An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

by John Locke
4.1 11

NOOK Book(eBook)

FREE
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding by John Locke

Volume 2 of Locke's monumental work containing every word of all four books comprising the Essay. The editor, Professor A. C. Fraser, has provided marginal analyses of almost every paragraph, plus hundreds of explanatory footnotes which comment, elaborate, explain difficult points, etc.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940023600178
Publisher: Tegg, 1836
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

JOHN LOCKE was born August 29, 1632, in Somerset, England, the son of landed English gentry. He entered Christ Church College of Oxford Univer­sity in 1652 and passed through the academic ranks quite uneventfully, later assuming a teaching post at the university. To escape ordination in the Church of England—a natural bureaucratic step toward university pro­motion—Locke took up the study of medicine and was transported into a new world of "natural philosophy" in which he associated with powerful scientific minds like that of Robert Boyle.

It was through his concern for the authority of the state in religious matters and the Natural Law used to support it that Locke became inter­ested in the role of Natural Law in experience—a curiosity that led him to philosophy, and more particularly to epistemology, as an avocation. Add to his interest in Natural Law the sociopolitical climate of seventeenth-century England—steeped in violent civil war, counter-revolution, restoration, deposition of the monarchy and the subsequent Parliamentary rule, and the eventual restoration of the monarchy late in the century—along with an intellectual stage dominated by the authoritarianism of Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan, and one can begin to sense the pressures at work on Locke.

After accepting a brief diplomatic mission to Madrid in 1665, Locke retreated to his teaching and medical experiments. His real political educa­tion was to come quite by accident as a result of an association with the first Earl of Shaftesbury, a wealthy and extremely powerful figure who had survived the vicissitudes of England's political turbulence. Initially employed as the Earl's medical advisor, Locke later became a permanent member of the household. It was here under the skillful tutelage of Shaftesbury that Locke matured as a social philosopher. The political intrigues in which the Earl was engaged caused Locke to be exiled, though he later returned to England after the Glorious Revolution that saw William and Mary placed on the English throne in 1688.

Locke's famous Two Treatises of Government, of which the second is most widely read, are an outgrowth of his original political proclivities, the sociopolitical chaos plaguing England during his lifetime, and his associa­tion with the Earl of Shaftesbury. Locke's dedication to individual liberty, government by consent, the social contract, and the right to revolt against governments that endanger the rights of citizens, has made him one of the most important political thinkers of the past four centuries. His legacy will live on as long as there are people fighting for freedom. He died in Oates, England, on October 28, 1704.

Some of John Locke's major works include: A Letter for Toleration (1689), Two Treatises of Government (1690), An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1693), Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693), and The Reasonableness of Christianity (1695).

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Another book I read while getting my BA in Philosophy at UCLA. The most interesting thing about this work of Locke's is that we also have Leibnitz's New Essays, which discusses it point by point. As far as I know this is a unique situation among the extant works of the classic thinkers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although of primary interest to serious students of philosophy, there are many readers who will want to try Locke's famous Essay. It should appeal especially to those readers who agree with the British poet Pope's advice that <the proper study of mankind is man.>
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There appear to be odd artifacts in the conversion process where suddenly appeared odd symbols. It is also not as easily navigated as other books, but it is free and a quality read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago