Extract from Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven

Extract from Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven

by Mark Twain

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Overview

Extract from Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven by Mark Twain

"Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven" is a short story written by American writer Mark Twain. It first appeared in print in Harper's Magazine in December 1907 and January 1908, and was published in book form with some revisions in 1909.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781725599116
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 08/15/2018
Pages: 38
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.08(d)

About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American writer, humorist, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer.

Date of Birth:

November 30, 1835

Date of Death:

April 21, 1910

Place of Birth:

Florida, Missouri

Place of Death:

Redding, Connecticut

Read an Excerpt

I


ELL, when I had been dead about thirty years, I begun to get a little anxious. Mind you, I had been whizzing through space all that time, like a comet. Like a comet! Why, Peters, I laid over the lot of them! Of course there warn't any of them going my way, as a steady thing, you know, because they travel in a long circle like the loop of a lasso, whereas I was pointed as straight as a dart for the Hereafter; but I happened on one every now and then that was going my way for an hour or so, and then we had a bit of a brush together. But it was generally pretty one-sided, because I sailed by them the same as if they were standing still. An ordinary comet don't make more than about 200,000 miles a minute. Of course when I came across one of that sort -like Encke's and Halley's comets, for instance -it warn't anything but just a flash and a vanish, you see. You couldn't rightly call it a race. It was as if the comet was a gravel-train and I was a telegraph despatch. But after I got outside of our astronomical system, I used to flush a comet occasionally that was something like. We haven't got any such comets -ours don't begin. One night I was swinging along at a good round gait, everything taut and trim, and the wind in my favor -I judged I was going about a million miles a minute -it might have been more, it couldn't have been less -when I flushed a most uncommonly big one about three points off my starboard bow. By his stern lights I judged he was bearing about northeast -and -by -north -half -east. Well, it was so near my course that I wouldn't throw away the chance; so I fell off a point, steadied my helm, and went for him. You should have heard me whiz, and seen the electric fur fly! In about a minute and a half I was fringed out with an electrical nimbus that flamed around for miles and miles and lit up all space like broad day. The comet was burning blue in the distance, like a sickly torch, when I first sighted him, but he begun to grow bigger and bigger as I crept up on him. I slipped up on him so fast that when I had gone about 150,000,000 miles I was close enough to be swallowed up in the phosphorescent glory of his wake, and I couldn't see anything for the glare. Thinks I, it won't do to run into him, so I shunted to one side and tore along. By and by I closed up abreast of his tail. Do you know what it was like? It was like a gnat closing up on the continent of America. I forged along. By and by I had sailed along his coast for a little upwards of a hundred and fifty million miles, and then I could see by the shape of him that I hadn't even got up to his waistband yet. Why, Peters, we don't know anything about comets, down here. If you want to see cornets that are comets, you've got to go outside of our solar system -where there's room for them, you understand. My friend, I've seen comets out there that couldn't even lay down inside the orbits of our noblest comets without their tails hanging over.

Well, I boomed along another hundred and fifty million miles, and got up abreast his shoulder, as you may say. I was feeling pretty fine, I tell you; but just then I noticed the officer of the deck come to the side and hoist his glass in my direction. Straight off I heard him sing out -

"Below there, ahoy! Shake her up, shake her up! Heave on a hundred million billion tons of brimstone!"

"Ay -ay, sir!"

"Pipe the stabboard watch! All hands on deck!"

"Ay -ay, sir!"

"Send two hundred thousand million men aloft to shake out royals and sky-scrapers!"

"Ay -ay, sir!"

"Hand the stuns'ls! Hang out every rag you've got! Clothe her from stem to rudder-post!"

"Ay -ay, sir!"

In about a second I begun to see I'd woke up a pretty ugly customer, Peters. In less than ten seconds that comet was just a blazing cloud of red-hot canvas. It was piled up into the heavens clean out of sight -the old thing seemed to swell out and occupy all space; the sulphur smoke from the furnaces -oh, well, nobody can describe the way it rolled and tumbled up into the skies, and nobody can half describe the way it smelt. Neither can anybody begin to describe the way that monstrous craft begun to crash along. And such another powwow -thousands of bo's'n's whistles screaming at once, and a crew like the populations of a hundred thousand worlds like ours all swearing at once. Well, I never heard the like of it before.

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Extract from Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Considering the author's time period, in contrast to current day idiotic religious fanatism, Mark Twain's treatise displays more logic and reason for the hereafter than anything I've ever heard in any church sermon. And, unlike most sermons, it was thankfully brief. ––---------LME
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An idea universally pondered, i rather enjoyed mr twain's interpretation of heaven
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago