Enchanted (Woodcutter Sisters Series #1)

Enchanted (Woodcutter Sisters Series #1)

by Alethea Kontis

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780544022188
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 05/28/2013
Series: Woodcutter Sisters Series , #1
Pages: 329
Sales rank: 365,663
Product dimensions: 5.66(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.88(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author


Alethea Kontis is the New York Times best-selling co-author of Sherrilyn Kenyon’s The Dark-Hunter Companion.Alethea was a student of the science-fiction greats Andre Norton and Orson Scott Card, and she has worked in a number of book-related jobs. She lives in Ashburn, Virginia. Visit her at www.aletheakontis.com.

Read an Excerpt

1: Fool’s Gold and Fairy Stones

My name is Sunday Woodcutter, and I am doomed to a happy life.

I am the seventh daughter of Jack and Seven Woodcutter, Jack a seventh son and Seven a seventh daughter herself. Papa’s dream was to give birth to the charmed, all-powerful Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. Mama told him seven girls or seven boys, whichever came first. Jack Junior was first. Papa was elated. His dream died the morning I popped out, blithe and bonny and good and gay, seven daughters later.

Fortunately, coming first did not stop Jack Junior from being a wunderkind. I never knew my eldest sibling, but I know his legend. All of Arilland’s children grew up in Jack’s shadow, his younger siblings more than most. I have never known a time when I wasn’t surrounded by the overdramatic songs and stories of Jack Junior’s exploits. A good number of new ones continue to spring up about the countryside to this very day. I have heard them all. (Well, all but the Forbidden Tale. I’m not old enough for that one yet.)

But I know the most important tale: the tale of his demise, while he served in the King’s Royal Guard. One day, in a fit of pique or passion (depending on the bard), he killed Prince Rumbold’s prized pup. As punishment, the prince’s evil fairy godmother witched Jack Junior into a mutt and forced him to take the pup’s place. He was never heard from again.

They say my family was never the same after that. I wish I could know my father as tales portray him then: loud, confident, and opinionated. Now he is simply a strong, quiet man, content with his place in life. It is no secret that Papa harbors no loyalty to the royal family of Arilland, but he has never said a word against them.

My second-eldest brother’s name is Peter. My third brother is Trix. Trix was a foundling child that Papa discovered in the limbs of a tree at the edge of the Wood one winter’s workday before I was born. The way Mama tells it, Trix was a son she didn’t have to give birth to, and he made Papa happy. She already had too many children to feed, what was one more?

My sisters and I—

"What are you doing?"

Sunday’s head snapped up from her journal. She had chosen this spot for its solitude, followed the half-hidden path through the underbrush to the decaying rocks of the abandoned well, sure that she had escaped her family. And yet, the voice that had interrupted her thoughts was not familiar to her. Her eyes took a moment to adjust, slowly focusing on the mottled shadows the afternoon sun cast through dancing leaves.

"I’m sorry?" She posed the polite query to her unknown visitor in an effort to make him reveal himself, be he real or imagined, dead or alive, fairy or—

"I said, ‘What are you doing?’ "

—frog.

Sunday forced her gaping mouth closed. Caught off-guard, she sputtered the truth: "I’m telling myself stories."

The frog considered her answer. He balanced himself on his spotted hind legs and blinked at her with his bulbous eyes. "Why? Do you have no one to whom you can tell them?"

Apart from his interruption, he maintained an air of polite decorum. He’s smart, too, Sunday thought. He must have been a human before being cursed. Animals of the Wood only ever spoke in wise riddles and almost-truths.

"I have quite a large family, actually, with lots of stories. Only . . ."

"Only what?"

"Only no one wants to hear them."

"I do," said the frog. "Read me your story, the story you have just written there, and I will listen."

She liked this frog. Sunday smiled, but slowly closed her book. "You don’t want to hear this story."

"Why not?"

"It’s not very interesting."

"What’s it about?"

"It’s about me. That’s why none of my family wants to hear it. They already know all about me."

The frog stretched out on his sun-dappled rock like he was settling into a chaise lounge. She could tell from his body language—so much more human than frog—there would be no turning him down. "I don’t know anything about you," he said. "You may begin your story."

It was completely absurd. Absurd that Sunday was in the middle of the Wood talking to a frog. Absurd that he wanted to learn about her. Absurd that he would care. It was so absurd that she opened her journal and started reading from the top of the page.

" ‘My name is Sunday Woodcutter—’ "

"Grumble," croaked the frog.

"If you’re going to grumble through the whole thing, why did you ask me to read it in the first place?"

"You said your name was Sunday Woodcutter," said the frog. "My name is Grumble."

"Oh." Her face felt hot. Sunday wondered briefly if frogs could tell that a human was blushing or if they were one of the many colorblind denizens of the forest. She bowed her head slightly. "It’s very nice to meet you, Grumble."

"At your service," said Grumble. "Please, carry on with your story."

It was awkward, as Sunday had never read her musings aloud to anyone. She cleared her throat several times. More than once she had to stop after a sentence she had quickly stumbled through and start again more slowly. Her voice seemed overloud and the words felt foreign and sometimes wrong; she resisted the urge to scratch them out or change them as she went along. She was worried that this frog-who-used-to-be-a-man would hear her words and think she was silly. He would want nothing more to do with her. He would thank her for her time, and she would never see him again. Had her young life come to this? Was she so desperate for intelligent conversation that she was willing to bare her soul to a complete stranger? Sunday realized, as she continued to read, that it didn’t matter. She would have Grumble know her for who she was.

For as long as she had sat under the tree writing, she thought the reading of it would have taken longer, but Sunday came to the end in no time at all. "I had meant to go on about my sisters," she apologized, "but . . ."

The frog was strangely silent. He stared off into the Wood.

Sunday turned her face to the sun. She was afraid of his next words. If he didn’t like the writing, then he didn’t like her, and everything she had done in her whole life would be for nothing. Which was silly, but she was silly, and absurd, and sometimes ungrateful, but she promised the gods that she would not be ungrateful now, no matter what the frog said. If he said anything at all. And then, finally:

"I remember a snowy winter’s night. It was so cold outside that your fingertips burned if you put them on the windowpane. I tried it only once." He let out a long croak. "I remember a warm, crackling fire on a hearth so large I could have stood up in it twice. There was a puppy there, smothering me with love, as puppies are wont to do. I was his whole world. He needed me and I felt like . . . like I had a purpose. I remember being happy then. Maybe the happiest I’ve been in my whole life." The frog closed his eyes and bowed his head. "I don’t remember much of my life before. But now, just now, I remember that. Thank you."

Sunday clasped her shaking fingers together and swallowed the lump in her throat. He was definitely a man in a frog’s body, and he was sad. She couldn’t think what in her words had moved him so, but that wasn’t the point. She had touched him. Not just him as a frog but the man he used to be. A more gracious reply Sunday could never have imagined. "I am honored," she said, for she was.

"And then I interrupted you." Grumble snapped out of his dreamlike tone into a more playful one. "Forgive me. As you can imagine, I don’t get many visitors. You honor me by indulging me with your words, kind lady. Do you write often?"

"Yes. Every morning and every night and every moment I can sneak in between."

"And do you always write about your family?"

Sunday flipped the pages of her never-ending journal—her nameday gift from Fairy Godmother Joy—past her thumb. It was a nervous habit she’d had all her life. "I am afraid to write anything else."

"Why is that?"

Maybe it was because the honesty was intoxicatingly freeing or because he was a frog and not a man, but she felt strangely comfortable with Grumble. She had already told him so much about her life, more than anyone had ever before cared to know. Why should she stop now? "Things I write . . . well . . . they have a tendency to come true. And not in the best way."

"For instance?"

"I didn’t want to gather the eggs one morning, so I wrote down that I didn’t have to. That night, a weasel got into the henhouse. No one got eggs that morning. Another time, I did not want to go with the family to market."

"Did the wagon break a wheel?"

"I got sick with the flu and was in bed for a week," she said with a smile. " ‘Regret’ is not a strong enough word."

"I imagine not," said Grumble.

"And now you’re wondering what would happen if I wrote that you were free of your spell."

"The thought had crossed my mind."

"You might not come back as a man but as a mouse or a mule or a tiger who’d eat me alive. You might come back as a man but not the man you were. You might be missing something vital, like an arm or a leg or—"

"My mind?" Grumble joked.

"—breath," Sunday answered seriously.

"Ah. We must always be careful what we wish for."

"Exactly. If I write only about events that have already come to pass, there is no danger of my accidentally altering the future. No one but the gods should have power over such things."

"A very practical decision."

"Yes." She sighed. "Very practical and very boring. Very just like me."

"On the contrary. I found your brief essay quite intriguing."

"Really?" He was just saying that to be nice. And then she remembered he was a frog. Funny how she kept forgetting.

"Will you read to me again tomorrow?"

If her ridiculously large smile didn’t scare him off, surely nothing she wrote could. "I would love to."

"And would you . . . be my friend?" he asked tenuously.

The request was charming and humble. "Only if you will be mine in return."

Grumble’s mouth opened wide into what Sunday took to be a froggy grin. "And . . . if I may be so bold, Miss Woodcutter—"

"Please, call me Sunday."

"Sunday . . . do you think you could find it in your heart to . . . kiss me?"

She had wondered how long it would take before he got around to asking. A maiden’s kiss was the usual remedy for his particular enchantment. Normally Sunday would have declined without a thought. But he had been so polite, and she was surely the only maiden he would come across for a very long time. It was the least she could do.

His skin was bumpy and slightly damp, but she tried not to think about it. After she kissed him, she straightened up quickly and backed away. She wasn’t sure what to expect. A shower of sparks? Some sort of explosion? Either way, she wanted to stand clear of whatever was involved in turning a frog back into a man.

Sunday waited.

And waited.

Nothing happened.

They stared at each other for a long time afterward.

"I don’t have to come back, you know, in case you were offering just to be courteous."

"Oh no," he said quickly. "I look forward to hearing about your sisters. Please, do come back tomorrow."

"Then I will, after I finish my chores. But I should go now, before it gets dark. Mama will be expecting me to help with dinner." She stood and brushed what dirt she could off her skirt. "Good night, Grumble."

"Until tomorrow, Sunday."

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"A fabulous fairy-tale mashup that deserves hordes of avid readers. Absolutely delectable."—Kirkus, starred review

"Kontis delivers a fairy-tale mash-up that outright sparkles."—School Library Journal, starred review

"Fantasy readers will undoubtedly enjoy the . . . mash-up of these famous stories, spiced with comedy, romance and magical powers."—VOYA

"A charming tumble of fairy tales, spiced with humor and sprinkled with true love." —Sharon Shinn, best-selling author of the Samaria series

"If Neil Gaiman and the Brothers Grimm had a child who grew up to weave fairy tales, she would be Alethea Kontis. Read this book—it’s an absolute winner."—J.T. Ellison, best-selling author of Where All the Dead Lie

"As mischievous a garden full of fairies and twice as clever, Enchanted proves there’s more than life left in the oldest genre in the world—there’s a lot of heart, too." —Sean Williams, New York Times best-selling author

"Kontis is a born spell-caster and her work is spellbinding. In the style of great fairy tales, Kontis has created a delightful, heartfelt new classic that can charm the sun out from behind the clouds." —Leanna Renee Hieber, author of the Strangely Beautiful and Magic Most Foul series

"Alethea Kontis’s debut is full of inventive whimsy. Take your favorite fairytale and spin it to the side, throw in a half-dozen other tales all dancing, and you get this Enchanted ball."—Mary Robinette Kowal, award-winning author of Shades of Milk and Honey

"It's the relaxed humor of Kontis' presentation that not only ups the realism of characters unfazed by talking frogs and fey characters but also gives this offering its sweet, distinctive stamp."—Booklist

 

