Forgetting English: Stories

Forgetting English: Stories

by Midge Raymond

Paperback(Edition)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781618220516
Publisher: Byte Level Research
Publication date: 01/04/2017
Edition description: Edition
Pages: 198
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.45(d)

About the Author

Midge Raymond is the author of the novel My Last Continent and the award-winning short-story collection Forgetting English. Her writing has appeared in TriQuarterly, American Literary Review, Bellevue Literary Review, the Los Angeles Times magazine, Poets & Writers, and many other publications.

Midge worked in publishing in New York before moving to Boston, where she taught communication writing at Boston University for six years. She has taught creative writing at Boston's Grub Street Writers, Seattle's Richard Hugo House, and San Diego Writers, Ink. She has also published two books for writers, Everyday Writing and Everyday Book Marketing.

Table of Contents



Stories:

First Sunday

Translation Memory

The Ecstatic Cry

The Road to Hana

Forgetting English

Rest of World

Under Limestone Cliffs

Beyond the Kopjes

Lost Art

Never Turn Your Back on the Ocean

Reading Group Guide

Customer Reviews

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Forgetting English 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
tibobi on LibraryThing 21 days ago
The Short of It:This collection of stories is a restorative tonic for the soul. The Rest of It:I am not a fan of short fiction but every now and then I give it a try and usually I am disappointed. That said, I was not disappointed by Forgetting English. In fact, I was so mesmerized by the beauty of the writing that I spent an entire morning on the couch enjoying it. From one story to the next, I found myself completely and utterly absorbed. Each story is so different and yet there are common themes¿insecurity, yearning, shame and the need to escape.My favorite story happens to be the book¿s title. Forgetting English and is about a teacher by the name of Paige that has taken a teaching job in Taipei in order to escape her life back home. She befriends Jing-wei in an effort to learn Chinese. Both women have secrets and as their stories unfold, we learn how much their friendship means to one another and how flawed the human spirit can be.I found myself embracing several other stories as well:Translation Memory (a married couple grieve in their own way after suffering a loss)The Road to Hana (a married couple struggle with the realization of what they¿ve become, or what they¿ve always been)The Ecstatic Cry (researchers in Antarctica, Empire penguins and the need for human contact)It¿s not often that I tell anyone to go out and get a particular book, but this collection is a real treasure. The writing is effortless and natural and each story, although brief, is very satisfying in the end. This is a great collection to curl-up with. I recommend that you get yourself a copy.
LisaLynne on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Forgetting English is a slim volume of haunting short stories. These are stories of loss, of deep emotion, and of women trying to find their way forward. The language is lyrical ¿ poetic in places ¿ and the stories were lovely to read. Author Midge Raymond provides a very short but entertaining collection.¿The lanterns bob gently as they drift out to sea, some extinguished by waves or by the splash of other lanterns swimming past. Paige sees shapes of light hovering above the water ¿ probably the mist in the air, or the effects of Abbey¿s hash, or of the tears that suddenly rise in her eyes ¿ but she stands still and watches for a long time, until the lights and voices fade away.¿My favorite of the stories is ¿The Rest of the World,¿ perhaps because it¿s about a businesswoman on the road, a situation I am pretty familiar with. There is a definite feeling of disconnectedness when you¿re on the road, especially in a strange country. Our traveler is in Taipei, dealing with unpleasant business while she deals with a crisis in her marriage. In her first hotel room, a man has left a message on the voicemail for another woman about a dinner date ¿ and our businesswoman meets him instead. I love that idea, even if it¿s something I¿d probably never do. Through years of business travel, our traveler ¿ whose name we never learn ¿ has lost her connection to her husband, but maybe she is finally making a connection to herself.¿I¿m not sure why I hope Kyle will call, except that I long for the familiarity of his voice. It reminds me that I¿m still anchored to the world, a feeling I tend to lose when I travel, a feeling I¿ve lost almost completely since losing him. I¿m away six months out of a year, and when I¿m home, I¿m usually gearing up for another trip or coming down from one.¿This is not a long book ¿ only 10 stories, less than 150 pages ¿ which made it a quick read. The problem I had with it is that the stories are very much alike. The similar themes and mood, as well as Raymond¿s style of storytelling, sometimes made the book feel like one long story. The writing is excellent and I was easily caught up in the stories. I hope that she expands on her themes and adds some additional stories. I would gladly read more from this author.
TiBookChatter More than 1 year ago
I am not a fan of short fiction but every now and then I give it a try and usually I am disappointed. That said, I was not disappointed by Forgetting English. In fact, I was so mesmerized by the beauty of the writing that I spent an entire morning on the couch enjoying it. From one story to the next, I found myself completely and utterly absorbed. Each story is so different and yet there are common themes.insecurity, yearning, shame and the need to escape. My favorite story happens to be the book's title. Forgetting English and is about a teacher by the name of Paige that has taken a teaching job in Taipei in order to escape her life back home. She befriends Jing-wei in an effort to learn Chinese. Both women have secrets and as their stories unfold, we learn how much their friendship means to one another and how flawed the human spirit can be. I found myself embracing several other stories as well: Translation Memory (a married couple grieve in their own way after suffering a loss) The Road to Hana (a married couple struggle with the realization of what they've become, or what they've always been) The Ecstatic Cry (researchers in Antarctica, Empire penguins and the need for human contact) It's not often that I tell anyone to go out and get a particular book, but this collection is a real treasure. The writing is effortless and natural and each story, although brief, is very satisfying in the end. This is a great collection to curl-up with. I recommend that you get yourself a copy.