of ways, her family torn apart, and herself sold in the slavery where she struggles with her faith as she has to fight her way from the lowest of lives in order to regain her freedom and fulfill that which God, or Adonai, had spoken to her. I’m not sure I can even begin to put into words just how much I loved this book. It was a breathtaking work of fiction interlaced with loads of historical truths. The mounds and mounds of research that had to have gone into this one book is astonishing. As I read I found myself often having to pause and go read more about the things I had learned from this book. I knew just the most basic of aspects about Cleopatra, Julius Caesar, Mark Anthony, Octavian (Caesar Augustus), and knew nothing of Agrippa. This book was not only a tantalizing tale of a young Hebrew girl that captured my heart but a book that taught me so much and has me wanting to learn more about all of these historical figures. It has been years since I have felt such an overwhelming desire to learn as much as I possibly can about a subject but this book has opened that childlike wonder inside of me and I know my next few weeks, if not months, will be spent absorbing everything I can about these people and the world in which they lived. Aside from the amazing historical accurateness of this book Hunt managed to give such life into her characters simply by her writing. Chava is such a strong but naive young girl who blindly believes that becoming a queen will not change her best friend or effect their friendship but we watch her grow from that girl into an even stronger woman who is brave, intelligent, and understanding of all that is going on around her. When first betrayed by her friend she begins to question her faith in Adonai and his promises but she manages to reaffirm her faith and trust in him wholly and he leads her through the darkest times in life. She is the type of person that we all should aspire to be like. On the other side, we have Urbi who goes from a young intelligent girl who is not known for being beautiful to a cold calculating queen who manages to catch the attention of some of the most powerful men in history. Hunt manages to portray every aspect of the women Cleopatra was in how she describes her having her siblings killed and using her manipulative and persuasive ways to hold the eyes of Julius Caesar and Mark Anthony. This book in a matter of the 2 days it took me to finish me became one of my top 5 favorites and I have already begun the research of deciding which book by Angela Hunt will be my next. This was by far the easiest book review I have written as the words just kept flooding too me on how I love and adore this book. I have already recommended this book to a few people but I am encouraging anyone who reads this review to go find a copy of this book as it is an amazing and intriguing page tu
rubber_duckie91 More than 1 year ago
Egypt’s Sister is a work of biblical fiction written by Angela Hunt about a Hebrew girl named Chava who is the best of friends with an Egyptian princess by the name of Urbi. The two were as close as sisters and even swore what we would now call a blood oath to one another. From then on they referred to each other as “Blood of my blood. Heart of my heart.” They swore they would remain friends forever and that nothing could come between them, but that all changes when Urbi’s father passes away and she must marry her younger brother and take the throne as Queen Cleopatra. Chava is betrayed in the most awful of ways, her family torn apart, and herself sold in the slavery where she struggles with her faith as she has to fight her way from the lowest of lives in order to regain her freedom and fulfill that which God, or Adonai, had spoken to her. I’m not sure I can even begin to put into words just how much I loved this book. It was a breathtaking work of fiction interlaced with loads of historical truths. The mounds and mounds of research that had to have gone into this one book is astonishing. As I read I found myself often having to pause and go read more about the things I had learned from this book. I knew just the most basic of aspects about Cleopatra, Julius Caesar, Mark Anthony, Octavian (Caesar Augustus), and knew nothing of Agrippa. This book was not only a tantalizing tale of a young Hebrew girl that captured my heart but a book that taught me so much and has me wanting to learn more about all of these historical figures. It has been years since I have felt such an overwhelming desire to learn as much as I possibly can about a subject but this book has opened that childlike wonder inside of me and I know my next few weeks, if not months, will be spent absorbing everything I can about these people and the world in which they lived. Aside from the amazing historical accurateness of this book Hunt managed to give such life into her characters simply by her writing. Chava is such a strong but naive young girl who blindly believes that becoming a queen will not change her best friend or effect their friendship but we watch her grow from that girl into an even stronger woman who is brave, intelligent, and understanding of all that is going on around her. When first betrayed by her friend she begins to question her faith in Adonai and his promises but she manages to reaffirm her faith and trust in him wholly and he leads her through the darkest times in life. She is the type of person that we all should aspire to be like. On the other side, we have Urbi who goes from a young intelligent girl who is not known for being beautiful to a cold calculating queen who manages to catch the attention of some of the most powerful men in history. Hunt manages to portray every aspect of the women Cleopatra was in how she describes her having her siblings killed and using her manipulative and persuasive ways to hold the eyes of Julius Caesar and Mark Anthony. This book in a matter of the 2 days it took me to finish me became one of my top 5 favorites and I have already begun the research of deciding which book by Angela Hunt will be my next. This was by far the easiest book review I have written as the words just kept flooding too me on how I love and adore this book. I have already recommended this book to a few people but I am encouraging anyone who reads this review to go find a copy of this book as it is an amazing and intriguing page tu