Customer Reviews

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Enchanted 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 91 reviews.
sikbookreviewer More than 1 year ago
Originally reviewed on my blog: SIK Book Reviews Enchanted is Alethea Kontis's debut YA novel. Although, she has written short stories, essays, reviews, etc. I think she did a very good job with this novel and I believe she has a lot of potential for her future novels. I look forward to reading her next book. This novel is a lovely fairy tale story filled with wondrous magic, first loves, and dangerous adventure. I very much enjoyed the way Kontis told the story, using all different types of fairy tales and melding them into one lovely fairy tale story. Although I am partial to the original fairy tales filled with doom and gloom and no happily ever after, I do still enjoy the more modern fairy tales in all their glory of true love stories and the happy endings. I am a romantic at heart, after all. I loved all of the characters. I thought the Woodcutter family members were all presented in a fun and interesting way. Sunday and her sisters each have their own unique characteristics that are delightful to read about. Sunday is a sweet young girl who just loves to write, tell, and hear stories. She is a very endearing character who you can't help but love. Rumbold (the prince/the frog) begins as a very mysterious character, with secrets hidden in his past. He seems like such a nice young man, but the mystery causes one to wonder what has happened in the past. The fact is, he doesn't even know...so, as the reader, we get to learn right alongside him. I thought the writing style was very good for a debut novelist. There were some mistakes, but it didn't bother me too much (but I am an English major, so these things do tend to bother me more than the average person!). Kontis's writing was able to envelop me in the story enough to fully enjoy it. The beginning, however, did not grab me as much as I would have liked...but, it did grab me later on. I thought the story was creative and unique in the way that all types of fairy tales made an appearance in just one story. The fairy tales also had unique twists to differentiate them from the canonical versions, but keeping the core motifs intact. I also love the cover and the title. They are perfect for the story. The only thing I would complain about is how quickly Sunday falls in love with the frog. It didn't seem quite right to fall in love that fast and that easy for a first time love, especially since she wasn't falling in love with the human himself, she was falling in love with an enchanted frog. One would think that this would take some time to wrap her mind around the fact that he is not human and then gradually fall in love...
FuzzyCoffeeBooks More than 1 year ago
I cannot praise this book enough. I loved the characters, I loved the idea, I loved the plot and having all of my favorite fairy tales coming together in one place. Miz Kontis's writing style was perfect in keeping with this theme, and the end result is a lovely story full of magic and drama, pulling together classic characters and classic stories in new and exciting ways. This is not to be missed!
LauraRobin24 More than 1 year ago
Charming story. Enjoyed all of the fairy-tales coming together. I am a 26 year old YA enthusiasts and found the story to be intriguing. I recommend this book to others who like a different spin on fairy-tales as well. The story is geared toward the younger side of the young adults genre, but I still found it to be interesting.
TheBumbleGirl1 More than 1 year ago
I do love my fairy-tale stories and when I come across a retelling of not one fairy-tale, but a few of my favorites all entwined into one book - it is a must read for me! And because of that, I am going to have high expectations for it - and I'm happy to say, Alethea Kontis delivered an exceptional and enticing whimsical tale that swept me off my feet! For me, this story flowed quickly and beautifully... I really enjoyed the way Kontis was able to string so many fairy-tales together... The Frog Prince, Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Peter Pan, Jack and the Beanstalk... while keeping the story going with what I would traditionally expect - the lessons to be learned, unforgettable characters, good versus evil and the innocence of true love. I loved all of the characters, even the 'evil' ones, lol! Their descriptions and personalities all shined through enough to make them individually memorable - and that was so important being that there were so many to keep track of. I applaud Kontis for being able to pull this off. Sunday is the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter, which means, that she will possess great magical powers and destined for many good things. She is the youngest of 10 in the Woodcutter family, who loves to write stories, but limits herself to only writing about her family in fear of writing new stories that eventually come true... Sunday befriends Grumble, The Frog, and her three kisses turns him back into a man, Prince Rumbold. Unbeknownst to Sunday, the Prince returns home to gather his strength and creates a plan to meet Sunday again, and have her fall in love with him for his true self. And the quest begins with balls, fairy godmothers and dark magic. It does help if you are familiar with the more popular original tales. And even though the ending is somewhat predictable, it did not keep me from reading this book in one night. If you truly believe in fairy-tales, this is definitely a book for you!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've been seeing a lot of reviews, both negative and positive describing this book as a fairy tale retold.  That is not what this is.  It is a whole new fairy tale. The biggest mistake anyone can make when opening this book is to think you know the story already.  This is an entirely new creature. What Alethea Kontis does in this book is bring to like our favorite tales from the Brothers Grimm and a touch of Hans Christen Anderson to weave the magical rules of this world. This is a world where, if a girl meets a talking frog, she easily figures out its a man because her world is full of enchanted frogs turned men, full of Kings with no name, full of fairy godmothers baring magical gifts. I quite enjoyed this read. It sets up a beautiful world and Alethea's writing voice is perfect for it. She captures the true essence of fairy tales and makes them her own. I grew up with Brothers Grimm and every once in a while, Alethea would make a reference to apples and you knew they must be poisoned, or to any other number of things and if you're a true fairy tale lover, you understand the rules of them. She doesn't spell it out for you but if you pay enough attention, she leaves you enough clues to make an educated guess.  Like so many people having violet eyes.  I think this says how much magic is in their blood.  Purple and violet always seem to be a reference to magic. This was a lovely start to what is going to be an enchanting series. Just remember, when you open the book, let Alethea weave her magical tale. She's not retelling you a story you've heard a thousand times.  She's using the age old fairy tale references and rules to create something entirely new. She's setting up a world that I can't wait to visit again to find out what happened with all of Sunday's sisters and, hopefully, her brothers too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All of your favorite fairy takes wrap in one great story. Its pretty cool how they alp fit in one story but the author did it! I just wish there was more to it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Aletha Kontis has written a beautiful story interweaving many favorite fairy tales. One can see the scenes as they play out in front of you. The characters become larger than life, the magic is palatable. If you enjoy fairy tales told in new ways then you will love this. The intricate weaving of so many different stories had me wrapped up, guessing who or what would come next. Finding little hints at stories untold throughout the entire book was such an enjoyable thrill. I truly enjoyed this book, and it will be on my reread list frequently. This is one of those books where you can take something away with each read. The cover of this book is absolutely beautiful. But the words written inside are even more beautifully written!
Crytal More than 1 year ago
An interesting blend of just about every fairy tale ever written. And in a way that worked. The story was well thought out and held my interest, and left me wanting more of the sisters that we didn't get to see much of.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked this book. I am a fan of fairy tales and love the tv show Once Upon a Time. I think this book is like that show. A fairy tale mash-up where the stories are retold, sometimes differently, and where a character may be more than one fairy tale character and their stories intertwine and they interact with each other. It can be hard to follow with all the different siblings and stories going on but it is fun. I would reccomend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book so many mysteries
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed the story. It kept my attention and I finished it in 2 days. There were a couple of times where the writing lost me and I wasn't sure what happened and I had to go back and re-read. I will definately read her new book which releases in October. Fun, easygoing and interesting read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love anything that has to do with Fairytales so i thought that i was going to love this book. Well i read the whole thing it was not very long in the first place and it incorporated so many different stories all into the one which was cool. What i did not like was the way that she was changing the fairytales. She was twisting things around which is an authors right. But the way her writing style was just like a fairytale but at points i was very confused as to what was going on and had to reread what was last said. Over all it was a good book the plot was enchanting but it was confusing to read.
shep1 More than 1 year ago