rubber_duckie91 More than 1 year ago
Egypt’s Sister is a work of biblical fiction written by Angela Hunt about a Hebrew girl named Chava who is the best of friends with an Egyptian princess by the name of Urbi. The two were as close as sisters and even swore what we would now call a blood oath to one another. From then on they referred to each other as “Blood of my blood. Heart of my heart.” They swore they would remain friends forever and that nothing could come between them, but that all changes when Urbi’s father passes away and she must marry her younger brother and take the throne as Queen Cleopatra. Chava is betrayed in the most awful of ways, her family torn apart, and herself sold in the slavery where she struggles with her faith as she has to fight her way from the lowest of lives in order to regain her freedom and fulfill that which God, or Adonai, had spoken to her. I’m not sure I can even begin to put into words just how much I loved this book. It was a breathtaking work of fiction interlaced with loads of historical truths. The mounds and mounds of research that had to have gone into this one book is astonishing. As I read I found myself often having to pause and go read more about the things I had learned from this book. I knew just the most basic of aspects about Cleopatra, Julius Caesar, Mark Anthony, Octavian (Caesar Augustus), and knew nothing of Agrippa. This book was not only a tantalizing tale of a young Hebrew girl that captured my heart but a book that taught me so much and has me wanting to learn more about all of these historical figures. It has been years since I have felt such an overwhelming desire to learn as much as I possibly can about a subject but this book has opened that childlike wonder inside of me and I know my next few weeks, if not months, will be spent absorbing everything I can about these people and the world in which they lived. Aside from the amazing historical accurateness of this book Hunt managed to give such life into her characters simply by her writing. Chava is such a strong but naive young girl who blindly believes that becoming a queen will not change her best friend or effect their friendship but we watch her grow from that girl into an even stronger woman who is brave, intelligent, and understanding of all that is going on around her. When first betrayed by her friend she begins to question her faith in Adonai and his promises but she manages to reaffirm her faith and trust in him wholly and he leads her through the darkest times in life. She is the type of person that we all should aspire to be like. On the other side, we have Urbi who goes from a young intelligent girl who is not known for being beautiful to a cold calculating queen who manages to catch the attention of some of the most powerful men in history. Hunt manages to portray every aspect of the women Cleopatra was in how she describes her having her siblings killed and using her manipulative and persuasive ways to hold the eyes of Julius Caesar and Mark Anthony. This book in a matter of the 2 days it took me to finish me became one of my top 5 favorites and I have already begun the research of deciding which book by Angela Hunt will be my next. This was by far the easiest book review I have written as the words just kept flooding too me on how I love and adore this book. I have already recommended this book to a few people but I am encouraging anyone who reads this review to go find a copy of this book as it is an amazing and intriguing page tu
VJoyPalmer More than 1 year ago
Angela Hunt has done it again! Wow! Wow! WOW! Chava is a young woman who's grown up with a lot of privilege. Her family is not hurting for money, and they are in very good standing in the community. I mean, she's best friends with an Egyptian princess for crying out loud! Until standing up for what she believes results in her enslavement... If you've been hanging around my accounts for awhile, you know that Biblical Fiction has become one of my favorite genres. Why? Because it makes you think about things in or surrounding Bible times to which we have become desensitized in our daily lives. While Egypt's Sister is set during The Silent Years (the time period between The Old Testament and The New Testament), it is still a very powerful story! And the rich history! I have never felt so woefully uninformed in all my life - with the exception of my freshman Algebra class. However, the history was not dry and boring, but naturally woven into the fast-moving plot. I found it very moving to read about how God used Chava's sudden fall in society to not only humble her heart, but also to teach her about who she really was in Him. This is a girl power book at it's finest! Egypt's Sister also showcases the power behind God's words and how He can work even the worst situation for good. Five Stars - An extraordinary look into life during The Silent Years. Egypt's Sister is a must read for fans of Biblical Fiction! I received a copy of Egypt's Sister by Angela Hunt from Bethany House Publishers, a division of Baker Publishing Group. All opinions expressed are my own.