This book had an excellent premise; the idea of mixing all the fairy tales into one storyline was appealing. Unfortunately, this angle wasn't thoroughly explored. The story was sweet but became predictable and superficial. There were spots that it definitely lagged. Still, I would recommend this book to my 9th/10th grade lower level reading students. The read is fairly easy and comprehension was solid. It would be a good stepping stone to more complex reads.
dizzyweasel on LibraryThing 10 months ago
I, like my fellow reviewers, found this book to be a pastiche of fairy tales, with plots taken haphazardly from one and inserted into another. At times it felt as though the author had to meet some sort of allusion quota, or that I were playing a 'Name that Tale!' game. But unlike my fellow reviewers, I was not captivated by this novel. The premise is simple: girl meets frog, girl kisses frog, frog becomes prince, prince loves girl, girl rejects prince. The story just didn't get more complex than that.Robin McKinley has proven that it's possible to take a classic fairy story and give it mature, nuanced substance. I found the substance lacking in this novel. Too whimsical? Maybe. I like my fairy tales with a slightly darker edge. If, however, you're looking for a cute, mood lifting tale to occupy an afternoon, Enchanted may be just what you're looking for.
mimi-vee on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Rating: 4.5 beautiful stars out of 5!Absolutely ADORABLE. Magical. Smile-inducing. And so incredibly sweet! This book is one of the many reasons why I love fairytales and their re-tellings so much! Enchanted may mention some of my favourite fairytales ¿ from The Princess and the Frog to Cinderella to Jack and the Beanstalk and more! ¿ but it's much more than just a re-telling of them all. Alethea Kontis weaves them perfectly into an original and surprisingly complex story that's her own, adding in a cast of fantastic characters that will steal your heart away. Sweet and caring and determined and clever, I adored Sunday from start to finish! Both she and Rumbold (my new favourite frog prince) warmed my heart repeatedly. I love how the very first time she kisses him as a frog, he doesn't change back right away. It was sweetly realistic.Some people may be turned off by the promise of insta-love (since this is a fairytale, after all), but the author managed to pull it off perfectly without making it feel like overwhelming devotion! And even if that instant spark does bother you at first, I promise that by the end of the book, you'll love them both too much to care. Beautiful, enchanting, and everything I could ever ask for, Enchanted is one of my favourite re-tellings of anything to date! Alethea Kontis, like Sunday, is a masterful storyteller, and you should definitely be prepared to smile when you pick up this book. :) BUY or BORROW?: An absolute MUST-have for anyone who likes (or just appreciates) fairytales at all, but even if you don't, I'd recommend this book anyways!
chickey1981 on LibraryThing 10 months ago
I have had this on my to read list for a while now. I'm a sucker for fairy tales.Enchanted by Alethea Kontis is an amalgamation of every fairy tale you've ever heard of. The main protagonists are Sunday, the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter, and Rumbold, the prince that was enchanted into a frog. From their meeting, there is a whirlwind of balls, giants, dancing princesses, geese that lay golden eggs, both good and evil fairy godmothers, you get the idea.There are wonderful things about this book. Sunday and Rumbold are both very likeable characters. Kontis intertwines stories that we've heard all of our lives into one story. It's a feat that is difficult with a nice result.It's funny because as I was reading this book, I thought of Seventh Son by Orson Scott Card (the seventh son of a seventh son). My second thought was that it almost felt like a bunch of creative writing contest entries strung together. The author's note at the end reveals that Card was in her mind and that she did enter several fairy tale contests.Many times during this book, I was for lack of another word, enchanted. But other times, I just felt she was trying to do way too much in too little space. I loved all the references, but I almost felt in fairy tale overload. It's a difficult balance to maintain, and I'm not sure she quite succeeded.That said, it was a book well worth reading, and I'm not sorry that I undertook this adventure. Kontis has a rich imagination that will serve her well.