Mocha-with-Linda More than 1 year ago
I'm not a fan of ancient history settings and stories, but anything by Angela Hunt is a must-read for me. True to form, she swept me into the story and held my attention throughout the novel. Hunt seamlessly intertwines fact and fiction in this captivating tale of friendship, power, and faith. Her impeccable research add depth and rich historical detail without dragging the story down or making it read like a textbook. Set in the intertestamental period, also known as the Silent Years, the time between the Old and New Testaments when God did not speak to his people through prophets, Egypt's Sister is a reminder that God is always present even when He is silent. I completely loved this novel and couldn't set it aside until the last page was turned. Don't miss this fascinating story! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy of this book free from Baker/Bethany House for a blog tour. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
bookbloggerKB More than 1 year ago
Egypt’s Sister by Angela Hunt Chava lived a charmed life as the daughter of Cleopatra’s royal tutor. She grew up in the palace and the princess was her best friend. Even though she was Jewish and Cleopatra was Egyptian, Chava expected her life in the royal palace to continue unchanged. But after Cleopatra’s coronation, the politics and intrigue of power change the queen and she betrays Chava and sentences her to a life of slavery. Chava believes she will see Cleopatra again, but will it be too late? Angela Hunt is one of my favorite authors. I can count on enjoying her novels. This was no exception. However, Egypt’s Sister took me much longer to reach the “can’t put it down” stage because of the detailed historical foundation that needed to be laid. Once that was done, I was caught up in the devastating changes that Chava experienced. Although laying the historical background made for a slow beginning, the information that the author included about the culture and life in Alexandria and Rome made a fascinating background for the story. I loved learning more about that particular time in history. The author’s research was meticulous and it showed. As always, Hunt’s characters were interesting and life-like. Cleopatra, one of history’s most infamous women, was especially fascinating. Her motivation to remain in control of Egypt made sense in light of her actions. The prevailing theme of Egypt’s Sister was one of hope. Despite Chava’s devastating circumstances, she persisted in believing God. Even through suffering and in the midst of a pagan culture, Chava proved God’s faithfulness. Readers who enjoy historical fiction will enjoy this book. I received a free copy for my honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The author, Angela Hunt, winds a story around the life and loves of Cleopatra. The story is told in the voice of Chava (pronounced hah-vah) who as a child was a playmate and best friend to Cleopatra. They even swore to be blood sisters. Chava, a Jewish girl, loved Cleopatra, but knew she would never be on the same plain as Cleopatra; an Egyptian princess who would someday become Queen. But, she also felt they would always remain blood sisters and be in each other’s lives. She was thrilled to be a friend to the future Queen. She envisioned someday being her lady-in-waiting. If you’ve always thought you knew the story of Cleopatra, this book gives a look into the life of Cleopatra, and some Egyptian, Roman and Greek history. It is also the story of Chava, a Hebrew who starts out life with a naive view of the world. She soon learns some heartbreaking and also back-breaking lessons about love and giving your allegiance to a person. Chava is called by God whom she calls HaShem, for a special purpose in her life. She knows she has to remain true to what God has called her to do, but at times, she would prefer to follow her heart. The chain of events that follow in her life somehow don’t seem to fit with what God has asked of her, and she doesn’t see how His plan will be fulfilled. The author does a great job of setting the scenes of life through a woman who would have lived a century before Christ and the New Testament. There are many scenes when Chava and Cleopatra are young friends. There is also depictions of the differences of Egyptians and the Jewish population and what it means for Chava. In the beginning of reading the book, it took me a minute to grasp where the author might be going with this story, but it didn’t take long to get to the meat of the story, and my interest stayed piqued. There were many twists and turns, but to me that made it all the more interesting and a