DarkFaerieTales on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Review Courtesy of Dark Faerie TalesQuick & Dirty: A fairy tale retelling that encompasses many of your childhood classic favorites, all told into one magical story.Opening Sentence: My name is Sunday Woodcutter, and I am doomed to a happy life.The Review:In Enchanted, Althea Kontis takes us on this charming adventure, mostly surrounding a girl and her frog prince. Sunday Woodcutter is the seventh daughter of Seven. Her sisters and brothers before her, each have their own gifts, making it easy to be overlooked in her unhappy state. But as the seventh daughter, she is destined to be ¿blithe and bonny and good and gay.¿ Enchanted begins as Sunday narrates her first meeting with Grumble, a frog who cannot remember his past. Since Grumble does not have any memories of his own, Sunday tells him stories of her family, indulging him with wonderful details and whimsical tales. Sunday¿s voice is matter-of-fact, a little somber, and in my mind, monotone. But to me, it wasn¿t about how Sunday said things, it was about what she said, and to whom.Together, Sunday and Grumble form a friendship so pure and true, that it definitely withstands any faerie magic in the land. Through the stories told, and memories cherished, Sunday and Grumble shows us who they are, who they were, and in my mind, who Kontis wants them to be. Sunday tells tale after tale, with hints of stories like The Princess and the Pea, Sleeping Beauty, and Jack and the Beanstalk, filled with Kontis¿ own enchantment and magic.But faerie magic isn¿t the only powerful thing in the land, with Sunday¿s honest love, frog Grumble transforms back into Prince Rumbauld. Rumbauld has paid for his mistakes, hence the frog transformation, but it isn¿t the end of his childhood consequences. Enchanted now takes the narration from Rumbauld¿s point of view, and his renewed heart, where he takes us on the journey from beast to man. Rumbauld is dreamy, and filled with determination. Where he has many faults to make amends for, his journey is realistic. He really suffers and you can feel his pain. Kontis didn¿t spare him when she threw those verbal punches.Sunday is the seventh daughter, of a seventh daughter. And while her siblings have talents and beauty that surpasses her own, Sunday holds magic deep within herself. Whether it be the power in her words, or the strength of her love, Sunday is a heroine that definitely rewrites the rules. Her outlook on life is grey, jaded by her family¿s past and the stories that haunt her. She is expressive, and sometimes naive, but she redeems herself time and time again. Isn¿t it true that without experiences, we do not truly live?All of the characters are full of imaginative riches, adding to the humor and tragedies spoken throughout the book. With each tale comes a lesson, and with each of those lessons, comes a progression in the story that transforms Enchanted from a simple fantasy, to bewitching magic. Each one had their own part, whether it be a romantic element or a wicked one.Kontis¿ world is magical, allowing for her characters to take center stage, and for her plot to progress in an organic fashion. To me, her world is a supporting character, complementing and challenging the heroes and heroines in the story. Enchanted contains all of the best part of familiar childhood fairy tales, but with Kontis¿ own creative spin to the story. Kontis¿ voice is clear and definite, never allowing you to question whose story this is. The plot is definitely enchanting, mesmerizing with the intricate paths that the journey brings. Imagination is your only barrier when it comes to Enchanted. Read with your heart and follow your instincts when you fall in love with Enchanted.Notable Scene:¿You have ruined me, Sunday. I didn¿t realize how much I longed for the company of others until I had your words. When they are gone, the nights are darker. The silence is loud and bottomless, and I am empty. I miss them, my beloved Sunday, and I miss you.It was no use fighting;
Aerrin99 on LibraryThing 10 months ago
While I loved the idea of this book (a tale set in a world of fairy tales, with a number of them intersecting), the reality is that the author got so caught up in the premise that she lost sight of the plot. Things are shoehorned in in awkward ways and leave loose ends hanging regularly. The main plot - the friendship of a girl and a frog which turns into the romance between a girl and a prince - is poorly handled and unconvincing. It's not unusual for love in fairy tales to happen in a matter of days, but this book steeped itself in enough other 'regular' emotions (there were some nice points on family especially) that it feels very, very odd. Worse, near the middle of the book the plot skitters off on a side path that could have been interesting, but ultimately ends up quite confusing. There were scenes I had to read three times, and I'm still not sure I was clear on what was going on in them. Overall, a great premise, an extremely mediocre execution.
thebumblegirl on LibraryThing 10 months ago