desire to keep reading to find out what happened next. It is a great and interesting story, and the author writes in such a way that you will feel different emotions; some anger, some sadness, and some bitterness. The author does a good job of getting the point of her book across. I would definitely say this is a must-have for anyone’s reading list no matter your genre preference. I received The Captain’s Daughter as a copy from the publisher. No review, positive or otherwise was required. All opinions are my own. The reviews on my blog are specifically my own interpretation of my like or dislike for a book that I read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I received a copy of EGYPT’S SISTER: A NOVEL OF CLEOPATRA by Angela Hunt from Bethany House in exchange for an honest review. It is the first book in the “Silent Years” series. I had read other books by Angela Hunt, so I knew it would be in for a treat. This book is a delight. I have always felt a passion for books about Ancient Egypt, and Cleopatra in general. It all began when I was in elementary school and read Cleopatra’s fictional diary. After that I couldn’t get my hands on enough material, both books and movies, about Egypt. I haven’t read that much in the past few years, so imagine my delight when this fell into my lap and sparked my love all over again. EGYPT’S SISTER is filled with rich, historical details. It transports you into the past. Unlike some stories that only feature happiness, this one is raw and realistic. Go in knowing that you will gasp. You will cringe. You may need to set it down for a minute. I feel the need to point out this is Christian fiction. It adds an extra level of depth. Usually the Cleopatra books that I read are strictly secular. I look forward to reading the sequel when it comes out.
LannieM More than 1 year ago
I recently finished reading Egypt’s Sister by Angela Hunt. This was an interesting story that definitely captured my attention. The characters, especially Chava, were the strongest part of the story. I found myself wondering exactly how everything would turn out. The main plot line of the story was definitely Chava’s relationship with God, which is very unique in most inspirational fiction (although based on the name of the genre, you might assume otherwise). I appreciated that aspect of the story, and I felt that it was accomplished very well. That being said, I did not feel a particular connection to the characters, despite the fact that they were well written. I was interested in what happened to them, true, but I could have easily set this book down and never picked it up again without losing sleep over the ending. In a way, the ending contributed to this feeling, as it came out a tad anti-climactic. That being said, it might just be a matter of taste, as I do not often read biblical fiction. Overall, a well written story that just didn’t do it for me. I received this book from the publisher, but I was in no way required to leave a positive review. All opinions are my own.
NadineTimes10 More than 1 year ago
As the Jewish daughter of a royal tutor, Chava grows up close to palace life in Alexandria. She’s sure that she’ll not be parted from her girlhood friend, the princess Urbi, not even when Urbi ascends to the throne and becomes Queen Cleopatra. But when a crushing betrayal lands Chava in slavery, she wonders what will become of her life and a promise God once spoke to her in Egypt’s Sister, a novel by author Angela Hunt. I’ve enjoyed Biblical Fiction by this author before and was intrigued to hear that she’d be writing a series about the biblical “Silent Years.” My favorite aspect of this novel is the fact that Chava hears God during this period when He’s supposedly silent. (Yeah—I don’t believe God goes mute so much as we go deaf, but I won’t get into that.) Now, there were some things in the novel that didn’t make complete sense to me. The process of Chava’s enslavement, for one, didn’t seem to make logical business sense. Aside from that, while this book is called A Novel of Cleopatra, the queen is off screen for most of it. She’s out there living her (now notorious) life, while Chava is left to pine and obsess over her. Eventually, Chava herself alludes to “obsessing over Urbi” for years. I also found the extent of Chava’s naiveté to be unbelievable at times. Although she’s done some growing by the later chapters, it’s hard for me to be super-enthused about a story when I only feel so-so about the main character. Still, the ending of the novel has put me in anticipation of the next one in The Silent Years series. ___________ Bethany House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.