I do love my fairy-tale stories and when I come across a retelling of not one fairy-tale, but a few of my favorites all entwined into one book - it is a must read for me! And because of that, I am going to have high expectations for it - and I'm happy to say, Alethea Kontis delivered an exceptional and enticing whimsical tale that swept me off my feet! For me, this story flowed quickly and beautifully... I really enjoyed the way Kontis was able to string so many fairy-tales together... The Frog Prince, Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Peter Pan, Jack and the Beanstalk... while keeping the story going with what I would traditionally expect - the lessons to be learned, unforgettable characters, good versus evil and the innocence of true love.I loved all of the characters, even the 'evil' ones, lol! Their descriptions and personalities all shined through enough to make them individually memorable - and that was so important being that there were so many to keep track of. I applaud Kontis for being able to pull this off.Sunday is the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter, which means, that she will possess great magical powers and destined for many good things. She is the youngest of 10 in the Woodcutter family, who loves to write stories, but limits herself to only writing about her family in fear of writing new stories that eventually come true... Sunday befriends Grumble, The Frog, and her three kisses turns him back into a man, Prince Rumbold. Unbeknownst to Sunday, the Prince returns home to gather his strength and creates a plan to meet Sunday again, and have her fall in love with him for his true self. And the quest begins with balls, fairy godmothers and dark magic.It does help if you are familiar with the more popular original tales. And even though the ending is somewhat predictable, it did not keep me from reading this book in one night.If you truly believe in fairy-tales, this is definitely a book for you!
jshillingford on LibraryThing 10 months ago
I've been reading a lot of YA lit over the last year, and have enjoyed, to varying degrees, everything I have picked up. I also enjoyed Enchanted. However, this is one of those titles that leans more heavily toward the young than the adult.Kontis has designed quite a mash-up of fairy tales in her story of Sunday Woodcutter. Pretty much every major fairy tale has some trope that pops up in the book. Fairy godmothers, curses, magic kisses, magic beans, foundlings, changelings, and more all come to fruition. Sometimes I felt like the author threw everything but the kitchen sink into the story. It was interesting, but to encompass so many elements it required a lot of exposition. A lot. So, the characters don't do very much until the last third of the book. Thankfully, that last third was very entertaining, but I put the book down to do other things many times until I reached it.That said, the writing shows a lot of imagination, and potential. I loved learning about Sunday's sisters, all named after the days of the week, and what made each of the special (or doomed, as the case may be!) The characters in this book are interesting. Still, at the heart of Enchanted is the love story of Sunday and her frog prince. So many obstacles are arrayed before them, deemed by fate and fairytale to keep them apart. When the characters do begin to take action, the last third of the book flew by right up to the HEA that only a true fairy tale can provide.Overall, this book was not as rich and satisfying for adults as other YA such as Daughter of Smoke and Bone, or Tempest: A Novel. However, it was enjoyable and a rare YA book that parents concerned about too many adult themes can give to their young teens without fear. 3.5 stars, recommended.
Kspina More than 1 year ago
I LOVE THIS BOOK! I CAN'T WAIT TO GET MY HANDS ON THE WHOLE SERIES!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved how the prince talks about his love for her!!!!! I recomend this book to anyone who loves a clean, spunky romance!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Worth $80,000,000,000,000,. I am a professional book critic and my job is being a book critic so listen up, pay what i say and along with the book you will get a SPECIAL SURPRISE!!!!!!!!!!!!? (What i amean is that you will get a present!)
Jasmyn9 More than 1 year ago
Enchanted was quite the mix of fairy tale goodness. I saw Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk, a hint of Rapunzel, The Little Old Lady Who Lives in a Shoe, The Swan Princess, The Princess and the Pea, The Frog Prince, and I'm sure there are many more that I'm just not thinking of at the moment, Sooo many that at times it got a little crazy. I really loved the Woodcutter family - named after the days of the week - they all have their very own personality based on an old rhyme. The story really starts with Sunday falling in love with a frog - a talking one of course - and really takes off from there. We have fairy godmothers, princes, evil fairies, and even a changeling. I really liked how we got to know so many different people in the Woodcutter family. All the sisters have a special role to play and each of them get to be the hero at some point in the story. I loved that they were the heroes and got to save the day several times. Arilland is an amazing kingdom full of magic that I really enjoyed. But there were just too many fairy tales going on. While there were combined and meshed together quite well, my mind kept jumping around from one to another and sometimes lost track of where it was actually going in the story. I had a few "now what" moments. On the other hand, I'm totally invested in this family and I need to know what happens to the next sister.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago